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1.
Korean Journal of Clinical Oncology ; (2): 138-141, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-894087

ABSTRACT

An extragastrointestinal stromal tumor (EGIST) is a gastrointestinal stromal tumor that arises outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Most EGISTs are located in the omentum, mesentery, and retroperitoneum. The occurrence of an EGIST at the perianal region is very rare. Herein, we report our experience with EGISTs in the perianal area and review the literature. A 70-year-old man presented to our hospital with a 2-year history of anal discomfort. A pelvic magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a homogenous, well-defined, soft tissue density mass. The patient underwent mass excision, and the pathological examination confirmed that the mass was an EGIST. The size of the tumor was 4.3×3.2 cm, and the mitotic count was 1 per 50 high-power fields. The tumor cells were immunohistochemically positive for KIT and CD34 but were negative for S-100 and alpha-smooth muscle actin. There were no other abnormal findings in the gastrointestinal tract; upon pathological review, this case was confirmed as perianal EGIST. Therefore, EGIST should be considered as a differential diagnosis of perianal masses.

2.
Korean Journal of Clinical Oncology ; (2): 138-141, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-901791

ABSTRACT

An extragastrointestinal stromal tumor (EGIST) is a gastrointestinal stromal tumor that arises outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Most EGISTs are located in the omentum, mesentery, and retroperitoneum. The occurrence of an EGIST at the perianal region is very rare. Herein, we report our experience with EGISTs in the perianal area and review the literature. A 70-year-old man presented to our hospital with a 2-year history of anal discomfort. A pelvic magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a homogenous, well-defined, soft tissue density mass. The patient underwent mass excision, and the pathological examination confirmed that the mass was an EGIST. The size of the tumor was 4.3×3.2 cm, and the mitotic count was 1 per 50 high-power fields. The tumor cells were immunohistochemically positive for KIT and CD34 but were negative for S-100 and alpha-smooth muscle actin. There were no other abnormal findings in the gastrointestinal tract; upon pathological review, this case was confirmed as perianal EGIST. Therefore, EGIST should be considered as a differential diagnosis of perianal masses.

3.
Annals of Surgical Treatment and Research ; : 205-212, 2020.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-830553

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of reduced fasting time on postoperative recovery in patients who underwent totally laparoscopic distal gastrectomy (TLDG). @*Methods@#This retrospective study included 347 patients who underwent TLDG. Patients were divided into 2 groups:reduced fasting time group (n = 139) and conventional feeding group (n = 208). We compared the total hospital cost and recovery parameters, such as postoperative complications, mean hospital stay, day of first flatus, initiation of soft diet, and serum CRP levels, between the 2 groups. @*Results@#The reduced fasting time group had a lower total hospital cost (P < 0.001) than the conventional feeding group.Regarding postoperative complications, there was no significant difference between the 2 groups (P = 0.085). Patients in the reduced fasting time group had a significantly shorter duration of mean hospital stay (P < 0.001), an earlier first flatus (P = 0.002), an earlier initiation of soft diet (P < 0.001), and lower level of serum CRP concentration (day of surgery, P = 0.036;postoperative days 2, 5, and 7, P = 0.01, 0.009, and 0.012, respectively) than patients in the conventional feeding group. @*Conclusion@#Reduced fasting time can enhance postoperative recovery in patients who undergo TLDG and may reduce medical costs.

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