Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 11 de 11
Filter
Add filters








Year range
1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-836532

ABSTRACT

Objectives@#The aim of this study was to compare the nutritional intake and Diet Quality Index-International (DQI-I) of gynecological cancer survivors and normal women. @*Methods@#This study compared the anthropometric indices, dietary behavior, nutritional intake, and DQI-I in women with previous history of breast or uterine cancer [Gynecological cancer survivors group (GCSG, n=126)] and normal women [Normal control group (NCG, n=7,011)] using the 2013~2016 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data. @*Results@#Body mass index and waist circumference were lower in the GCSG compared the NCG. The frequency of skipping breakfast and eating out was higher in the NCG compared to GCSG. Energy and fat intake were significantly higher in the NCG than in the GCSG, whereas intake of all minerals and vitamins (excluding thiamine), and dietary fiber intake were higher in GCSG. It was observed that the fatty acid intake of the GCSG was significantly lower than that of the NCG. The diet quality evaluation using DQI-I results showed that GCSG was higher in the “within-group” diet variety and adequacy of vegetable group than the NCG, whereas the intake level of the fruit group was higher in NCG. Besides, protein, calcium, and vitamin C intake were higher in the GCSG than in the NCG. The GCSG showed higher levels of total fat and saturated fat moderation than the NCG, whereas cholesterol moderation showed the opposite results. The results of DQI-I comparison according to the cancer survival years showed that the overall score and scores related to diet adequacy and balance were higher in the below 5-year group, whereas the over 5-year group scored higher in terms of moderation of diet. @*Conclusions@#The results of this study suggest that a chronic disease based management approach is needed in cancer survivors. The study provides important data which can help in the preparation of guidelines for long-term lifestyle and diet management, in these patients.

2.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-759636

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study examined the relationship between the presence of allergic rhinitis and the nutritional intake levels of Korean infants. METHODS: The study involved a total of 1,214 infant subjects aged 1~5 months from the 2013~2016 KNHNES (Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey). The Subjects were classified into two groups based on the presence of allergic rhinitis: Non-allergic rhinitis infants (NARI, n=1,088) and allergic rhinitis infants (ARI, n=126). The general characteristics and family history of allergies, nutrient intake status, nutrient supplement intake, and breast milk and baby food start period data of the two groups were compared. All statistical analyses accounted for the complex sampling design effect and sampling weights. RESULTS: The mean age was 0.5 years old in the ARI group compared to the NARI group. In the residence, the rate of urban was higher in ARI. The family history revealed a significant difference between the two groups, particularly those of mothers rather than fathers. The nutrient intake levels were high in energy, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, iron, riboflavin, niacin, and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Breastfeeding was significantly higher in the ARI group than in the NARI group. The baby food start period was 0.3 months earlier in NARI group than in ARI group. The height, body weight, and birth weight were higher in ARI group than NARI group. The result of Odds ratio analysis showed that excess energy, protein, calcium, phosphorus, iron, riboflavin, and niacin intake increases the risk of allergic rhinitis. CONCLUSIONS: These results can be used as data to develop nutrition guidelines for allergic rhinitis infants.


Subject(s)
Birth Weight , Body Height , Breast Feeding , Calcium , Fathers , Fatty Acids, Unsaturated , Humans , Hypersensitivity , Infant , Iron , Korea , Milk, Human , Mothers , Niacin , Nutrition Policy , Nutrition Surveys , Odds Ratio , Phosphorus , Potassium , Rhinitis , Rhinitis, Allergic , Riboflavin , Sodium , Weights and Measures
6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-144110

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Flow cytometry (FC) HLA-B27 typing is still used extensively for the diagnosis of spondyloarthropathies. If patient blood samples are stored for a prolonged duration, this testing can be performed in a batch manner, and in-house cellular controls could easily be procured. In this study, we investigated various methods of storing patient blood samples. METHODS: We compared four storage methods: three methods of analyzing lymphocytes (whole blood stored at room temperature, frozen mononuclear cells, and frozen white blood cells [WBCs] after lysing red blood cells [RBCs]), and one method using frozen platelets (FPLT). We used three ratios associated with mean fluorescence intensities (MFI) for HLAB27 assignment: the B27 MFI ratio (sample/control) for HLA-B27 fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC); the B7 MFI ratio for HLA-B7 phycoerythrin (PE); and the ratio of these two ratios, B7/B27 ratio. RESULTS: Comparing the B27 MFI ratios of each storage method for the HLA-B27+ samples and the B7/B27 ratios for the HLA-B7+ samples revealed that FPLT was the best of the four methods. FPLT had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 99.3% for HLA-B27 assignment in DNA-typed samples (N=164) when the two criteria, namely, B27 MFI ratio >4.0 and B7/B27 ratio <1.5, were used. CONCLUSIONS: The FPLT method was found to offer a simple, economical, and accurate method of FC HLA-B27 typing by using stored patient samples. If stored samples are used, this method has the potential to replace the standard FC typing method when used in combination with a complementary DNA-based method.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/metabolism , Erythrocytes/metabolism , Flow Cytometry , Freezing , HLA-B27 Antigen/blood , HLA-B7 Antigen/blood , Histocompatibility Testing , Humans , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Spondylarthropathies/diagnosis , Temperature
7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-144103

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Flow cytometry (FC) HLA-B27 typing is still used extensively for the diagnosis of spondyloarthropathies. If patient blood samples are stored for a prolonged duration, this testing can be performed in a batch manner, and in-house cellular controls could easily be procured. In this study, we investigated various methods of storing patient blood samples. METHODS: We compared four storage methods: three methods of analyzing lymphocytes (whole blood stored at room temperature, frozen mononuclear cells, and frozen white blood cells [WBCs] after lysing red blood cells [RBCs]), and one method using frozen platelets (FPLT). We used three ratios associated with mean fluorescence intensities (MFI) for HLAB27 assignment: the B27 MFI ratio (sample/control) for HLA-B27 fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC); the B7 MFI ratio for HLA-B7 phycoerythrin (PE); and the ratio of these two ratios, B7/B27 ratio. RESULTS: Comparing the B27 MFI ratios of each storage method for the HLA-B27+ samples and the B7/B27 ratios for the HLA-B7+ samples revealed that FPLT was the best of the four methods. FPLT had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 99.3% for HLA-B27 assignment in DNA-typed samples (N=164) when the two criteria, namely, B27 MFI ratio >4.0 and B7/B27 ratio <1.5, were used. CONCLUSIONS: The FPLT method was found to offer a simple, economical, and accurate method of FC HLA-B27 typing by using stored patient samples. If stored samples are used, this method has the potential to replace the standard FC typing method when used in combination with a complementary DNA-based method.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/metabolism , Erythrocytes/metabolism , Flow Cytometry , Freezing , HLA-B27 Antigen/blood , HLA-B7 Antigen/blood , Histocompatibility Testing , Humans , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Spondylarthropathies/diagnosis , Temperature
8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-202295

ABSTRACT

Laboratory values change with age and interpreting laboratory results from elderly people using the reference intervals for younger adults may not be appropriate. The authors investigated the distribution patterns of routine chemistry values from elderly people to determine whether current reference intervals are also valid for elderly people. A total of 1,215 persons older than 65 years and 1,827 healthy adults below 65 years of age were evaluated. Blood samples were collected after an overnight fast and analyzed for chemistry tests. Computing the central 95th percentile showed that the total protein, albumin, ALP, LD, creatinine, uric acid, triglyceride, HDL-cholesterol, and electrolytes of elderly people were within the standard reference intervals used in our laboratory. For AST and ALT, the upper range of the central 95th percentile in the elderly population was found to be outside the common reference interval. However, the central 90th percentile values of AST and ALT were compatible with the common reference intervals. GGT, BUN, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and glucose showed higher values than the upper limits of the reference intervals. For common clinical chemistry tests, the common reference values in general should be applicable to elderly people, even though some parameters showed wider distributions in the elderly.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Chemistry, Clinical , Cholesterol , Clinical Chemistry Tests , Creatinine , Electrolytes , Glucose , Humans , Reference Values , Uric Acid
9.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-651206

ABSTRACT

This study was performed to examine the characteristics of protein of red crab (Chionoecetes japonicus) shell powder hydrolyzed by commercial proteases. Red crab shell was digested by commercial proteases, such as Protamex (P), Neutrase (N), Flavourzyme (F), Alcalase (A), Protease M (PM) and Protease A (PA). Protein yield analyzed by Biuret assay, absorbance at 280 nm and brix revealed that PA was the enzyme having the highest proteolytic activity. SDS PAGE showed that molecular weight of proteins produced by protease treatments was various and below 150 kDa. Combinational treatment of proteases (PA + P, PA + PM, PA + F, PA + A) was tried whether these increase protein hydrolysis from red crab shell powder compared to a PA single treatment. Soluble protein content was similar, but amino acid concentration by combinational treatments was higher than PA single treatment [PA + P 247.4 mg/g > PA + F (206.4 mg/g) > PA + A (133.4 mg/g) > PA + PM (59.1 mg/g) > PA (54.9 mg/g)]. Amino acid composition by combinational treatments was slightly different. Most abundant essential amino acids were phenylalanine, glycine, alanine, and leucine, whereas tyrosine and cystine were not detected.


Subject(s)
Alanine , Amino Acids, Essential , Biuret , Cystine , Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel , Endopeptidases , Glycine , Hydrolysis , Leucine , Metalloendopeptidases , Molecular Weight , Peptide Hydrolases , Phenylalanine , Proteins , Subtilisins , Tyrosine
10.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-127536

ABSTRACT

Exflagellation of the malaria parasite microgametocyte usually occurs in the gut cavity of Anopheles mosquitoes following an infective blood meal. Exflagellation is a very rare event in human blood. Due to its rarity, the appearance of this structure in a peripheral blood smear will easily create a diagnostic dilemma. We report a case of malaria with exflagellated microgametes in human blood that was initially mistaken for a double infection of Plasmodium and another blood flagellate. The patient was a 29-year-old Parkistani man presenting with fluctuating fever accompanied by chills and fatigue for 4 days. Initial peripheral blood smear examination showed a number of Plasmodium ring forms, trophozoites, and gametocytes. Additionally, several filamentous structures resembling blood flagellates were seen. With these features, an initial diagnostic impression of combined infection of malaria and blood flagellate was made. Later, we determined that these structures resembling blood flagellates were exflagellated microgametes of malarial parasite. Therefore, the knowledge that exflagellation may appear in human blood with Plasmodium species infection and being more familiar with differentiation of the morphologic features of other species infection can prevent further possible misinterpretation.


Subject(s)
Anopheles , Chills , Culicidae , Fatigue , Fever , Humans , Malaria , Meals , Parasites , Plasmodium , Trophozoites
11.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-649289

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to examine the lipid peroxidation, plasma antioxidant status and insulin resistance in childhood obesity. To this end, we measured blood lipid profiles, glucose, insulin concentrations, plasma antioxidant vitamins, baseline conjugated diene formation as a measure of LDL oxidation in vivo and TRAP (total radical trapping antioxidant potential) of 93 school children (58 nonobese, 35 overweight-obese). Insulin resistance was estimated by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). The overweight-obese children showed significantly higher levels of leptin (p < 0.0001) and triglyceride (p < 0.05) and significantly lower level of plasma lycopene (p < 0.001) and gamma-tocopherol (p < 0.05) compared with the normal weight children. Furthermore, the levels of TRAP were signi-ficantly lower in overweight-obese children (p < 0.05). Significant positive relationships between plasma leptin and conjugated dienes formation (p < 0.005) and inverse relationship between plasma leptin and lipid corrected levels of beta-carotene (p < 0.05), lycopene (p < 0.05) were observed. Our results showed an increased lipid peroxidation and dec-reased antioxidant capacity in childhood obesity which could be involved in the atherosclerotic process.


Subject(s)
beta Carotene , Child , gamma-Tocopherol , Glucose , Homeostasis , Humans , Insulin , Insulin Resistance , Leptin , Lipid Peroxidation , Pediatric Obesity , Plasma , Triglycerides , Vitamins
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL