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1.
Intestinal Research ; : 148-160, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-967008

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#The fecal microbiota of Korean patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) was investigated with respect to disease phenotypes and taxonomic biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of IBD. @*Methods@#Fecal samples from 70 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, 39 Crohn’s disease (CD) patients, and 100 healthy control individuals (HC) were collected. The fecal samples were amplified via polymerase chain reaction and sequenced using Illumina MiSeq. The relationships between fecal bacteria and clinical phenotypes were analyzed using the EzBioCloud database and 16S microbiome pipeline. @*Results@#The alpha-diversity of fecal bacteria was significantly lower in UC and CD (P<0.05) compared to that in HC. Bacterial community compositions in UC and CD were significantly different from that of HC according to Bray-Curtis dissimilarities, and there was also a difference between community composition in UC and CD (P=0.01). In UC, alpha-diversity was further decreased when the disease was more severe and the extent of disease was greater, and community composition significantly differed depending on the extent of the disease. We identified 9 biomarkers of severity and 6 biomarkers of the extent of UC. We also identified 5 biomarkers of active disease and 3 biomarkers of ileocolonic involvement in CD. Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcus gnavus were biomarkers for better prognosis in CD. @*Conclusions@#The fecal microbiota profiles of IBD patients were different from those of HC, and several bacterial taxa may be used as biomarkers to determine disease phenotypes and prognosis. These data may also help discover new therapeutic targets for IBD.

2.
The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine ; : 672-682, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-1003062

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Some management strategies for acute colonic diverticulitis remain controversial in Korean real-world practice because their clinical features differ from those in the West. This study aimed to investigate the opinions of Korean physicians regarding the diagnosis and treatment of acute diverticulitis. @*Methods@#A web-based survey was conducted among gastroenterologists specializing on treating lower gastrointestinal disorders. The questionnaires concerned overall management strategies for colonic diverticulitis, including diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. @*Results@#In total, 209 gastroenterologists responded to the survey. Less than one-fourth of the respondents (23.6%) answered that left-sided colonic diverticulitis is more likely to be complicated than right-sided colonic diverticulitis. Most respondents agreed that immunocompromised patients with diverticulitis have worse clinical outcomes than immunocompetent patients (71.3%). Computed tomography was the most preferred tool for diagnosing diverticulitis (93.9%). Approximately 89% of the respondents answered that they believed antibiotic treatment is necessary to treat acute uncomplicated diverticulitis. Most respondents (92.6%) agreed that emergency surgery is not required for diverticulitis with an abscess or microperforation without panperitonitis. Further, 94.7% of the respondents agreed that colon cancer screening is necessary in patients aged ≥ 50 years with diverticulitis after they have recovered from acute illness. Many respondents (71.4%) agreed that surgery for recurrent diverticulitis should be individualized. @*Conclusions@#Opinions regarding management strategies for colonic diverticulitis among Korean gastroenterologists were well agreed upon in some areas but did not agree well in other areas. Evidence-based guidelines that meet the practical needs of the Korean population should be developed.

3.
Intestinal Research ; : 481-492, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-1000605

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Immunocompromised patients with acute colonic diverticulitis are at high risk for complications and failure of non-surgical treatment. However, evidence on the comparative outcomes of immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients with diverticulitis is lacking. This systematic review and meta-analysis investigated the outcomes of medical treatment in immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients with diverticulitis. @*Methods@#A comprehensive literature search was conducted in PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. Studies comparing the clinical outcomes of immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients with diverticulitis were included. @*Results@#A total of 10 studies with 1,946,461 subjects were included in the quantitative synthesis. The risk of emergency surgery and postoperative mortality after emergency surgery was significantly higher in immunocompromised patients than in immunocompetent patients with diverticulitis (risk ratio [RR], 1.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.31–2.38 and RR, 3.05; 95% CI, 1.70–5.45, respectively). Overall risk of complications associated with diverticulitis was non-significantly higher in immunocompromised than in immunocompetent patients (RR, 1.24; 95% CI, 0.95–1.63). Overall mortality irrespective of surgery was significantly higher in immunocompromised than in immunocompetent patients with diverticulitis (RR, 3.65; 95% CI, 1.73–7.69). By contrast, postoperative mortality after elective surgery was not significantly different between immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients with diverticulitis. In subgroup analysis, the risk of emergency surgery and recurrence was significantly higher in immunocompromised patients with complicated diverticulitis, whereas no significant difference was shown in mild disease. @*Conclusions@#Immunocompromised patients with diverticulitis should be given the best medical treatment with multidisciplinary approach because they had increased risks of surgery, postoperative morbidity, and mortality than immunocompetent patients.

4.
Annals of Surgical Treatment and Research ; : 96-103, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-937180

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Oral sulfate tablets are abundantly used for bowel preparation before colonoscopy. However, their efficiency and safety for bowel preparation before colorectal surgery remain ill-defined. Herein, we aimed to compare the surgical site infection rates and efficiency between oral sulfate tablets and sodium picosulfate. @*Methods@#We designed a prospective, randomized, phase 2 clinical trial. Patients with colorectal cancer aged 19–75 years who underwent elective bowel resection and anastomosis by minimally invasive surgery were administered oral sulfate tablets or sodium picosulfate. Eighty-three cases were analyzed from October 2020 to December 2021. Surgical site infection within 30 days after surgery was considered the primary endpoint. Postoperative morbidities, the degree of bowel cleansing, and tolerability were the secondary endpoints. @*Results@#Surgical site infection was detected in 1 patient (2.5%) in the oral sulfate tablet group and 2 patients (4.7%) in the sodium picosulfate group, indicating no significant difference between the 2 groups. Postoperative morbidity and the degree of bowel cleansing bore no statistically significant differences. Furthermore, none of the investigated tolerability criteria, namely bloating, pain, nausea, vomiting, and discomfort, differed significantly between the 2 groups. The patients’ willingness to reuse the drug was also not significantly different between the 2 groups. @*Conclusion@#Although we could not establish the noninferiority of oral sulfate tablets to sodium picosulfate, we found no evidence suggesting that oral sulfate tablets are less safe or tolerable than sodium picosulfate in preoperative bowel preparation.

5.
Annals of Coloproctology ; : 262-265, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-937135

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Anastomotic bleeding after colorectal surgery is a rare, mostly self-limiting, postoperative complication that could lead to a life-threatening condition. Therefore, prompt management is required. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of endoscopic clipping for acute anastomotic bleeding after colorectal surgery. @*Methods@#We retrospectively reviewed the data of patients pathologically diagnosed with colorectal cancer at National Cancer Center, Korea from January 2018 to November 2020, which presented with anastomotic bleeding within the first postoperative week and were endoscopically managed with clips. @*Results@#Nine patients had anastomotic bleeding, underwent endoscopic management, and, therefore, were included in this study. All patients underwent laparoscopic (low/ultralow) anterior resection with mechanical double-stapled anastomosis. Anastomotic bleeding was successfully managed through a colonoscopy with clips on the first trial in all patients. Hypovolemic shock occurred in one patient, following anastomotic breakdown. @*Conclusion@#Endoscopic clipping seems to be an effective and safe treatment for anastomotic bleeding with minimal physiologic stress, easy accessibility, and scarce postoperative complications. However, a surgical backup should always be considered for massive bleeding.

6.
Intestinal Research ; : 171-183, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-925133

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the novel coronavirus, is threatening global health worldwide with unprecedented contagiousness and severity. The best strategy to overcome COVID-19 is a vaccine. Various vaccines are currently being developed, and mass vaccination is in progress. Despite the very encouraging clinical trial results of these vaccines, there is insufficient information on the safety and efficacy of vaccines for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients facing various issues. After reviewing current evidence and international guidelines, the Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Diseases developed an expert consensus statement on COVID-19 vaccination issues for Korean IBD patients. This expert consensus statement emphasizes that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 vaccination be strongly recommended for IBD patients, and it is safe for IBD patients receiving immunomodulatory therapy.

7.
Gut and Liver ; : 228-235, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-925003

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Small rectal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are often managed with local resection (endoscopic or transanal excision) owing to their low risk of metastasis and recurrence. However, the clinical significance of lymphovascular invasion in resected specimens remains controversial. In this study, we aimed to analyze the frequency of and risk factors for lymph node metastasis proven by histopathologic examination after radical resection. @*Methods@#We retrospectively reviewed the records of 750 patients diagnosed with a rectal NET at four academic medical centers in South Korea between 2001 and 2019. The frequency of histopathologically proven lymph node metastasis and the associated risk factors were analyzed for small tumors (≤1.5 cm) with lymphovascular invasion. @*Results@#Among 750 patients, 75 had a small tumor (≤1.5 cm) with lymphovascular invasion, of whom 31 patients underwent endoscopic resection only and 44 patients underwent additional radical surgery. Among the 41 patients who underwent surgery and had available data, the rate of regional lymph node metastasis was 48.8% (20/41). In multivariate analysis, the Ki-67 index (odds ratio, 6.279; 95% confidence interval, 1.212 to 32.528; p=0.029) was an independent risk factor for lymph node metastasis. During the mean follow-up period of 37.7 months, only one case of recurrence was detected in the surgery group. The overall survival was not significantly different between radical resection and local resection (p=0.332). @*Conclusions@#Rectal NETs with lymphovascular invasion showed a significantly high rate of regional lymph node metastasis despite their small size (≤1.5 cm).

8.
The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology ; : 105-116, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-903562

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has reduced the ability to prevent or control chronic disease due to the concerns about safety in accessing health care. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic condition requiring long- term sustained treatment, which is difficult in the current panedemic situation. The Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Diseases (KASID) has developed an expert consensus statement on the clinical practice management of adult inflammatory bowel disease during the COVID-19 pandemic. This expert consensus statement is based on guidelines and clinical reports from several countries around the world. It provides recommendations to deal with the risk of COVID-19 and medication use in IBD patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and emphasizes the importance of right treatment approach to avoid worsening of the disease condition in IBD patients.

9.
The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology ; : 117-128, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-903561

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the novel coronavirus, is threatening global health worldwide with unprecedented contagiousness and severity. The best strategy to overcome COVID-19 is a vaccine. Various vaccines are currently being developed, and mass vaccination is in progress. Despite the very encouraging clinical trial results of these vaccines, there is insufficient information on the safety and efficacy of vaccines for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients facing various issues. After reviewing current evidence and international guidelines, the Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Diseases (KASID) developed an expert consensus statement on COVID-19 vaccination issues for Korean IBD patients. This expert consensus statement emphasizes that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccination be strongly recommended for IBD patients, and it is safe for IBD patients receiving immunomodulatory therapy.

10.
Cancer Research and Treatment ; : 323-329, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-897416

ABSTRACT

At the end of 2019, the cause of pneumonia outbreaks in Wuhan, China, was identified as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. In February 2020, the World Health Organization named the disease cause by SARS-CoV-2 as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In response to the pandemic, the Korean Cancer Association formed the COVID-19 task force to develop practice guidelines. This special article introduces the clinical practice guidelines for cancer patients which will help oncologists best manage cancer patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.

11.
The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology ; : 105-116, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-895858

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has reduced the ability to prevent or control chronic disease due to the concerns about safety in accessing health care. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic condition requiring long- term sustained treatment, which is difficult in the current panedemic situation. The Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Diseases (KASID) has developed an expert consensus statement on the clinical practice management of adult inflammatory bowel disease during the COVID-19 pandemic. This expert consensus statement is based on guidelines and clinical reports from several countries around the world. It provides recommendations to deal with the risk of COVID-19 and medication use in IBD patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and emphasizes the importance of right treatment approach to avoid worsening of the disease condition in IBD patients.

12.
The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology ; : 117-128, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-895857

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the novel coronavirus, is threatening global health worldwide with unprecedented contagiousness and severity. The best strategy to overcome COVID-19 is a vaccine. Various vaccines are currently being developed, and mass vaccination is in progress. Despite the very encouraging clinical trial results of these vaccines, there is insufficient information on the safety and efficacy of vaccines for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients facing various issues. After reviewing current evidence and international guidelines, the Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Diseases (KASID) developed an expert consensus statement on COVID-19 vaccination issues for Korean IBD patients. This expert consensus statement emphasizes that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccination be strongly recommended for IBD patients, and it is safe for IBD patients receiving immunomodulatory therapy.

13.
Cancer Research and Treatment ; : 323-329, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-889712

ABSTRACT

At the end of 2019, the cause of pneumonia outbreaks in Wuhan, China, was identified as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. In February 2020, the World Health Organization named the disease cause by SARS-CoV-2 as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In response to the pandemic, the Korean Cancer Association formed the COVID-19 task force to develop practice guidelines. This special article introduces the clinical practice guidelines for cancer patients which will help oncologists best manage cancer patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.

14.
Annals of Surgical Treatment and Research ; : 44-51, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-896956

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Although many studies have evaluated the association between intestinal microorganisms and the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), only a few studies have investigated the changes in microorganisms following curative treatment for CRC. The current study analyzed changes in intestinal microbiota following curative surgery in CRC patients. @*Methods@#Stool samples were collected before and 6 months after surgery, from 11 patients with clinical stage III CRC, who underwent curative surgery between May 2017 and June 2017. Next, 16S rRNA gene sequencing was performed. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and alpha diversity were evaluated using the Shannon index. The bacterial compositions of the stools were analyzed according to taxonomic rank at genus and phylum levels. @*Results@#OTUs and alpha diversity were significantly decreased following surgery (P < 0.001 and P = 0.019, respectively). The compositions of several bacterial taxa changed after surgery. At genus level, proportions of pathogens such as Campylobacter, Fusobacterium, Haemophilus, Porphyromonas, and Prevotella, decreased after surgery (adjusted P < 0.05). At phylum level, the proportion of Fusobacteria decreased after surgery (adjusted P < 0.001). @*Conclusion@#Significant changes in intestinal microbial communities were noted following curative resection of CRC patients. Especially, decreases in pathogenic bacterial populations, such as Fusobacterium and Prevotella, which are known to be associated with CRC development, were detected even though OTUs and alpha diversity were decreased following curative resection. To determine and validate the clinical significance of these findings, large scale, prospective studies that include cancer prognoses are required.

15.
Annals of Surgical Treatment and Research ; : 44-51, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-889252

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Although many studies have evaluated the association between intestinal microorganisms and the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), only a few studies have investigated the changes in microorganisms following curative treatment for CRC. The current study analyzed changes in intestinal microbiota following curative surgery in CRC patients. @*Methods@#Stool samples were collected before and 6 months after surgery, from 11 patients with clinical stage III CRC, who underwent curative surgery between May 2017 and June 2017. Next, 16S rRNA gene sequencing was performed. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and alpha diversity were evaluated using the Shannon index. The bacterial compositions of the stools were analyzed according to taxonomic rank at genus and phylum levels. @*Results@#OTUs and alpha diversity were significantly decreased following surgery (P < 0.001 and P = 0.019, respectively). The compositions of several bacterial taxa changed after surgery. At genus level, proportions of pathogens such as Campylobacter, Fusobacterium, Haemophilus, Porphyromonas, and Prevotella, decreased after surgery (adjusted P < 0.05). At phylum level, the proportion of Fusobacteria decreased after surgery (adjusted P < 0.001). @*Conclusion@#Significant changes in intestinal microbial communities were noted following curative resection of CRC patients. Especially, decreases in pathogenic bacterial populations, such as Fusobacterium and Prevotella, which are known to be associated with CRC development, were detected even though OTUs and alpha diversity were decreased following curative resection. To determine and validate the clinical significance of these findings, large scale, prospective studies that include cancer prognoses are required.

16.
Annals of Surgical Treatment and Research ; : 199-205, 2020.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-830528

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Minute T1 colorectal cancer (CRC) lesions (≤5 mm) are rare; however, little is known about their characteristics and aggressiveness. In this study, we evaluated the characteristics of minute T1 CRC in relevance to pathology and treatment. @*Methods@#This retrospective study included 849 patients with T1 CRC endoscopically or surgically treated between January 2001 and December 2016. The patients were stratified into 4 groups according to tumor size; minute group (≤5 mm), small group (6–10 mm), medium group (11–20 mm), and large group (≥21 mm). Clinicopathological variables were evaluated with respect to tumor size. @*Results@#The incidence of the minute T1 CRC was 2.4% (20 of 849). Minute T1 CRC was significantly associated with flat type (minute, 25%; small, 12.6%; medium, 8.8%; large, 12.6%; P = 0.016), right-sided cancer (30%, 15.4%, 15.4%, 15.1%, P = 0.002) and the absence of background adenoma (BGA) (50%, 40.7%, 32.8%, 18.1%, P < 0.001). In patients who underwent surgery, lymph node metastasis (LNM) was significantly higher in the minute group (36.4%, 15.9%, 15.7%, 9.2%, P = 0.029). @*Conclusion@#Minute T1 CRC is significantly associated with flat type, right-sided cancers, as well as with the absence of BGA and LNM. These results suggested the minute T1 CRC lesions are often aggressive and are likely to be missed during colonoscopy.

17.
Korean Journal of Medicine ; : 281-286, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-938622

ABSTRACT

The incidence of rectal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) has increased worldwide, including in Korea. Rectal NETs are usually single lesions, but synchronous multiple lesions are reported in 2–4.5% of patients. Small rectal NETs (≤ 10 mm) are usually confined to the submucosal layer and rarely give rise to lymph node or distant metastases. Here we describe the case of a 54-year-old woman referred to National Cancer Center for the management of two rectal subepithelial tumors. Because computed tomography revealed a small hepatic nodule suggesting atypical hemangioma rather than metastasis, endoscopic submucosal dissection was performed. However, the size of the nodules increased during follow-up. The pathologic results of a liver biopsy confirmed metastatic NET. This case was unusual in that synchronous small rectal NETs and distant liver metastasis occurred in the absence of any risk factors for metastasis. Thus, patients with rectal NETs should be carefully evaluated, especially for the possibility of metastasis.

18.
Annals of Surgical Treatment and Research ; : 319-325, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762715

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to validate an automated calculating system developed for determining the adenoma detection rate (ADR). METHODS: To calculate the automated ADR, the data linking processes were as follows: (1) matching the selected colonoscopy results with the pathological results, (2) matching the polyp number from colonoscopy with that from pathology and confirming the histopathological results of each colonic polyp, and (3) confirming the histopathological results, especially the adenoma status of each colonic polyp. To verify the accuracy of the automated ADR calculating system, we manually calculated the ADR for 3 months through medical record review. Accuracy was calculated by measuring the error rate for each value. The cause of error was analyzed by additional order and chart review. RESULTS: After excluding 318 cases, 2,543 patients (1,351 men and 1,192 women; median age, 57.9 years) who underwent colonoscopy were included in this study. When the automated calculating system was used, polyps were found in 1,336 cases (52.6%) and adenomas were found in 1,003 cases (39.4%). When the manual calculating system was used, polyps were found in 1,327 cases (52.2%) and adenomas were found in 1,003 cases (39.4%). The accuracies of the polyp detection rate and ADR according to the automated calculating system were 99.3% and 100%, respectively. CONCLUSION: We developed a system to automatically calculate the ADR by extracting hospital electronic medical record results and verified that it provided satisfactory results. It may help to improve colonoscopy quality.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Male , Adenoma , Colon , Colonic Polyps , Colonoscopy , Colorectal Neoplasms , Electronic Health Records , Medical Records , Pathology , Polyps , Quality Improvement
19.
Korean Journal of Medicine ; : 281-286, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-759934

ABSTRACT

The incidence of rectal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) has increased worldwide, including in Korea. Rectal NETs are usually single lesions, but synchronous multiple lesions are reported in 2–4.5% of patients. Small rectal NETs (≤ 10 mm) are usually confined to the submucosal layer and rarely give rise to lymph node or distant metastases. Here we describe the case of a 54-year-old woman referred to National Cancer Center for the management of two rectal subepithelial tumors. Because computed tomography revealed a small hepatic nodule suggesting atypical hemangioma rather than metastasis, endoscopic submucosal dissection was performed. However, the size of the nodules increased during follow-up. The pathologic results of a liver biopsy confirmed metastatic NET. This case was unusual in that synchronous small rectal NETs and distant liver metastasis occurred in the absence of any risk factors for metastasis. Thus, patients with rectal NETs should be carefully evaluated, especially for the possibility of metastasis.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Biopsy , Follow-Up Studies , Hemangioma , Incidence , Korea , Liver , Lymph Nodes , Neoplasm Metastasis , Neuroendocrine Tumors , Rectum , Risk Factors
20.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 73-78, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-719379

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Prior abdomino-pelvic (AP) surgery makes colonoscopy difficult and can affect bowel preparation quality. However, bowel preparation quality has been found to vary according to prior AP surgery type. We examined the relationship of prior AP surgery type with bowel preparation quality in a large-scale retrospective cohort. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In the health screening cohort of the National Cancer Center, 12881 participants who underwent screening or surveillance colonoscopy between June 2007 and December 2014 were included. Personal data were collected by reviewing patient medical records. Bowel preparation quality was assessed using the Aronchick scale and was categorized as satisfactory for excellent to good bowel preparation or unsatisfactory for fair to inadequate bowel preparation. RESULTS: A total of 1557 (12.1%) participants had a history of AP surgery. The surgery types were colorectal surgery (n=44), gastric/small intestinal surgery (n=125), appendectomy/peritoneum/laparotomy (n=476), cesarean section (n=278), uterus/ovarian surgery (n=317), kidney/bladder/prostate surgery (n=19), or liver/pancreatobiliary surgery (n=96). The proportion of satisfactory bowel preparations was 70.7%. In multivariate analysis, unsatisfactory bowel preparation was related to gastric/small intestinal surgery (odds ratio=1.764, 95% confidence interval=1.230–2.532, p=0.002). However, the other surgery types did not affect bowel preparation quality. Current smoking, diabetes, and high body mass index were risk factors of unacceptable bowel preparation. CONCLUSION: Only gastric/small intestinal surgery was a potential risk factor for poor bowel preparation. Further research on patients with a history of gastric/small intestinal surgery to determine appropriate methods for adequate bowel preparation is mandatory.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Body Mass Index , Cesarean Section , Cohort Studies , Colonoscopy , Colorectal Surgery , Mass Screening , Medical Records , Multivariate Analysis , Postoperative Period , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Smoke , Smoking
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