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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-835900

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The purpose of the this study was to examine the dietary knowledge and educational needs of stroke patients and analyze the related factors that are associated with dietary knowledge and educational needs. @*Methods@#Our study analyzed data from 146 stroke patients. The survey was conducted by individual interviews using questionnaires and data collected from participants’ medical records. Dietary knowledge and educational needs were measured by tools developed by the author. @*Results@#The mean scores for the dietary knowledge and educational needs were 19.09± 3.48 and 36.17± 7.18, respectively. Many stroke patients had misconceptions about soy sauce, cholesterol, and fruits. The most needed items in dietary education was first identifying foods that are beneficial or harmful, and second, food interaction with medications. As for the results of multiple regressions, dietary knowledge was significantly associated with gender, educational attainment, monthly income, exercise, body mass index, and level of compliance to dietary therapy. Additionally, the educational needs were significantly related with educational attainment and employment. @*Conclusion@#For secondary prevention of stroke patients, education strategy considering dietary knowledge and educational needs of stroke patients should be established. Special attention is needed for stroke patients with a lower level of dietary knowledge and educational needs.

2.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-834845

ABSTRACT

Endovascular recanalization therapy (ERT) has been a standard of care for patients with acute ischemic stroke due to large artery occlusion (LAO) within 6 hours after onset since the five landmark ERT trials up to 2015 demonstrated its clinical benefit. Recently, two randomized clinical trials demonstrated that ERT, even in the late time window up to 16 hours or 24 hours after last known normal time, improved the outcome of patients who had a target mismatch defined as either clinical-core mismatch or perfusion-core mismatch, which prompted the update of national guidelines in several countries. Accordingly, to provide evidence-based and up-to-date recommendations for ERT in patients with acute LAO in Korea, the Clinical Practice Guidelines Committee of the Korean Stroke Society decided to revise the previous Korean Clinical Practice Guidelines of Stroke for ERT. For this update, the members of the writing group were appointed by the Korean Stroke Society and the Korean Society of Interventional Neuroradiology. After thorough reviewing the updated evidence from two recent trials and relevant literature, the writing members revised recommendations, for which formal consensus was achieved by convening an expert panel composed of 45 experts from the participating academic societies. The current guidelines are intended to help healthcare providers, patients, and their caregivers make their well-informed decisions and to improve the quality of care regarding ERT. The ultimate decision for ERT in a particular patient must be made in light of circumstances specific to that patient.

3.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-831618

ABSTRACT

Background@#Neurocritical care by dedicated neurointensivists may improve outcomes of critically ill patients with severe brain injury. In this study, we aimed to validate whether neurointensive care could improve the outcome in patients with critically ill acute ischemic stroke using the linked big dataset on stroke in Korea. @*Methods@#We included 1,405 acute ischemic stroke patients with mechanical ventilator support in the intensive care unit after an index stroke. Patients were retrieved from linking the Clinical Research Center for Stroke Registry and the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service data from the period between January 2007 and December 2014. The outcomes were mortality at discharge and at 3 months after an index stroke. The main outcomes were compared between the centers with and without dedicated neurointensivists. @*Results@#Among the included patients, 303 (21.6%) were admitted to the centers with dedicated neurointensivists. The patients treated by dedicated neurointensivists had significantly lower in-hospital mortality (18.3% vs. 26.8%, P = 0.002) as well as lower mortality at 3-month (38.0% vs. 49.1%, P < 0.001) than those who were treated without neurointensivists. After adjusting for confounders, a treatment without neurointensivists was independently associated with higher in-hospital mortality (odds ratio [OR], 1.59; 95% confidence intervals [CIs], 1.13–2.25; P = 0.008) and 3-month mortality (OR, 1.48; 95% CIs, 1.12–1.95; P = 0.005). @*Conclusion@#Treatment by dedicated neurointensivists is associated with lower in-hospital and 3-month mortality using the linked big datasets for stroke in Korea. This finding stresses the importance of neurointensivists in treating patients with severe ischemic stroke.

4.
Neurointervention ; : 71-81, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-760600

ABSTRACT

Endovascular recanalization therapy (ERT) has been a standard of care for patients with acute ischemic stroke due to large artery occlusion (LAO) within 6 hours after onset, since five landmark ERT trials conducted by 2015 demonstrated its clinical benefit. Recently, two randomized clinical trials demonstrated that ERT, even in the late time window of up to 16 hours or 24 hours after last known normal time, improved the outcome of patients who had a target mismatch, defined as either clinical-core mismatch or perfusion-core mismatch, which prompted the update of national guidelines in several countries. Accordingly, to provide evidence-based and up-to-date recommendations for ERT in patients with acute LAO in Korea, the Clinical Practice Guidelines Committee of the Korean Stroke Society decided to revise the previous Korean Clinical Practice Guidelines of Stroke for ERT. For this update, the members of the writing group were appointed by the Korean Stroke Society and the Korean Society of Interventional Neuroradiology. After thoroughly reviewing the updated evidence from two recent trials and relevant literature, the writing members revised recommendations, for which formal consensus was achieved by convening an expert panel composed of 45 experts from the participating academic societies. The current guidelines are intended to help healthcare providers, patients, and their caregivers make well-informed decisions and to improve the quality of care regarding ERT. The ultimate decision for ERT in a particular patient must be made in light of circumstances specific to that patient.


Subject(s)
Arteries , Caregivers , Cerebral Infarction , Consensus , Health Personnel , Humans , Korea , Mechanical Thrombolysis , Reperfusion , Standard of Care , Stroke , Writing
5.
Journal of Stroke ; : 231-240, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-766240

ABSTRACT

Endovascular recanalization therapy (ERT) has been a standard of care for patients with acute ischemic stroke due to large artery occlusion (LAO) within 6 hours after onset, since five landmark ERT trials conducted by 2015 demonstrated its clinical benefit. Recently, two randomized clinical trials demonstrated that ERT, even in the late time window of up to 16 hours or 24 hours after last known normal time, improved the outcome of patients who had a target mismatch, defined as either clinical-core mismatch or perfusion-core mismatch, which prompted the update of national guidelines in several countries. Accordingly, to provide evidence-based and up-to-date recommendations for ERT in patients with acute LAO in Korea, the Clinical Practice Guidelines Committee of the Korean Stroke Society decided to revise the previous Korean Clinical Practice Guidelines of Stroke for ERT. For this update, the members of the writing group were appointed by the Korean Stroke Society and the Korean Society of Interventional Neuroradiology. After thoroughly reviewing the updated evidence from two recent trials and relevant literature, the writing members revised recommendations, for which formal consensus was achieved by convening an expert panel composed of 45 experts from the participating academic societies. The current guidelines are intended to help healthcare providers, patients, and their caregivers make well-informed decisions and to improve the quality of care regarding ERT. The ultimate decision for ERT in a particular patient must be made in light of circumstances specific to that patient.


Subject(s)
Arteries , Caregivers , Cerebral Infarction , Consensus , Health Personnel , Humans , Korea , Mechanical Thrombolysis , Reperfusion , Standard of Care , Stroke , Writing
6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-718369

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Linkage of public healthcare data is useful in stroke research because patients may visit different sectors of the health system before, during, and after stroke. Therefore, we aimed to establish high-quality big data on stroke in Korea by linking acute stroke registry and national health claim databases. METHODS: Acute stroke patients (n = 65,311) with claim data suitable for linkage were included in the Clinical Research Center for Stroke (CRCS) registry during 2006–2014. We linked the CRCS registry with national health claim databases in the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA). Linkage was performed using 6 common variables: birth date, gender, provider identification, receiving year and number, and statement serial number in the benefit claim statement. For matched records, linkage accuracy was evaluated using differences between hospital visiting date in the CRCS registry and the commencement date for health insurance care in HIRA. RESULTS: Of 65,311 CRCS cases, 64,634 were matched to HIRA cases (match rate, 99.0%). The proportion of true matches was 94.4% (n = 61,017) in the matched data. Among true matches (mean age 66.4 years; men 58.4%), the median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 3 (interquartile range 1–7). When comparing baseline characteristics between true matches and false matches, no substantial difference was observed for any variable. CONCLUSION: We could establish big data on stroke by linking CRCS registry and HIRA records, using claims data without personal identifiers. We plan to conduct national stroke research and improve stroke care using the linked big database.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Information Storage and Retrieval , Insurance, Health , Korea , Male , National Health Programs , Parturition , Stroke
7.
Journal of Stroke ; : 142-142, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-740600

ABSTRACT

On page 287, “The lowest rates are observed in Japan (43.4/1,000,000 person-years and Singapore (47.9/100,000 person-years), followed by Bangladesh, Papua New Guinea, and Bhutan.” sentence should be corrected.

8.
Journal of Stroke ; : 286-294, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-51271

ABSTRACT

Asia, which holds 60% of the world’s population, comprises some developing countries which are in economic transition. This paper reviews the epidemiology of stroke in South, East and South-East Asia. Data on the epidemiology of stroke in South, East, and South-East Asia were derived from the Global Burden of Disease study (mortality, disability-adjusted life-years [DALYs] lost because of stroke), World Health Organization (vascular risk factors in the community), and publications in PubMed (incidence, prevalence, subtypes, vascular risk factors among hospitalized stroke patients). Age- and sex-standardized mortality is the lowest in Japan, and highest in Mongolia. Community-based incidence data of only a few countries are available, with the lowest rates being observed in Malaysia, and the highest in Japan and Taiwan. The availability of prevalence data is higher than incidence data, but different study methods were used for case-finding, with different age bands. For DALYs, Japan has the lowest rates, and Mongolia the highest. For community, a high prevalence of hypertension is seen in Mongolia and Pakistan; diabetes mellitus in Papua New Guinea, Pakistan, and Mongolia; hypercholesterolemia in Japan, Singapore, and Brunei; inactivity in Malaysia; obesity in Brunei, Papua New Guinea, and Mongolia; tobacco smoking in Indonesia. Hypertension is the most frequent risk factor, followed by diabetes mellitus and smoking. Ischemic stroke occurs more frequently than hemorrhagic stroke, and subarachnoid hemorrhages are uncommon. There are variations in the stroke epidemiology between countries in South, East, and South-East Asia. Further research on stroke burden is required.


Subject(s)
Asia , Brunei , Cerebrovascular Disorders , Developing Countries , Diabetes Mellitus , Epidemiology , Hypercholesterolemia , Hypertension , Incidence , Indonesia , Japan , Malaysia , Mongolia , Mortality , Obesity , Pakistan , Papua New Guinea , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Singapore , Smoke , Smoking , Stroke , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage , Taiwan , World Health Organization
9.
Journal of Stroke ; : 295-303, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-51270

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Many studies have evaluated the association between weather and stroke, with variable conclusions. Herein we determined the relationships between daily meteorological parameters and acute stroke incidence in South Korea. METHODS: Patients with acute stroke (2,894) were identified by standard sampling of a nationwide insurance claims database from January to December 2011. We used multiple Poisson regression analyses of stroke incidence and meteorological parameters (mean temperature, diurnal temperature change, temperature differences over the preceding 24 hours, atmospheric pressure, humidity, wind speed, and physiologically equivalent temperature) to calculate the relative risk of stroke incidence associated with meteorological parameters. RESULTS: There were no seasonal variations in the incidences of ischemic (2,176) or hemorrhagic (718) stroke. Temperature change during the day was positively correlated with ischemic stroke in men (relative risk [RR] 1.027; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.006–1.05) and older patients (≥65 years) (RR 1.031, 95% CI 1.011–1.052). Temperature differences over the preceding 24 hours had a negative correlation with all strokes (RR 0.968, 95% CI 0.941–0.996), especially among older women. Diurnal variation of atmospheric pressure was also significantly associated with the incidence of ischemic stroke (age < 65 years, RR 1.051, 95% CI 1.011–1.092; age≥65 years, RR 0.966, 95% CI 0.936–0.997). CONCLUSIONS: Diurnal temperature change, temperature differences over the preceding 24 hours, and diurnal variation of atmospheric pressure were associated with daily stroke incidence. These findings may enhance our understanding of the relationship between stroke and weather.


Subject(s)
Atmospheric Pressure , Cerebral Hemorrhage , Cerebral Infarction , Female , Humans , Humidity , Incidence , Insurance , Insurance, Health , Korea , Male , Seasons , Stroke , Weather , Wind
10.
Journal of Stroke ; : 3-10, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-121547

ABSTRACT

Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the second most common subtype of stroke and a critical disease usually leading to severe disability or death. ICH is more common in Asians, advanced age, male sex, and low- and middle-income countries. The case fatality rate of ICH is high (40% at 1 month and 54% at 1 year), and only 12% to 39% of survivors can achieve long-term functional independence. Risk factors of ICH are hypertension, current smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, hypocholesterolemia, and drugs. Old age, male sex, Asian ethnicity, chronic kidney disease, cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) increase the risk of ICH. Clinical presentation varies according to the size and location of hematoma, and intraventricular extension of hemorrhage. Patients with CAA-related ICH frequently have concomitant cognitive impairment. Anticoagulation related ICH is increasing recently as the elderly population who have atrial fibrillation is increasing. As non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are currently replacing warfarin, management of NOAC-associated ICH has become an emerging issue.


Subject(s)
Aged , Alcohol Drinking , Anticoagulants , Asian Continental Ancestry Group , Atrial Fibrillation , Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy , Cerebral Hemorrhage , Cognition Disorders , Epidemiology , Hematoma , Hemorrhage , Humans , Hypertension , Incidence , Male , Mortality , Neurologic Manifestations , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic , Risk Factors , Smoke , Smoking , Stroke , Survivors , Warfarin
11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-72142

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The quality of anticoagulation is critical for ensuring the benefit of warfarin, but this has been less well studied in Korean ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). METHODS: This study retrospectively analyzed the data of patients who had an AF-related ischemic stroke and were treated with long-term warfarin therapy in 16 Korean centers. The quality of warfarin therapy was primarily assessed by the time in therapeutic range [TTR; international normalized ratio (INR), 2.0–3.0] and additionally by the proportion of INR values within the therapeutic range. RESULTS: The long-term warfarin-treated cohort comprised 1,230 patients. They were aged 70.1±9.7 years (mean±SD), 42.5% were female, and their CHA₂DS₂-VASc score was 4.75±1.41. The TTR analysis included 33,941 INR measurements for 27,487 months: per patients, 27.6 (SD, 22.4) INR measurements for 22.4 (SD, 12.9) months. The mean TTR of individual patients was 49.1% (95% confidence interval, 47.9–50.3%), and the TTR quartiles were 64.5%. None of the 16 centers achieved a mean TTR of >60%. Of all INR measurements, 44.6% were within the therapeutic range, 41.7% were 3.0. CONCLUSIONS: In Korean ischemic stroke patients who had AF, the quality of warfarin therapy was low and might be inadequate to effectively prevent recurrent stroke or systemic embolism.


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation , Cohort Studies , Embolism , Female , Humans , International Normalized Ratio , Observational Study , Retrospective Studies , Stroke , Warfarin
12.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-182777

ABSTRACT

Patients with severe stroke due to acute large cerebral artery occlusion are likely to be severely disabled or die if reperfusion is not achieved in a timely manner. Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-TPA) administered within 4.5 hours after stroke onset was previously the only proven therapy, but IV-TPA alone does not sufficiently improve the outcome of patients with acute large artery occlusion. With the introduction of the advanced endovascular therapy that enables faster and more successful recanalization, recent randomized trials consecutively and consistently demonstrated the benefit of adding endovascular recanalization therapy (ERT) to IV-TPA. Accordingly, to update the recommendations, we assembled members of a writing committee appointed by the Korean Stroke Society, the Korean Society of Interventional Neuroradiology, and the Society of Korean Endovascular Neurosurgeons. The writing committee revised recommendations based on a review of the accumulated evidence, and a formal consensus was achieved by convening a panel of 34 experts from the participating academic societies. The current guideline provides evidence-based recommendations for ERT in patients with acute large cerebral artery occlusion regarding patient selection, treatment modalities, neuroimaging evaluation, and system organization.


Subject(s)
Arteries , Cerebral Arteries , Consensus , Humans , Neuroimaging , Neurosurgeons , Patient Selection , Reperfusion , Stroke , Tissue Plasminogen Activator , Writing
13.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-197555

ABSTRACT

Ischemic stroke and myocardial infarction share common risk factors and pathophysiologic mechanisms. Unrecognized coronary artery disease typically occurs in 20-30% of patients with ischemic stroke, and its presence helps to predict the outcome. Coronary artery disease is also an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with ischemic stroke. Therefore, applying a screening test for asymptomatic coronary artery disease may be considered in ischemic stroke patients who have a high cardiovascular risk profile. Coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography, myocardial perfusion imaging, or stress echocardiography can be used as a screening test. Coronary CT angiography is recommended in the absence of allergy to contrast media and renal insufficiency.


Subject(s)
Angiography , Contrast Media , Coronary Artery Disease , Coronary Vessels , Echocardiography, Stress , Humans , Hypersensitivity , Mass Screening , Mortality , Myocardial Infarction , Myocardial Perfusion Imaging , Renal Insufficiency , Risk Factors , Stroke
14.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-197546

ABSTRACT

We present a case report indicating that the administration of phentermine, an appetite suppressant with sympathomimetic activity, can provoke an intracerebral hemorrhage. A 48-year-old woman with no previously established cerebrovascular risk fa ctors and who had taken phentermine for 30 days developed sudden-onset left hemiparesis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed an acute intracerebral hemorrhage involving the right thalamus. This case indicates that physicians should be aware of the relevant cause of medication history including appetite suppressants in young patients with an acute intracerebral hemorrhage.


Subject(s)
Appetite Depressants , Appetite , Brain , Cerebral Hemorrhage , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Middle Aged , Paresis , Phentermine , Thalamus
15.
Journal of Stroke ; : 87-95, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-135881

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The benefit of statins in acute stroke remains uncertain. Statins may prevent stroke recurrence during the acute stage of stroke via pleiotropic effects. However, statins may increase the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. We investigated the effect and safety of rosuvastatin in acute stroke patients. METHODS: This randomized, double-blind, multi-center trial compared rosuvastatin 20 mg and placebo in statin-naive stroke patients who underwent diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) within 48 hours after symptom onset. The primary outcome was occurrence of new ischemic lesions on DWI at 5 or 14 days. RESULTS: This trial was stopped early after randomization of 316 patients due to slow enrollment. Among 289 patients with at least one follow-up imaging, the frequency of new ischemic lesions on DWI was not different between groups (rosuvastatin: 27/137, 19.7% vs. placebo: 36/152, 23.6%) (relative risk 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.53-1.30). Infarct volume growth at 5 days (log-transformed volume change, rosuvastatin: 0.2+/-1.0 mm3 vs. placebo: 0.3+/-1.3 mm3; P=0.784) was not different, either. However, hemorrhagic infarction or parenchymal/subarachnoid hemorrhage on gradient-recalled echo magnetic resonance imaging occurred less frequently in the rosuvastatin group (6/137, 4.4%) than the placebo group (22/152, 14.5%, P=0.007). Among 314 patients with at least one dose of study medication, progression or clinical recurrence of stroke tended to occur less frequently in the rosuvastatin group (1/155, 0.6% vs. 7/159, 4.4%, P=0.067). Adverse events did not differ between groups. CONCLUSIONS: The efficacy of rosuvastatin in reducing recurrence in acute stroke was inconclusive. However, statin use was safe and reduced hemorrhagic transformation.


Subject(s)
Cerebral Hemorrhage , Follow-Up Studies , Hemorrhage , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors , Infarction , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Random Allocation , Recurrence , Stroke , Rosuvastatin Calcium
16.
Journal of Stroke ; : 102-113, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-135877

ABSTRACT

Patients with severe stroke due to acute large cerebral artery occlusion are likely to be severely disabled or dead without timely reperfusion. Previously, intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-TPA) within 4.5 hours after stroke onset was the only proven therapy, but IV-TPA alone does not sufficiently improve the outcome of patients with acute large artery occlusion. With the introduction of the advanced endovascular therapy, which enables more fast and more successful recanalization, recent randomized trials consecutively and consistently demonstrated the benefit of endovascular recanalization therapy (ERT) when added to IV-TPA. Accordingly, to update the recommendations, we assembled members of the writing committee appointed by the Korean Stroke Society, the Korean Society of Interventional Neuroradiology, and the Society of Korean Endovascular Neurosurgeons. Reviewing the evidences that have been accumulated, the writing members revised recommendations, for which formal consensus was achieved by convening a panel composed of 34 experts from the participating academic societies. The current guideline provides the evidence-based recommendations for ERT in patients with acute large cerebral artery occlusion regarding patient selection, treatment modalities, neuroimaging evaluation, and system organization.


Subject(s)
Arteries , Cerebral Arteries , Consensus , Humans , Neuroimaging , Patient Selection , Reperfusion , Stroke , Tissue Plasminogen Activator , Writing
17.
Journal of Stroke ; : 87-95, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-135876

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The benefit of statins in acute stroke remains uncertain. Statins may prevent stroke recurrence during the acute stage of stroke via pleiotropic effects. However, statins may increase the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. We investigated the effect and safety of rosuvastatin in acute stroke patients. METHODS: This randomized, double-blind, multi-center trial compared rosuvastatin 20 mg and placebo in statin-naive stroke patients who underwent diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) within 48 hours after symptom onset. The primary outcome was occurrence of new ischemic lesions on DWI at 5 or 14 days. RESULTS: This trial was stopped early after randomization of 316 patients due to slow enrollment. Among 289 patients with at least one follow-up imaging, the frequency of new ischemic lesions on DWI was not different between groups (rosuvastatin: 27/137, 19.7% vs. placebo: 36/152, 23.6%) (relative risk 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.53-1.30). Infarct volume growth at 5 days (log-transformed volume change, rosuvastatin: 0.2+/-1.0 mm3 vs. placebo: 0.3+/-1.3 mm3; P=0.784) was not different, either. However, hemorrhagic infarction or parenchymal/subarachnoid hemorrhage on gradient-recalled echo magnetic resonance imaging occurred less frequently in the rosuvastatin group (6/137, 4.4%) than the placebo group (22/152, 14.5%, P=0.007). Among 314 patients with at least one dose of study medication, progression or clinical recurrence of stroke tended to occur less frequently in the rosuvastatin group (1/155, 0.6% vs. 7/159, 4.4%, P=0.067). Adverse events did not differ between groups. CONCLUSIONS: The efficacy of rosuvastatin in reducing recurrence in acute stroke was inconclusive. However, statin use was safe and reduced hemorrhagic transformation.


Subject(s)
Cerebral Hemorrhage , Follow-Up Studies , Hemorrhage , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors , Infarction , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Random Allocation , Recurrence , Stroke , Rosuvastatin Calcium
18.
Journal of Stroke ; : 102-113, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-135872

ABSTRACT

Patients with severe stroke due to acute large cerebral artery occlusion are likely to be severely disabled or dead without timely reperfusion. Previously, intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-TPA) within 4.5 hours after stroke onset was the only proven therapy, but IV-TPA alone does not sufficiently improve the outcome of patients with acute large artery occlusion. With the introduction of the advanced endovascular therapy, which enables more fast and more successful recanalization, recent randomized trials consecutively and consistently demonstrated the benefit of endovascular recanalization therapy (ERT) when added to IV-TPA. Accordingly, to update the recommendations, we assembled members of the writing committee appointed by the Korean Stroke Society, the Korean Society of Interventional Neuroradiology, and the Society of Korean Endovascular Neurosurgeons. Reviewing the evidences that have been accumulated, the writing members revised recommendations, for which formal consensus was achieved by convening a panel composed of 34 experts from the participating academic societies. The current guideline provides the evidence-based recommendations for ERT in patients with acute large cerebral artery occlusion regarding patient selection, treatment modalities, neuroimaging evaluation, and system organization.


Subject(s)
Arteries , Cerebral Arteries , Consensus , Humans , Neuroimaging , Patient Selection , Reperfusion , Stroke , Tissue Plasminogen Activator , Writing
19.
Korean Journal of Medicine ; : 427-432, 2016.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-96323

ABSTRACT

Bee venom-induced anaphylaxis usually causes urticaria, angioedema, respiratory distress, nausea, and vomiting. Occasionally, it leads to unusual complications such as acute myocardial infarction, takotsubo cardiomyopathy, arrhythmia, rhabdomyolysis, intravascular hemolysis, and acute kidney injury. Renal complications are rare, and there are only two cases of acute kidney injury associated with rhabdomyolysis due to multiple bee stings reported in Korea. We report a 67-year-old woman who presented at our emergency department with confusion, respiratory distress, and dizziness after multiple bee stings. She was diagnosed with anaphylactic shock. There was acute kidney injury associated with rhabdomyolysis and heart failure related to takotsubo cardiomyopathy, all of which indicated unusual and fatal complications. Her condition worsened, almost requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. However, the patient recovered without cardiac or renal complications within 30 days of therapy with hydration and diuretics.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , Aged , Anaphylaxis , Angioedema , Arrhythmias, Cardiac , Bee Venoms , Bees , Bites and Stings , Diuretics , Dizziness , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Heart Failure , Hemolysis , Humans , Intubation , Korea , Myocardial Infarction , Nausea , Respiration, Artificial , Rhabdomyolysis , Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy , Urticaria , Vomiting
20.
The Ewha Medical Journal ; : 104-109, 2016.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-84902

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Advance directives (AD) are designed to protect patients’ autonomy and self-determination, which mean the end of life care planning should precede before loss of their decision ability. We aimed to analyze our experience of AD at field of oncology, focusing on preference of end-of-life care and outcome in advanced cancer patients. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted on advanced cancer patients who underwent AD at the department of Oncology of Hanil General Hospital, between April 2013 and January 2014. AD are composed of decision about end of life care (resuscitation, ventilator, artificial tube feeding) and determination of proxy. RESULTS: Among 23 patients who were recommended AD during study period, 19 patients (83%) successfully underwent AD. The median age was 67 years (range, 50 to 95 years) and male was predominance (84%) was observed. Most of them (90%) have not heard of AD in the past. With regard to decision of end-of-life care, decision for resuscitation and ventilator were selected only by 1 patient (5%), respectively, while 10 patients (52%) decided to receive tube feeding. Among 5 patients who underwent AD during chemotherapy, there was neither transfer to other hospital for anti-cancer treatment nor follow up loss. CONCLUSION: AD might be applicable in advanced cancer patients at field of oncology, including also patients treated with palliative chemotherapy.


Subject(s)
Advance Directives , Drug Therapy , Enteral Nutrition , Follow-Up Studies , Hospitals, General , Humans , Male , Proxy , Resuscitation , Retrospective Studies , Terminal Care , Ventilators, Mechanical
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