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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-891187

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The outcomes of non-trauma patients requiring intra-abdominal gauze packing for the management of uncontrollable hemorrhage following surgery, and the evaluation of survival risk factors were examined. @*Methods@#Data from patients who underwent intra-abdominal gauze packing to control bleeding during abdominal surgery between September 2012 and March 2019 were retrospectively reviewed. @*Results@#A total of 28 patients were included in the study population analysis. There were 9 patients who died during hospitalization. One patient died as a result of uncontrolled bleeding. In spite of gauze packing, 2 patients who had increasing blood transfusion requirements (> 4 packs/4 hours) were found to have arterial bleeding. Univariate analysis for hospital death showed that immunocompromised status, emergency surgery, a thrombocytopenic state prior to initial surgery, and a longer duration until gauze removal had a negative association with survival outcomes. Among these factors, only time to gauze removal > 36 hours was identified as an independent risk factor for survival outcome in the multivariate analysis. @*Conclusions@#Gauze packing could be considered as an effective method for the management of uncontrolled hemorrhage, in non-trauma patients. In cases of persistent bleeding after gauze packing, arterial bleeding should be suspected. Gauze removal after > 36 hours may indicate a poor survival outcome.

2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-913521

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#During diverting ileostomy reversal for rectal cancer patients who underwent previous sphincter-saving surgery, the extent of adhesion formation around the ileostomy site affects operative and postoperative outcomes. Anchoring sutures placed at the time of the ileostomy procedure may reduce adhesions around the ileostomy. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of anchoring sutures on the degree of adhesion formation and the postoperative course at the time of ileostomy reversal. @*Methods@#Patients who underwent sphincter-saving surgery with diverting ileostomy for rectal cancer between January 2013 and December 2017 were enrolled. Variables including the peritoneal adhesion index (PAI) score, operation time, the length of resected small bowel, operative complications, and postoperative hospital stay were collected prospectively and compared between the anchoring group (AG) and non-anchoring group (NAG). @*Results@#A total of 90 patients were included in this study, with 60 and 30 patients in the AG and NAG, respectively. The AG had shorter mean operation time (46.88 ± 16.37 minutes vs. 61.53 ± 19.36 minutes, P = 0.001) and lower mean PAI score (3.02 ± 2.53 vs. 5.80 ± 2.60, P = 0.001), compared with the NAG. There was no significant difference in the incidence of postoperative complications between the AG and NAG (5.0% vs. 13.3%, respectively; P = 0.240). @*Conclusion@#Anchoring sutures at the formation of a diverting ileostomy could decrease the adhesion score and operation time at ileostomy reversal, thus may be effective in improving perioperative outcomes.

3.
Annals of Coloproctology ; : 101-108, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-913383

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Carcinoma arising from Crohn disease (CD) is rare, and there is no clear guidance on how to properly screen for at-risk patients and choose appropriate care. This study aimed to evaluate the clinicopathological characteristics, treatment, and oncologic outcomes of CD patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC). @*Methods@#Using medical records, we retrospectively enrolled a single-center cohort of 823 patients who underwent abdominal surgery for CD between January 2006 and December 2015. CD-associated CRC patients included those with adenocarcinoma, lymphoma, or neuroendocrine tumors of the colon and rectum. @*Results@#Nineteen patients (2.3%) underwent abdominal surgery to treat CD-associated CRC. The mean duration of CD in the CD-associated CRC group was significantly longer than that in the benign CD group (124.7 ± 77.7 months vs. 68.9 ± 60.2 months, P = 0.006). The CD-associated CRC group included a higher proportion of patients with a history of perianal disease (73.7% vs. 50.2%, P = 0.035) and colonic location (47.4% vs. 6.5%, P = 0.001). Among 19 CD-associated CRC patients, 17 (89.5%) were diagnosed with adenocarcinoma, and of the 17 cases, 15 (88.2%) were rectal adenocarcinoma. On multivariable analyses for developing CRC, only colonic location was a risk factor (relative risk, 7.735; 95% confidence interval, 2.862–20.903; P = 0.001). @*Conclusion@#Colorectal malignancy is rare among CD patients, even among patients who undergo abdominal surgery. Rectal adenocarcinoma accounted for most of the CRC, and colonic location was a risk factor for developing CRC.

4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-898891

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The outcomes of non-trauma patients requiring intra-abdominal gauze packing for the management of uncontrollable hemorrhage following surgery, and the evaluation of survival risk factors were examined. @*Methods@#Data from patients who underwent intra-abdominal gauze packing to control bleeding during abdominal surgery between September 2012 and March 2019 were retrospectively reviewed. @*Results@#A total of 28 patients were included in the study population analysis. There were 9 patients who died during hospitalization. One patient died as a result of uncontrolled bleeding. In spite of gauze packing, 2 patients who had increasing blood transfusion requirements (> 4 packs/4 hours) were found to have arterial bleeding. Univariate analysis for hospital death showed that immunocompromised status, emergency surgery, a thrombocytopenic state prior to initial surgery, and a longer duration until gauze removal had a negative association with survival outcomes. Among these factors, only time to gauze removal > 36 hours was identified as an independent risk factor for survival outcome in the multivariate analysis. @*Conclusions@#Gauze packing could be considered as an effective method for the management of uncontrolled hemorrhage, in non-trauma patients. In cases of persistent bleeding after gauze packing, arterial bleeding should be suspected. Gauze removal after > 36 hours may indicate a poor survival outcome.

5.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-831042

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#We evaluated the association of body composition with long-term oncologic outcomes innon-metastatic rectal cancer patients. @*Materials and Methods@#We included 1,384 patients with stage(y)0-III rectal cancer treated at Asan Medical Centerbetween January 2005 and December 2012. Body composition at diagnosis was measuredusing abdomino-pelvic computed tomography (CT). Sarcopenia, visceral obesity (VO), andsarcopenic obesity (SO) were defined using CT measured parameters such as skeletal muscleindex (total abdominal muscle area, TAMA), visceral fat area (VFA), and VFA/TAMA. Inflammatorystatus was defined as a neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio of ! 3. Obesity was categorizedby body mass index (! 25 kg/m2). @*Results@#Among the 1,384 patients, 944 (68.2%) had sarcopenia and 307 (22.2%) had SO. The5-year overall survival (OS) rate was significantly lower in sarcopenic patients (no sarcopeniavs. sarcopenia; 84% vs. 78%, p=0.003) but the 5-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) ratewas not different (77.3% vs. 77.9% p=0.957). Patients with SO showed lower 5-year OS(79.1% vs. 75.5% p=0.02) but no difference in 5-year RFS (p=0.957). Sarcopenia, SO, VO,and obesity were not associated with RFS. However, obesity, SO, age, sex, inflammatorystatus, and tumor stage were confirmed as independent factors associated with OS on multivariateanalysis. In subgroup analysis, association of SO with OS was more prominent inpatients with (y)p stage 0-2 and no inflammatory status. @*Conclusion@#The presence of SO and a low body mass index at diagnosis are negatively associated withOS in non-metastatic rectal cancer patients.

6.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-830385

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#This study aimed to compare the short-term outcomes of the open and laparoscopic approaches to 2-stage restorative proctocolectomy (RPC) for Korean patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). @*Methods@#We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 73 patients with UC who underwent elective RPC between 2009 and 2016. Patient characteristics, operative details, and postoperative complications within 30 days were compared between the open and laparoscopic groups. @*Results@#There were 26 cases (36%) in the laparoscopic group, which had a lower mean body mass index (P = 0.025), faster mean time to recovery of bowel function (P = 0.004), less intraoperative blood loss (P = 0.004), and less pain on the first and seventh postoperative days (P = 0.029 and P = 0.027, respectively) compared to open group. There were no deaths, and the overall complication rate was 43.8%. There was no between-group difference in the overall complication rate; however, postoperative ileus was more frequent in the open group (27.7% vs. 7.7%, P = 0.043). Current smoking (odds ratio [OR], 44.4; P = 0.003) and open surgery (OR, 5.4; P = 0.014) were the independent risk factors for postoperative complications after RPC. @*Conclusion@#Laparoscopic RPC was associated with acceptable morbidity and faster recovery than the open approach. The laparoscopic approach is a feasible and safe option for surgical treatment for UC in selective cases.

7.
Annals of Coloproctology ; : 243-248, 2020.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-830378

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract involvement in Crohn disease (CD) is rare and effectiveness of surgical treatment is limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate characteristics and surgical outcomes of upper GI CD. @*Methods@#Medical records of 811 patients who underwent intestinal surgery for CD between January 2006 and December 2015 at a single institution were reviewed. Upper GI CD was defined by involvement of the stomach to the fourth portion of duodenum, with or without concomitant small/large bowel CD involvement according to a modification of the Montreal classification. @*Results@#We identified 24 patients (21 males, 3 females) who underwent surgery for upper GI CD. The mean age at diagnosis was 27 ± 12 years, the mean age at surgery was 33 ± 11 years, and the mean duration of CD was 73.6 ± 56.6 months.Fifteen patients (62.5%) had history of previous perianal surgery. Ten patients (41.7%) had duodenal or gastric stricture and 14 patients (58.3%) had penetrating fistula; patients with fistula were significantly more likely to develop complications (57.1% vs. 20.0%, P = 0.035). One patient with stricture had surgical recurrence. In seven patients with fistula, fistula was related to previous anastomosis. Patients with fistula had significantly longer hospital stays than those with stricture (16 days vs. 11 days, P = 0.01). @*Conclusion@#Upper GI CD is rare among CD types (2.96%). In patients with upper GI CD, penetrating fistula was associated with longer hospital stay and more complications.

8.
Annals of Coloproctology ; : 382-389, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-896731

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Recurrence patterns in rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) are needed to evaluate for establishing tailored surveillance protocol. @*Methods@#This study included 2,215 patients with locally-advanced mid and low rectal cancer treated with radical resection between January 2005 and December 2012. Recurrence was evaluated according to receipt of PCRT; PCRT group (n = 1,258) and no-PCRT group (n = 957). Early recurrence occurred within 1 year of surgery and late recurrence after 3 years. The median follow-up duration was 65.7 ± 29 months. @*Results@#The overall recurrence rate was similar between the PCRT and no-PCRT group (25.8% vs. 24.9%, P = 0.622). The most common initial recurrence site was the lungs in both groups (50.6% vs. 49.6%, P = 0.864), followed by the liver, which was more common in the no-PCRT group (22.5% vs. 33.6%, P = 0.004). Most of the recurrence occurred within 3 years after surgery in both groups (85.3% vs. 85.8%, P = 0.862). Early recurrence was more common in the PCRT group than in the no-PCRT group (43.1% vs. 32.4%, P = 0.020). Recurrence within the first 6 months after surgery was significantly higher in the PCRT group than in the no-PCRT group (18.8% vs. 7.6%, P = 0.003). Lung (n = 27, 44.3%) and liver (n = 22, 36.1%) were the frequent the first relapsed site within 6 months after surgery in PCRT group. @*Conclusion@#Early recurrence within the first 1 year after surgery was more common in patients treated with PCRT. This difference would be considered for surveillance protocols and need to be evaluated in further studies.

9.
Annals of Coloproctology ; : 382-389, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-889027

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Recurrence patterns in rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) are needed to evaluate for establishing tailored surveillance protocol. @*Methods@#This study included 2,215 patients with locally-advanced mid and low rectal cancer treated with radical resection between January 2005 and December 2012. Recurrence was evaluated according to receipt of PCRT; PCRT group (n = 1,258) and no-PCRT group (n = 957). Early recurrence occurred within 1 year of surgery and late recurrence after 3 years. The median follow-up duration was 65.7 ± 29 months. @*Results@#The overall recurrence rate was similar between the PCRT and no-PCRT group (25.8% vs. 24.9%, P = 0.622). The most common initial recurrence site was the lungs in both groups (50.6% vs. 49.6%, P = 0.864), followed by the liver, which was more common in the no-PCRT group (22.5% vs. 33.6%, P = 0.004). Most of the recurrence occurred within 3 years after surgery in both groups (85.3% vs. 85.8%, P = 0.862). Early recurrence was more common in the PCRT group than in the no-PCRT group (43.1% vs. 32.4%, P = 0.020). Recurrence within the first 6 months after surgery was significantly higher in the PCRT group than in the no-PCRT group (18.8% vs. 7.6%, P = 0.003). Lung (n = 27, 44.3%) and liver (n = 22, 36.1%) were the frequent the first relapsed site within 6 months after surgery in PCRT group. @*Conclusion@#Early recurrence within the first 1 year after surgery was more common in patients treated with PCRT. This difference would be considered for surveillance protocols and need to be evaluated in further studies.

10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-740765

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Previous studies from Korea have described chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) patients with transition zone (TZ) in the colon. In this study, we evaluated the pathological characteristics and their association with long-term outcomes in Korean colonic pseudo-obstruction (CPO) patients with TZ. METHODS: We enrolled 39 CPO patients who were refractory to medical treatment and underwent colectomy between November 1989 and April 2016 (median age at symptoms onset: 45 [interquartile range, 29–57] years, males 46.2%). The TZ was defined as a colonic segment connecting a proximally dilated and distally non-dilated segment. Detailed pathologic analysis was performed. RESULTS: Among the 39 patients, 37 (94.9%) presented with TZ and 2 (5.1%) showed no definitive TZ. Median ganglion cell density in the TZ adjusted for the colonic circumference was significantly decreased compared to that in proximal dilated and distal non-dilated segments in TZ (+) patients (9.2 vs 254.3 and 150.5, P < 0.001). Among the TZ (+) patients, 6 showed additional pathologic findings including eosinophilic ganglionitis (n = 2), ulcers with combined cytomegalovirus infection (n = 2), diffuse ischemic changes (n = 1), and heterotropic myenteric plexus (n = 1). During follow-up (median, 61 months), 32 (82.1%) TZ (+) patients recovered without symptom recurrence after surgery. The presence of pathological features other than hypoganglionosis was an independent predictor of symptom recurrence after surgery (P = 0.046). CONCLUSIONS: Hypoganglionosis can be identified in the TZ of most Korean CPO patients. Detection of other pathological features in addition to TZ-associated hypoganglionosis was associated with poor post-operative outcomes.


Subject(s)
Cell Count , Colectomy , Colon , Colonic Pseudo-Obstruction , Cytomegalovirus Infections , Eosinophils , Follow-Up Studies , Ganglion Cysts , Humans , Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction , Korea , Male , Myenteric Plexus , Pathology , Recurrence , Ulcer
11.
Cancer Research and Treatment ; : 1135-1143, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-763166

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Extranodal extension (ENE) is closely associated with the aggressiveness of both colon and rectal cancer. This study evaluated the clinicopathologic significance and prognostic impact of ENE in separate populations of patients with colon and rectal cancers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The medical records of 2,346 patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) who underwent curative surgery at our institution between January 2003 and December 2011 were clinically and histologically reviewed. RESULTS: ENE was associated with younger age, advanced tumor stage, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), and perineural invasion (PNI) in both colon and rectal cancer. ENE rates differed significantly in patients with right colon (36.9%), left colon (42.6%), and rectal (48.7%) cancers (right vs. left, p=0.037; left vs. rectum, p=0.009). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate according to ENE status and primary tumor site differed significantly in patients with ENE-negative colon cancer (80.5%), ENE-negative rectal cancer (77.4%), ENE-positive colon cancer (68.6%), and ENE-positive rectal cancer (64.2%) (p<0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that advanced tumor stage, ENE, LVI, PNI, and absence of adjuvant chemotherapy were independently prognostic of reduced DFS in colon and rectal cancer patients. CONCLUSION: ENE is closely associated with the aggressiveness of colon and rectal cancers, with its frequency increasing from the right colon to the left colon to the rectum. ENE status is a significant independent predictor of DFS in CRC patients irrespective of tumor location. ENE might be more related with distally located CRC.


Subject(s)
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant , Colon , Colonic Neoplasms , Colorectal Neoplasms , Disease-Free Survival , Humans , Medical Records , Multivariate Analysis , Prognosis , Rectal Neoplasms , Rectum
12.
Annals of Coloproctology ; : 275-281, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762327

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We investigated the sensitivity of various evaluating modalities in predicting a pathologic complete response (pCR) after preoperative chemoradiation therapy (PCRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). METHODS: From a population of 2,247 LARC patients who underwent PCRT followed by surgery at Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea from January 2007 to June 2016, we retrospectively analyzed 313 patients (14.1%) who showed a pCR after surgery. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), abdominopelvic computed tomography (AP-CT), and endoscopy were performed within 2 weeks prior to surgery. RESULTS: Of the 313 patients analyzed, 256 (81.8%) had a pCR after radical surgery and 57 (18.2%) showed total regression after local excision. Preoperative TRUS, MRI, and AP-CT were performed in 283, 305, and 139 patients, respectively. Among these 3 groups, a prediction of a pCR of the primary tumor was made in 41 (14.5%), 51 (16.7%), and 27 patients (19.4%), respectively, before surgery. A prediction of a clinical N0 stage was made in 204 patients (88.3%) using TRUS, 130 (52.2%) using MRI, and 78 (65.5%) using AP-CT. Of the 211 patients who underwent endoscopy, 87 (41.2%) had a mention of clinical CR in their records. A prediction of a pathologic CR was made for 124 patients (39.6%) through at least one diagnostic modality. CONCLUSION: The various evaluation methods for predicting a pCR after PCRT show a predictive sensitivity of 0.15–0.41 for primary tumors and 0.52–0.88 for lymph nodes. Endoscopy is a relatively superior modality for predicting the pCR of the primary tumor of LARC patients.


Subject(s)
Endoscopy , Humans , Korea , Lymph Nodes , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Rectal Neoplasms , Retrospective Studies , Seoul , Ultrasonography
13.
Annals of Coloproctology ; : 194-201, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762317

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Transanal excision (TAE) is an alternative surgical procedure for early rectal cancer. This study compared long-term TAE outcomes, in terms of survival and local recurrence (LR), with total mesorectal excision (TME) in patients with pathologically confirmed T1 rectal cancer. METHODS: T1 rectal adenocarcinoma patients who underwent surgery from 1990 to 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients that were suspected to have preoperative lymph node metastasis were excluded. Demographics, recurrence, and survival were analyzed based on TAE and TME surgery. RESULTS: Of 268 individuals, 61 patients (26%) underwent TAE, which was characterized by proximity to the anus, submucosal invasion depth, and lesion infiltration, compared with TME patients (P < 0.001–0.033). During a median follow-up of 10.4 years, 12 patients had systemic and/or LR. Ten-year cancer-specific survival in the TAE and TME groups was not significantly different (98% vs. 100%). However, the 10-year LR rate in the TAE group was greater than that of TME group (10% vs. 0%, P < 0.001). Although 5 of the 6 TAE patients with LR underwent salvage surgery, one of the patients eventually died. The TAE surgical procedure (hazard ratio, 19.066; P = 0.007) was the only independent risk factor for LR. CONCLUSION: Although long-term survival after TAE was comparable to that after TME, TAE had a greater recurrence risk than TME. Thus, TAE should only be considered as an alternative surgical option for early rectal cancer in selected patients.


Subject(s)
Adenocarcinoma , Anal Canal , Colorectal Surgery , Demography , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Lymph Nodes , Neoplasm Metastasis , Rectal Neoplasms , Recurrence , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762302

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We evaluated the oncologic outcomes of organ-preserving strategies in patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT). METHODS: Between January 2008 and January 2013, 74 patients who underwent wait-and-watch (WW) (n = 42) and local excision (LE) (n = 32) were enrolled. Organ-preserving strategies were determined based on a combination of magnetic resonance imaging, sigmoidoscopy, and physical examination 4–6 weeks after completion of PCRT. The rectum sparing rate, 5-year recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS) were evaluated. RESULTS: The rectum was more frequently spared in the LE (100% vs. 87.5%, P = 0.018) at last follow-up. Recurrence occurred in 9 (28.1%) WW and 7 (16.7%) LE (P = 0.169). In the WW, 7 patients had only luminal regrowth and 2 had combined lung metastasis. In the LE, 2 (4.8%) had local recurrence only, 4 patients had distant metastasis, and 1 patient had local and distant metastasis. Among 13 patients who indicated salvage surgery (WW, n = 7; LE, n = 11), all in the WW received but all of LE refused salvage surgery (P = 0.048). The 5-year OS and 5-year RFS in overall patients was 92.7% and 76.9%, respectively, and were not different between WW and LE (P = 0.725, P = 0.129). CONCLUSION: WW and LE were comparable in terms of 5-year OS and RFS. In the LE group, salvage treatment was performed much less among indicated patients. Therefore, methods to improve the oncologic outcomes of patients indicated for salvage treatment should be considered before local excision.


Subject(s)
Chemoradiotherapy , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Lung , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Neoplasm Metastasis , Organ Preservation , Phenobarbital , Physical Examination , Rectal Neoplasms , Rectum , Recurrence , Salvage Therapy , Sigmoidoscopy , Treatment Outcome
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762294

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We evaluate the prognostic value of primary tumor location for oncologic outcomes in patients with colon cancer (CC). METHODS: CC patients treated with curative surgery between 2009 and 2012 were classified into 2 groups: right-sided colon cancer (RCC) and left-sided colon cancer (LCC). Recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were examined based on tumor stage. Propensity scores were created using eight variables (age, sex, T stage, N stage, histologic grade, presence of lymphovascular invasion/perineural invasion, and microsatellite instability status). RESULTS: Overall, 2,329 patients were identified. The 5-year RFSs for RCC and LCC patients were 89.7% and 88.4% (P = 0.328), respectively, and their 5-year OSs were 90.9% and 93.4% (P = 0.062). Multivariate survival analyses were carried out by using the Cox regression proportional hazard model. In the unadjusted analysis, a marginal increase in overall mortality was seen in RCC patients (hazard ratio [HR], 1.297; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.987–1.704, P = 0.062); however, after multivariable adjustment, similar OSs were observed in those patients (HR, 1.219; 95% CI, 0.91–1.633; P = 0.183). After propensity-score matching with a total of 1,560 patients, no significant difference was identified (P = 0.183). A slightly worse OS was seen for stage III RCC patients (HR, 1.561; 95% CI, 0.967–2.522; P = 0.068) than for stage III LCC patients. The 5-year OSs for patients with stage III RCC and stage III LCC were 85.5% and 90.5%, respectively (P = 0.133). CONCLUSION: Although the results are inconclusive, tumor location tended to be associated with OS in CC patients with lymph node metastasis, but it was not related to oncologic outcome.


Subject(s)
Colon , Colonic Neoplasms , Humans , Lymph Nodes , Microsatellite Instability , Mortality , Neoplasm Metastasis , Propensity Score , Proportional Hazards Models , Treatment Outcome
16.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762293

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Although the height of a rectal tumor above the anal verge (tumor height) partly determines the treatment strategy, no practical standard exists for reporting this. We aimed to demonstrate the differences in tumor height according to the diagnostic modality used for its measurement. METHODS: We identified 100 patients with rectal cancers located within 15 cm of the anal verge who had recorded tumor heights measured by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), colonoscopy, and digital rectal examination (DRE). Tumor height measured by using MRI was compared with those measured by using DRE and colonoscopy to assess reporting inconsistencies. Factors associated with differences in tumor height among the modalities were also evaluated. RESULTS: The mean tumor heights were 77.8 ± 3.3, 52.9 ± 2.3, and 68.9 ± 3.1 mm when measured by using MRI, DRE, and colonoscopy, respectively (P < 0.001). Agreement among the 3 modalities in terms of tumor sublocation within the rectum was found in only 39% of the patients. In the univariate and the multivariate analyses, clinical stage showed a possible association with concordance among modalities, but age, sex, and luminal location of the tumor were not associated with differences among modalities. CONCLUSION: The heights of rectal cancer differed according to the diagnostic modality. Tumor height has implications for rectal cancer’s surgical planning and for interpreting comparative studies. Hence, a consensus is needed for measuring and reporting tumor height.


Subject(s)
Colonoscopy , Consensus , Digital Rectal Examination , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Multivariate Analysis , Phenobarbital , Rectal Neoplasms , Rectum
17.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-715669

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The present study aimed to objectively evaluate robot-assisted abdominoperineal resection (APR) in comparison with open APR, in terms of operative elements and initial oncological outcomes. METHODS: A total of 118 patients with lower rectal adenocarcinoma who had undergone curative APR were consecutively enrolled between June 2010 and June 2016, i.e., robot-assisted group (n = 40) and open group (n = 78). RESULTS: Transabdominal extralevator muscle excision was more frequently performed in the robot-assisted group than in the open group (68% vs. 42%, P = 0.012). In the robot-assisted group, the pain score at one day after surgery was less than in the open group, and the resumption of bowel function was earlier (P = 0.043 and P = 0.002, respectively). The occurrence of circumferential resection margin involvement (CRM+) was more than 5 times greater in the open group than in the robot-assisted group, presenting a marginal significance (P = 0.057). Although important postoperative morbidity did not generally differ between the 2 groups, voiding difficulty and male sexual dysfunction appeared to be encountered more frequently in the open group than in the robot-assisted group. CONCLUSION: The robot-assisted APR facilitated transabdominal extralevator excision and bowel recovery and demonstrated a trend towards reduced CRM+.


Subject(s)
Adenocarcinoma , Humans , Male , Rectal Neoplasms , Robotics
18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-714532

ABSTRACT

The majority of malignant melanomas in the small intestine are metastases from primary cutaneous lesions, it can also develop as a primary mucosal tumor in the gastrointestinal tract. In this report, we present rare cases of primary small bowel melanoma and review the current literature. A 78-year-old male presented with abdominal pain and CT enterography identified a ileal mass. A 79-year-old female presented with signs and symptoms of partial small bowel obstruction. Abdominopelvic CT and small bowel series revealed a obstructing mass in the distal jejunum. The masses were confirmed on laparotomy and histologically diagnosed as melanoma. Extensive postoperative clinical examination revealed no cutaneous lesions. A primary small bowel melanoma is an extremely rare neoplasm. A definite diagnosis can only be made after a thorough investigation has been made to exclude the coexistence of a primary lesion. Curative resection of the tumor remains the treatment of choice.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Pain , Aged , Diagnosis , Female , Gastrointestinal Tract , Humans , Intestine, Small , Jejunum , Laparotomy , Male , Melanoma , Neoplasm Metastasis
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-713997

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Colostomy creation is an essential procedure for colorectal surgeons, but the preferred method of colostomy varies by surgeon. We compared the outcomes of trephine colostomy creation with open those for the (laparotomy) and laparoscopic methods and evaluated appropriate indications for a trephine colostomy and the advantages of the technique. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated 263 patients who had undergone colostomy creation by trephine, open and laparoscopic approaches between April 2006 and March 2016. We compared the clinical features and the operative and postoperative outcomes according to the approach used for stoma creation. RESULTS: One hundred sixty-three patients (62%) underwent colostomy surgery for obstructive causes and 100 (38%) for fistulous problems. The mean operative time was significantly shorter with the trephine approach (trephine, 46.0 ± 1.9 minutes; open, 78.7 ± 3.9 minutes; laparoscopic, 63.5 ± 5.0 minutes; P < 0.001), as was the time to flatus (1.8 ± 0.1 days, 2.1 ± 0.1 days, 2.2 ± 0.3 days, P = 0.025). Postoperative complications (<30 days) were not different among the 3 approaches (trephine, 4.3%; open, 1.2%; laparoscopic, 0%; P = 0.828). In patients who underwent rectal surgery, a trephine colostomy was feasible for a diversion colostomy (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The trephine colostomy is safe and can be implemented quickly in various situations, and compared to other colostomy procedures, the patient's recovery is faster. Previous laparotomy history was not a contraindication for a trephine colostomy, and a trephine transverse colostomy is feasible for patients who have undergone previous rectal surgery.


Subject(s)
Colostomy , Flatulence , Humans , Laparotomy , Methods , Operative Time , Postoperative Complications , Retrospective Studies , Surgeons
20.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-169999

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To investigate patterns of recurrence and oncologic outcomes after recurrence between preoperative and postoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). METHODS: Records of patients with stage II or III locally advanced rectal cancer seen between January 2000 and December 2010 were analyzed. The outcomes for patients undergoing preoperative CRT followed by radical resection (n = 466) were compared with outcomes of patients matched for sex, age, and stage who had surgery and then postoperative CRT (n = 466). Recurrence rates and sites, treatment of recurrence, and oncologic outcomes after recurrence were investigated. The rate of sphincter preservation and permanent stoma formation were also evaluated. RESULTS: Recurrence occurred in 124 and 140 patients in the pre- and postoperative CRT groups, respectively. The local and systemic recurrence rates were 3.6% and 20.8%, respectively, in the preoperative CRT group and 3.0% and 25.3%, respectively, in the postoperative CRT group (P = 0.245). Time to recurrence was longer in the postoperative CRT group (19 months vs. 24.2 months, P = 0.029). The overall rates of sphincter preservation (sphincter preservation operation and postoperative permanent stoma formation) did not significantly different between the two groups (P = 0.381). The 5-year overall survival rate after recurrence did not differ between the two groups (25.6% vs. 18.6%, P = 0.051). CONCLUSION: Preoperative and postoperative CRT are both safe and suitable treatment methods for rectal cancer, so the choice can be tailored to the patient's situation.


Subject(s)
Case-Control Studies , Chemoradiotherapy , Colorectal Surgery , Humans , Rectal Neoplasms , Recurrence , Survival Rate , Treatment Outcome
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