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1.
Annals of Pediatric Endocrinology & Metabolism ; : 126-133, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-937168

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#We investigated the possible effects of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) at the initial diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) on the clinical outcomes of pediatric patients. @*Methods@#Medical records of children and adolescents with newly diagnosed T1DM seen in the Ajou University Hospital from January 2008 to August 2020 were reviewed and analyzed. @*Results@#Among 129 diagnosed T1DM patients, 40.3% presented with DKA. Although demographic and basic characteristics did not differ between DKA and non-DKA patients, DKA patients needed a significantly higher insulin dosage than non-DKA patients for 2 years after diagnosis. However, control of glycated hemoglobin was not different between the DKA and non-DKA groups during the observation period. In the biochemical analysis, C-peptide, insulin-like growth factor-1, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, free T4, and T3 values were lower, but thyroid-stimulating hormone, initial serum glucose, uric acid, total cholesterol, triglyceride, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol values were higher in DKA patients than non-DKA patients at the diagnosis of T1DM; however, these differences were temporarily present and disappeared with insulin treatment. Other clinical outcomes, such as height, thyroid function, and urine microalbumin level, did not vary significantly between the DKA and non-DKA groups during 5 years of follow-up. @*Conclusion@#DKA at initial presentation reflects the severity of disease progression, and the deleterious effects of DKA seem to impact insulin secretion. Although no difference in long-term prognosis was found, early detection of T1DM should help to reduce DKA-related islet damage and the socioeconomic burden of T1DM.

2.
Annals of Pediatric Endocrinology & Metabolism ; : 31-37, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-896888

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Because small for gestational age (SGA) children who fail to experience catch-up growth have an increased risk of short stature in adulthood, growth hormone (GH) treatment is recommended for effective growth. In this study, we evaluated the effect of GH treatment during the prepubertal period and analyzed for correlation between GH treatment response and clinical factors in SGA children. @*Methods@#A retrospective, single-center study was conducted from 2014 to 2020. A total of 34 prepubertal children of short stature up to 4 years of age and born as SGA were enrolled. We recorded clinical data including birth data, age, weight, height, bone age (BA), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels. @*Results@#The mean gestational age and birth weight were 37.50±2.51 weeks and 2,200.00±546.79 g. At the start of GH treatment, the mean chronological age and BA were 5.54±1.73 years and 4.52±1.85 years, respectively. The height standard deviation score (SDS) (-2.47±0.45) and IGF-1 SDS (0.16±1.57) were calculated. Height velocity was 9.43±1.40 cm during the first GH treatment year and 7.63±1.16 cm during the second year (P<0.05). The treatment growth response was positively correlated with young age (P=0.047) and lower BA (P=0.049) at the start of treatment. In multiple regression analysis, IGF-1 SDS change had a significantly positive association with GH treatment response (P=0.045). @*Conclusion@#GH treatment is effective for short stature SGA children who do not experience catch-up growth. Early initiation of GH treatment improved growth outcomes. As IGF-1 SDS is positively correlated with height SDS, IGF-1 monitoring is important during GH treatment of SGA prepubertal children.

3.
Annals of Pediatric Endocrinology & Metabolism ; : 31-37, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-889184

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Because small for gestational age (SGA) children who fail to experience catch-up growth have an increased risk of short stature in adulthood, growth hormone (GH) treatment is recommended for effective growth. In this study, we evaluated the effect of GH treatment during the prepubertal period and analyzed for correlation between GH treatment response and clinical factors in SGA children. @*Methods@#A retrospective, single-center study was conducted from 2014 to 2020. A total of 34 prepubertal children of short stature up to 4 years of age and born as SGA were enrolled. We recorded clinical data including birth data, age, weight, height, bone age (BA), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels. @*Results@#The mean gestational age and birth weight were 37.50±2.51 weeks and 2,200.00±546.79 g. At the start of GH treatment, the mean chronological age and BA were 5.54±1.73 years and 4.52±1.85 years, respectively. The height standard deviation score (SDS) (-2.47±0.45) and IGF-1 SDS (0.16±1.57) were calculated. Height velocity was 9.43±1.40 cm during the first GH treatment year and 7.63±1.16 cm during the second year (P<0.05). The treatment growth response was positively correlated with young age (P=0.047) and lower BA (P=0.049) at the start of treatment. In multiple regression analysis, IGF-1 SDS change had a significantly positive association with GH treatment response (P=0.045). @*Conclusion@#GH treatment is effective for short stature SGA children who do not experience catch-up growth. Early initiation of GH treatment improved growth outcomes. As IGF-1 SDS is positively correlated with height SDS, IGF-1 monitoring is important during GH treatment of SGA prepubertal children.

4.
Neonatal Medicine ; : 41-47, 2019.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-741665

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: 17-Hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) screening results are difficult to interpret owing to the many influencing factors, and confirming the test results takes time. In this study, we examined the factors that affected the 17-OHP level in premature infants. We also evaluated the correlation between 17-OHP level and the clinical parameters related to adrenal cortical function. METHODS: From January 2012 to April 2017, 358 very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBWI) born with birth weights of < 1,500 g were included in the study. Their 17-OHP levels were measured in the neonatal screening test after birth and analyzed by considering various factors that may have influenced the values. RESULTS: The 17-OHP levels negatively correlated with gestational age and birth weight. The values of the parameters that affected the 17-OHP levels were significantly higher in the infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). In relation to the clinical parameters, blood pressure measured within 24 hours, 72 hours, and 1 week after birth negatively correlated with the 17-OHP level. Serum sodium and 17-OHP levels 24 hours after birth were found to be positively correlated. Urine outputs in 1 and 3 days after birth showed significant positive correlations with the 17-OHP level. CONCLUSION: The 17-OHP levels of the VLBWIs were higher when gestational age and birth weight were lower, and were influenced by RDS in the VLBWI. In addition, hypotension and urine output values may be useful in the neonatal intensive care unit as a predictor of early adrenal insufficiency.


Subject(s)
Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , 17-alpha-Hydroxyprogesterone , Adrenal Hyperplasia, Congenital , Adrenal Insufficiency , Birth Weight , Blood Pressure , Gestational Age , Hypotension , Infant, Premature , Infant, Very Low Birth Weight , Intensive Care, Neonatal , Mass Screening , Neonatal Screening , Parturition , Sodium
5.
Yeungnam University Journal of Medicine ; : 148-151, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-939344

ABSTRACT

The dose of CD34+ cells is known to influence the outcome of allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) and/or T-cell-depleted transplantation. A previous study proposed that 2×10⁶ CD34+ cells/kg is the ideal minimum dose for allogeneic transplantation, although lower doses did not preclude successful therapy. In the case we present here, CD34+ cells were collected from a matched sibling donor on the day of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; however, the number of cells was not sufficient for transplantation. Consequently, PBSCs were collected three additional times and were infused along with cord blood cells from the donor that were cryopreserved at birth. The cumulative dose of total nuclear cells and CD34+ cells was 15.9×10⁸ cells/kg and 0.95×10⁶ cells/kg, respectively. White blood cells from this patient were engrafted on day 12. In summary, we report successful engraftment after infusion of multiple low doses of CD34+ cells in a patient with severe aplastic anemia.

6.
Yeungnam University Journal of Medicine ; : 148-151, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-785307

ABSTRACT

The dose of CD34+ cells is known to influence the outcome of allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) and/or T-cell-depleted transplantation. A previous study proposed that 2×10⁶ CD34+ cells/kg is the ideal minimum dose for allogeneic transplantation, although lower doses did not preclude successful therapy. In the case we present here, CD34+ cells were collected from a matched sibling donor on the day of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; however, the number of cells was not sufficient for transplantation. Consequently, PBSCs were collected three additional times and were infused along with cord blood cells from the donor that were cryopreserved at birth. The cumulative dose of total nuclear cells and CD34+ cells was 15.9×10⁸ cells/kg and 0.95×10⁶ cells/kg, respectively. White blood cells from this patient were engrafted on day 12. In summary, we report successful engraftment after infusion of multiple low doses of CD34+ cells in a patient with severe aplastic anemia.


Subject(s)
Humans , Anemia, Aplastic , Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation , Fetal Blood , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Leukocytes , Parturition , Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation , Siblings , Stem Cells , Tissue Donors , Transplantation, Homologous
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