Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 7 de 7
Filter
Add filters








Language
Year range
1.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-832044

ABSTRACT

Objective@#The aim of this study was to investigate differentially expressed genes and their functions in the hippocampus and striatum after heroin administration in cynomolgus macaques of different ages. @*Methods@#Cynomolgus monkeys were divided by age as follows: 1 year (A1, n = 2); 3 to 4 years (A2, n = 2); 6 to 8 years (A3, n = 2); and older than 11 years (A4, n = 2). After heroin was injected intramuscularly into the monkeys (0.6 mg/kg), we performed large-scale transcriptome profiling in the hippocampus (H) and striatum (S) using RNA sequencing technology. Some genes were validated with real-time quantitative PCR. @*Results@#In the hippocampus, the gene expression of A1H was similar to that of A4H, while the gene expression of A2H was similar to that of A3H. Genes associated with the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway (STMN1, FGF14, and MAPT) and -aminobutyric acid-ergic synapses (GABBR2 and GAD1) were differentially expressed among control and heroin-treated animals. Differential gene expression between A1S and A4S was the least significant, while differential gene expression between A3S and A2S was the most significant. Genes associated with the neurotrophin signaling pathway (NTRK1 and NGFR), autophagy (ATG5), and dopaminergic synapses (AKT1) in the striatum were differentially expressed among control and heroin-treated animals. @*Conclusion@#These results suggest that even a single heroin exposure can cause differential gene expression in the hippocampus and striatum of nonhuman primates at different ages.

2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-117336

ABSTRACT

B-cell lymphoma (BCL)-2-interacting cell death suppressor (BIS) has diverse cellular functions depending on its binding partners. However, little is known about the effects of biochemical modification of BIS on its various activities under oxidative stress conditions. In this study, we showed that H₂O₂ reduced BIS mobility on SDS–polyacrylamide gels in a time-dependent manner via the activation of extracellular signaling-regulated kinase (ERK). The combined results of mass spectroscopy and computational prediction identified Thr285 and Ser289 in BIS as candidate residues for phosphorylation by ERK under oxidative stress conditions. Deletion of these sites resulted in a partial reduction in the H₂O₂-induced mobility shift relative to that of the wild-type BIS protein; overexpression of the deletion mutant sensitized A172 cells to H₂O₂-induced cell death without increasing the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Expression of the BIS deletion mutant decreased the level of heat shock protein (HSP) 70 mRNA following H₂O₂ treatment, which was accompanied by impaired nuclear translocation of heat shock transcription factor (HSF) 1. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the binding of wild-type BIS to HSF1 was decreased by oxidative stress, while the binding of the BIS deletion mutant to HSF1 was not affected. These results indicate that ERK-dependent phosphorylation of BIS has a role in the regulation of nuclear translocation of HSF1 likely through modulation of its interaction affinity with HSF1, which affects HSP70 expression and sensitivity to oxidative stress.


Subject(s)
Cell Death , Gels , Heat-Shock Proteins , Hot Temperature , Immunoprecipitation , Lymphoma, B-Cell , Mass Spectrometry , Oxidative Stress , Phosphorylation , Phosphotransferases , Reactive Oxygen Species , RNA, Messenger , Shock , Transcription Factors
3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-727707

ABSTRACT

The Bis protein is known to be involved in a variety of cellular processes including apoptosis, migration, autophagy as well as protein quality control. Bis expression is induced in response to a number of types of stress, such as heat shock or a proteasome inhibitor via the activation of heat shock factor (HSF)1. We report herein that Bis expression is increased at the transcriptional level in HK-2 kidney tubular cells and A172 glioma cells by exposure to oxidative stress such as H2O2 treatment and oxygen-glucose deprivation, respectively. The pretreatment of HK-2 cells with N-acetyl cysteine, suppressed Bis induction. Furthermore, HSF1 silencing attenuated Bis expression that was induced by H2O2, accompaniedby increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Using a series of deletion constructs of the bis gene promoter, two putative heat shock elements located in the proximal region of the bis gene promoter were found to be essential for the constitutive expression is as well as the inducible expression of Bis. Taken together, our results indicate that oxidative stress induces Bis expression at the transcriptional levels via activation of HSF1, which might confer an expansion of antioxidant capacity against pro-oxidant milieu. However, the possible role of the other cis-element in the induction of Bis remains to be determined.


Subject(s)
Apoptosis , Autophagy , Cysteine , Glioma , Hot Temperature , Kidney , Oxidative Stress , Proteasome Inhibitors , Quality Control , Reactive Oxygen Species , Shock
4.
Genomics & Informatics ; : 245-253, 2013.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-11248

ABSTRACT

A radioresistant cell line was established by fractionated ionizing radiation (IR) and assessed by a clonogenic assay, flow cytometry, and Western blot analysis, as well as zymography and a wound healing assay. Microarray was performed to profile global expression and to search for differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in response to IR. H460R cells demonstrated increased cell scattering and acidic vesicular organelles compared with parental cells. Concomitantly, H460R cells showed characteristics of increased migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. In addition, H460R cells were resistant to IR, exhibiting reduced expression levels of ionizing responsive proteins (p-p53 and gamma-H2AX); apoptosis-related molecules, such as cleaved poly(ADP ribose) polymerase; and endoplasmic reticulum stress-related molecules, such as glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and C/EBP-homologous protein compared with parental cells, whereas the expression of anti-apoptotic X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein was increased. Among DEGs, syntrophin beta 2 (SNTB2) significantly increased in H460R cells in response to IR. Knockdown of SNTB2 by siRNA was more sensitive than the control after IR exposure in H460, H460R, and H1299 cells. Our study suggests that H460R cells have differential properties, including cell morphology, potential for metastasis, and resistance to IR, compared with parental cells. In addition, SNTB2 may play an important role in radioresistance. H460R cells could be helpful in in vitro systems for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of and discovering drugs to overcome radioresistance in lung cancer therapy.


Subject(s)
Apoptosis , Blotting, Western , Cell Line , Endoplasmic Reticulum , Flow Cytometry , Humans , Lung Neoplasms , Lung , Matrix Metalloproteinases , Neoplasm Metastasis , Organelles , Parents , Radiation, Ionizing , RNA, Small Interfering , Wound Healing , X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein
5.
Genomics & Informatics ; : 28-33, 2010.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-190602

ABSTRACT

Increased exposure of human to RF fields has raised concerns for its potential adverse effects on our health. To address the biological effects of RF radiation, we used genome wide gene expression as the indicator. We exposed normal WI-38 human fibroblast cells to 1763 MHz mobile phone RF radiation at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 60 W/kg with an operating cooling system for 24 h. There were no alterations in cell numbers or morphology after RF exposure. Through microarray analysis, we identified no differentially expressed genes (DEGs) at the 0.05 significance level after controlling for multiple testing errors with the Benjaminiochberg false discovery rate (BH FDR) method. Meanwhile, 82 genes were differentially expressed between RF-exposed cells and controls when the significance level was set at 0.01 without correction for multiple comparisons. We found that 24 genes (0.08% of the total genes examined) were changed by more than 1.5-fold on RF exposure. However, significant enrichment of any gene set or pathway was not observed from the functional annotation analysis. From these results, we did not find any evidence that non-thermal RF radiation at a 60-W/kg SAR significantly affects cell proliferation or gene expression in WI-38 cells.


Subject(s)
Absorption , Cell Count , Cell Proliferation , Cell Phone , Fibroblasts , Gene Expression , Genome , Humans , Microarray Analysis
6.
Genomics & Informatics ; : 34-40, 2010.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-190601

ABSTRACT

Radiofrequency (RF) radiation might induce the transcription of a certain set of genes as other physical stresses like ionizing radiation and UV. To observe transcriptional changes upon RF radiation, we exposed WI-38, human lung fibroblast cell to 1763 MHz of mobile phone RF radiation at 60 W/kg of specific absorption rate (SAR) for 24h with or without heat control. There were no significant changes in cell numbers and morphology after exposure to RF radiation. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we checked the expression of three heat shock protein (HSP) (HSPA1A, HSPA6 and HSP105) and seven stress-related genes (TNFRSF11B, FGF2, TGFB2, ITGA2, BRIP1, EXO1, and MCM10) in RF only and RF/HS groups of RF-exposed cells. The expressions of three heat shock proteins and seven stress-related genes were selectively changed only in RF/HS groups. Based on the expression of ten genes, we could classify thermal and non-thermal effect of RF-exposure, which genes can be used as biomarkers for RF radiation exposure.


Subject(s)
Absorption , Cell Count , Cell Phone , Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 , Fibroblasts , Gene Expression , Heat-Shock Proteins , Hot Temperature , Humans , Lung , Radiation, Ionizing , Transcriptome , Biomarkers
7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-69447

ABSTRACT

Angiotensin II (Ang II), which is an important mediator of both vascular responsiveness and growth, has been shown to induce vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) hypertrophy via the activation of a complex series of intracellular signaling events. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) has recently been shown to protect against Ang II-induced hypertension. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that Hsp70 can protect VSMC from Ang II-induced hypertrophy. We treated VSMCs with Ang II to induce hypertrophy and to activate MAPK signaling pathway. We observed that the augmentation of Hsp70 expression inhibited Ang II-stimulated VSMC hypertrophy. This inhibitory effect of Hsp70 appears to be partly due to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) inactivation, which in turn, may possibly result from the accumulation of MAP kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1).


Subject(s)
Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Rats , RNA, Small Interfering/pharmacology , Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases/metabolism , Phosphoprotein Phosphatases/metabolism , Muscle, Smooth, Vascular/cytology , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3/antagonists & inhibitors , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1/antagonists & inhibitors , Male , MAP Kinase Kinase 2/metabolism , MAP Kinase Kinase 1/metabolism , Immediate-Early Proteins/metabolism , Hypertrophy , HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Flavonoids/pharmacology , Enzyme Stability/drug effects , Cells, Cultured , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Aorta/drug effects , Animals , Angiotensin II/pharmacology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL