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1.
Chinese Journal of Stomatology ; (12): 498-505, 2023.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-986102

ABSTRACT

Periodontitis is one of the most common infectious oral diseases, which can cause destruction of periodontal supporting tissues and even tooth mobility and loss. Controlling infection, eliminating inflammation, restoring the physiological shape of periodontal tissues, and meeting functional and aesthetic needs are the main goals of periodontal treatment. When periodontitis develops to a more severe stage, surgical treatment is necessary to handle soft and hard tissues for good treatment results. Since the development of the first Nd:YAG laser dedicated to dental medicine by Myers in 1990, over 30 years of clinical and basic research have shown that lasers have tremendous potential in assisting periodontal surgery. This article summarizes the principles and operational routines of laser-assisted periodontal surgery, aiming to provide clinical reference for diagnosis and treatment.

2.
China Journal of Chinese Materia Medica ; (24): 4902-4907, 2023.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-1008660

ABSTRACT

Malaria, one of the major global public health events, is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity among children and adults in tropical and subtropical regions(mainly in sub-Saharan Africa), threatening human health. It is well known that malaria can cause various complications including anemia, blackwater fever, cerebral malaria, and kidney damage. Conventionally, cardiac involvement has not been listed as a common reason affecting morbidity and mortality of malaria, which may be related to ignored cases or insufficient diagnosis. However, the serious clinical consequences such as acute coronary syndrome, heart failure, and malignant arrhythmia caused by malaria have aroused great concern. At present, antimalarials are commonly used for treating malaria in clinical practice. However, inappropriate medication can increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases and cause severe consequences. This review summarized the research advances in the cardiovascular complications including acute myocardial infarction, arrhythmia, hypertension, heart failure, and myocarditis in malaria. The possible mechanisms of cardiovascular diseases caused by malaria were systematically expounded from the hypotheses of cell adhesion, inflammation and cytokines, myocardial apoptosis induced by plasmodium toxin, cardiac injury secondary to acute renal failure, and thrombosis. Furthermore, the effects of quinolines, nucleoprotein synthesis inhibitors, and artemisinin and its derivatives on cardiac structure and function were summarized. Compared with the cardiac toxicity of quinolines in antimalarial therapy, the adverse effects of artemisinin-derived drugs on heart have not been reported in clinical studies. More importantly, the artemisinin-derived drugs demonstrate favorable application prospects in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, and are expected to play a role in the treatment of malaria patients with cardiovascular diseases. This review provides reference for the prevention and treatment of malaria-related cardiovascular complications as well as the safe application of antimalarials.


Subject(s)
Child , Adult , Humans , Antimalarials/pharmacology , Cardiovascular Diseases/drug therapy , Artemisinins/pharmacology , Quinolines , Malaria, Cerebral/drug therapy , Heart Failure/drug therapy , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/drug therapy
3.
Chinese Medical Journal ; (24): 1335-1344, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-878176

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND@#Fecal immunochemical tests (FITs) are the most widely used non-invasive tests in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. However, evidence about the direct comparison of the test performance of the self-administered qualitative a laboratory-based quantitative FITs in a CRC screening setting is sparse.@*METHODS@#Based on a CRC screening trial (TARGET-C), we included 3144 pre-colonoscopy fecal samples, including 24 CRCs, 230 advanced adenomas, 622 non-advanced adenomas, and 2268 participants without significant findings at colonoscopy. Three self-administered qualitative FITs (Pupu tube) with positivity thresholds of 8.0, 14.4, or 20.8 μg hemoglobin (Hb)/g preset by the manufacturer and one laboratory-based quantitative FIT (OC-Sensor) with a positivity threshold of 20 μg Hb/g recommended by the manufacturer were tested by trained staff in the central laboratory. The diagnostic performance of the FITs for detecting colorectal neoplasms was compared in the different scenarios using the preset and adjusted thresholds (for the quantitative FIT).@*RESULTS@#At the thresholds preset by the manufacturers, apart from the qualitative FIT-3, significantly higher sensitivities for detecting advanced adenoma were observed for the qualitative FIT-1 (33.9% [95% CI: 28.7-39.4%]) and qualitative FIT-2 (22.2% [95% CI: 17.7-27.2%]) compared to the quantitative FIT (11.7% [95% CI: 8.4-15.8%]), while at a cost of significantly lower specificities. However, such difference was not observed for detecting CRC. For scenarios of adjusting the positivity thresholds of the quantitative FIT to yield comparable specificity or comparable positivity rate to the three qualitative FITs accordingly, there were no significant differences in terms of sensitivity, specificity, positive/negative predictive values and positive/negative likelihood ratios for detecting CRC or advanced adenoma between the two types of FITs, which was further evidenced in ROC analysis.@*CONCLUSIONS@#Although the self-administered qualitative and the laboratory-based quantitative FITs had varied test performance at the positivity thresholds preset by the manufacturer, such heterogeneity could be overcome by adjusting thresholds to yield comparable specificities or positivity rates. Future CRC screening programs should select appropriate types of FITs and define the thresholds based on the targeted specificities and manageable positivity rates.


Subject(s)
Humans , Colonoscopy , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Early Detection of Cancer , Feces , Hemoglobins/analysis , Laboratories , Occult Blood , Sensitivity and Specificity
4.
Chinese Journal of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery ; (12): 133-138, 2020.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-787613

ABSTRACT

To research the auditory nerve transduction effects under multi-wavelength pulsed laser stimulations within a safe and acceptable signal range. The real-time detection of intracellular calcium concentration was adopted by specific fluorescent indicator staining based on calcium imager. The spiral ganglion cells of mice were cultured in vitro. After fluorescent indicating, morphologic observation under optical microscope, Fura-2 calcium ion fluorescence excitation, intact morphology cells selection, fixing the optical fiber, the spiral ganglion cells were irradiated by different wavelength laser, including visible light (450 nm) and near infrared light (808 nm,1 065 nm). The intracellular calcium concentration was monitored by calcium ion imaging. When 450 nm laser stimulated spiral ganglion cells, the intracellular calcium concentration was strongly increased, however, for other wavelength laser stimulation, there was no obvious relative response. And the sensitivity expression of the nerve cells under laser was related with the location of laser fiber. Cells closer to the fiber produced more obvious changes in calcium ion concentration, while for cells farther away from the fiber, the change amplitudes were weaker although the number of changes in calcium ion concentration was consistent. The spiral ganglion cells of mice can induce a signal transduction response under the action of laser, and the response has laser wavelength selectivity.

5.
West China Journal of Stomatology ; (6): 422-427, 2019.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-772634

ABSTRACT

Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of periodontal tissues initiated by oral biofilm. Cellular autophagy is an effective weapon against bacterial infection. Recent studies have shown that autophagy not only promotes the removal of bacteria and toxins from infected cells, but also helps to suppress the inflammatory response to maintain the homeostasis of intracellular environment, which is closely related to the development of periodontitis. Here, we reviewed the relationship between autophagy and periodontitis from three aspects: the interactions between autophagy and periodontal pathogen infection, the regulation of autophagy and immune inflammatory responses, and the relationship between autophagy and alveolar bone metabolism. We aim to provide ideas for further study on the mechanisms of autophagy and periodontitis, and ultimately contribute to a better prevention and treatment of periodontitis.


Subject(s)
Humans , Autophagy , Bacteria , Biofilms , Periodontitis , Periodontium
6.
Basic & Clinical Medicine ; (12): 698-702, 2018.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-693967

ABSTRACT

Pulmonary fibrosis(PF)is characterized by extensive deposition of extracellular matrix(ECM),changes in biomechanical properties of ECM result from the process of PF actively drive disease progression.Several matrix protein candidates correlate with fibrotic pathologies,ECM may offer many novel therapeutic targets.

7.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 133-137, 2016.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-304738

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To culture rat prostate glandular epithelial cells and study their barrier functions in vitro.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Rat prostate glandular epithelial cells were cultured in vitro. The expression of the tight junction protein claudin-1 was determined by immunohistochemistry, the structure and composition of the epithelial cells observed under the inverted microscope and transmission electron microscope. The transepithelial electrical resistances (TEERs) were monitored with the Millicell system. The permeability of the prostate glandular epithelial cells was assessed by the phenol red leakage test.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Compact monolayer cell structures were formed in the prostate glandular epithelial cells cultured in vitro. Immunohistochemistry showed the expression of the tight junction protein claudin-1 and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the formation of tight junctions between the adjacent glandular epithelial cells. The TEERs in the cultured prostate glandular epithelial cells reached the peak of about (201.3 ± 3.5) Ω/cm2 on the 8th day. The phenol red leakage test manifested a decreased permeability of the cell layers with the increase of TEERs.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>The structure and function of rat prostate glandular epithelial cells are similar to those of brain capillary endothelial cells, retinal capillary endothelial cells, and intestinal epithelial cells. In vitro cultured prostate glandular epithelial cells have the barrier function and can be used as a model for the study of blood prostate barrier in vitro.</p>


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Rats , Cell Membrane Permeability , Cells, Cultured , Claudin-1 , Metabolism , Electric Impedance , Epithelial Cells , Pathology , Physiology , In Vitro Techniques , Microscopy, Electron, Transmission , Phenolsulfonphthalein , Pharmacokinetics , Prostate , Metabolism , Pathology , Tight Junctions
8.
National Journal of Andrology ; (12): 294-299, 2015.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-319505

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To investigate the inhibitory effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on E coliinduced prostatitis in rats.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>BMSCs were isolated, cultured and amplified by the attached choice method. Fifty SD rats were randomized into five groups of equal number: normal control, acute bacterial prostatitis (ABP) , chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP), ABP + BMSCs, and CBP + BMSCs, and the animals in the latter four groups were injected with E. coli into both sides of the prostate under ultrasound guidance for 1 - 14 days to induce ABP and for 4 - 12 weeks to induce CBP. The control rats were injected with the same amount of PBS. Two weeks after injection of BMSCs into the prostates, pathomorphological changes in the prostate were observed under the light microscope and the mRNA and protein levels of IL-1β and TNF-α determined by RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively, followed by statistical analysis with SPSS 18.0.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Histopathological evaluation showed typical pathological inflammatory changes in the prostates of the rats in the ABP and CBP groups, including glandular structural changes, interstitial edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and fibrous hyperplasia, which were all remarkably relieved after treated with BMSCs. The mRNA and protein levels of IL-β ([0.829 ± 0.121] and [271.75 ± 90.59] pg/ml) and TNF-α ([0.913 ± 0. 094] and [105.78 ± 19. 05] pg/ml) in the ABP and those of IL-1β ([0. 975 ± 0. 114] and [265. 31 ± 71. 34] pg/ml) and TNF-α ([0. 886 ± 0. 084] and [107. 45 ± 26. 11 ] pg/ml) in the CBP groups were significantly higher than those in the control rats ([0. 342 ± 0.087] and [45.76 17. 99] pg/ml, P <0. 05); ([0.247 ± 0.054] and ([19.42 ± 7. 75] pg/ml, P <0. 01) as well as than those in the ABP + BMSCs ([0. 433 ± 0. 072] and [51. 34 ± 22. 13] pg/ml, P < 0. 05 ) ; ( [0. 313 ± 0. 076] and [28. 38 ± 8. 78] pg/ml, P < 0. 01) and the CBP + BMSCs group ([0.396 ± 0.064] and [56.37 ± 21.22] pg/ml, P <0.05); ([0.417 ± 0.068] and [29.21 ± 10.22] pg/ml, P <0.01).</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>Injection of BMSCs can reduce E coli-induced prostatic inflammation reaction, which.may be associated with its reduction of inflammatory cell infiltration and the expressions of IL-1β and TNF-α in the prostate tissue.</p>


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Male , Rats , Acute Disease , Bone Marrow Cells , Physiology , Chronic Disease , Escherichia coli Infections , Therapeutics , Interleukin-1beta , Genetics , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , Physiology , Prostate , Metabolism , Prostatitis , Metabolism , Microbiology , Therapeutics , RNA, Messenger , Random Allocation , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha , Genetics , Metabolism
9.
Chinese Medical Journal ; (24): 433-437, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-357984

ABSTRACT

<p><b>BACKGROUND</b>Decreases in the bioavailability of rifampicin (RFP) can lead to the development of drug resistance and treatment failure. Therefore, we investigated the relative bioavailability of RFP from one four-drug fixed-dose combination (FDC; formulation A) and three two-drug FDCs (formulations B, C, and D) used in China, compared with RFP in free combinations of these drugs (reference), in healthy volunteers.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Eighteen and twenty healthy Chinese male volunteers participated in two open-label, randomized two-period crossover (formulations A and C) or one three-period crossover (formulations B and D) study, respectively. The washout period between treatments was 7 days. Bioequivalence was assessed based on 90% confidence intervals, according to two one-sided t-tests. All analyses were done with DAS 3.1.5 (Mathematical Pharmacology Professional Committee of China, Shanghai, China).</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>Mean pharmacokinetic parameter values of RFP obtained for formulations A, B, C, and D products were 11.42 ± 3.41 μg/ml, 7.86 ± 5.78 μg/ml, 13.05 ± 6.80 μg/ml, and 16.18 ± 3.87 μg/ml, respectively, for peak plasma concentration (C max ), 91.43 ± 30.82 μg·h-1·ml-1 , 55.49 ± 37.58 μg·h-1·ml-1 , 96.50 ± 47.24 μg·h-1·ml-1 , 101.47 ± 33.07 μg·h-1·ml-1 , respectively, for area under the concentration-time curve (AUC 0-24 h ).</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>Although the concentrations of RFP for formulations A, C, and D were within the reported acceptable therapeutic range, only formulation A was bioequivalent to the reference product. The three two-drug FDCs (formulations B, C and D) displayed inferior RFP bioavailability compared with the reference (Chinese Clinical Trials registration number: ChiCTR-TTRCC-12002451).</p>


Subject(s)
Adult , Humans , Male , Young Adult , Asian People , Biological Availability , Drug Combinations , Rifampin , Pharmacokinetics , Therapeutic Uses , Tuberculosis , Drug Therapy
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