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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-785934

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Several studies have reported that periprocedural dual antiplatelet therapy lowers the incidence of thromboembolic complications (TEC) associated with coiling of unruptured aneurysms. We hypothesized that preprocedural administration of dual antiplatelet agents (aspirin and cilostazol) for 7days may reduce the risk of complications associated with diagnostic cerebral digital subtraction angiography (DSA).METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients who underwent diagnostic cerebral DSA between September 2015 and April 2018. Of the 419 patients included (149 men, 270 women, mean age 58.5 years), 221 (72 men, 149 women, mean age 57.8 years) who underwent cerebral DSA between September 2015 and June 2016 were not premedicated with antiplatelet therapy. The remaining 198 (77 men, 121 women, mean age 59.4 years) who underwent cerebral DSA between July 2016 and April 2018 were premedicated with dual antiplatelet therapy (aspirin and cilostazol). We defined ischemic stroke as a cerebral DSA-induced complication identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) among patients with neurological symptoms.RESULTS: Of the 221 patients who did not receive antiplatelet therapy, 210 (95.0%) showed no neurological symptoms; however, 11 (5.0%) developed neurological symptoms with MRI-proven ischemic stroke, which represents a TEC. Of the 198 patients who received dual antiplatelet therapy, 196 patients (99.0%) showed no evidence of TEC. The remaining 2 (1.0%) developed diplopia and motor weakness each, and MRI confirmed acute ischemic stroke (p=0.019).CONCLUSIONS: The use of dual antiplatelet agents (aspirin and cilostazol) for 7 days before DSA may reduce the risk of cerebral DSA-induced TEC.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Angiography, Digital Subtraction , Diplopia , Female , Humans , Incidence , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors , Premedication , Retrospective Studies , Stroke , Thromboembolism
2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-713253

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this retrospective study is to determine the accuracy of maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of computed tomographic angiography (CTA) for diagnosis of cerebral vasospasm (CV) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) compared with that of digital subtraction angiography (DSA). MATERIALS AND METHODS: For patients admitted to our hospital for SAH, MIP images of CTA and DSA were checked at admission, and images were taken again 1 week later. This protocol was used in 39 cases. MIP images of CTA and DSA examinations were reviewed by two independent readers. RESULTS: Accuracy of MIP images of CTA in various arterial segments, using DSA as the gold standard: the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy for different segments varied from 84 to 97, 33–100, 84–100%, 25–85, and 79–97%, respectively, for readers. Accuracy of CTA in various vasospasm severity, using DSA as the gold standard: the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy for different vasospasm severity varied from 44 to 100, 69–100, 36–100%, 61–100, and 88–100%, respectively, for readers. Accuracy of CTA in central segments versus peripheral segments, using DSA as the gold standard: the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy for central segments and peripheral segments varied from 90 to 94, 68–83, 93–97%, 56–69, and 87–93%, respectively, for readers. CONCLUSION: MIP imaging of CTA is a useful modality when diagnosing CV after SAH.


Subject(s)
Angiography , Angiography, Digital Subtraction , Diagnosis , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Sensitivity and Specificity , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage , Vasospasm, Intracranial
3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-713251

ABSTRACT

An intracranial pseudoaneurysm (PA) is a very rare disease and is known to occur in less than 1% of intracranial aneurysms. The pathophysiology and the modality of the proper treatment of PA have not yet been clearly established. We report a case of PA associated with ruptured cerebral aneurysms which was successfully treated by coil embolization, and also discuss the possible hypothesis on the formation of the PA and feasibility of endovascular treatments.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Aneurysm, False , Angiography , Embolization, Therapeutic , Intracranial Aneurysm , Rare Diseases , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-765281

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Surgical obliteration of ruptured aneurysm of the proximal posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) is challenging because of limited surgical accessibility. In recent years, coil embolization is the first-choice treatment for these lesions. However, coil embolization is not always easy in ruptured PICA aneurysm owing to the variable anatomical diversity of its shapes, its relationship to the parent artery, its low incidence, and accordingly, lesser neurointerventionist experience. METHODS: The parent artery and microcatheter for easier navigation and the embolization technique for stable coiling were identified. RESULTS: This study aimed to identify the more appropriate approach route, microcatheter, and strategies for an easier and safer, and more durable coil embolization in the treatment of lesions in the proximal PICA. CONCLUSION: Coil embolization for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured proximal PICA remains a challenge, but with the appropriate coiling plan, it can be treated successfully.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Aneurysm, Ruptured , Arteries , Embolization, Therapeutic , Humans , Incidence , Parents , Pica , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-788711

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Surgical obliteration of ruptured aneurysm of the proximal posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) is challenging because of limited surgical accessibility. In recent years, coil embolization is the first-choice treatment for these lesions. However, coil embolization is not always easy in ruptured PICA aneurysm owing to the variable anatomical diversity of its shapes, its relationship to the parent artery, its low incidence, and accordingly, lesser neurointerventionist experience.METHODS: The parent artery and microcatheter for easier navigation and the embolization technique for stable coiling were identified.RESULTS: This study aimed to identify the more appropriate approach route, microcatheter, and strategies for an easier and safer, and more durable coil embolization in the treatment of lesions in the proximal PICA.CONCLUSION: Coil embolization for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured proximal PICA remains a challenge, but with the appropriate coiling plan, it can be treated successfully.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Aneurysm, Ruptured , Arteries , Embolization, Therapeutic , Humans , Incidence , Parents , Pica , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-173863

ABSTRACT

Intracranial dissections commonly present as ischemic stroke and as hemorrhagic stroke. In general, while either ischemic stroke or hemorrhagic stroke may develop, the simultaneous onset of both may also occasionally occur. In this report, we present a case of simultaneous development of ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke due to an intracranial artery dissection.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm, Dissecting , Arteries , Carotid Artery, Internal , Stroke
8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-106734

ABSTRACT

For dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF), when the usual endovascular or neurosurgical approaches are difficult to treat, multi-modal treatment can be helpful. We present a case of a 71-year-old woman with DAVF, who presented with an intracerebral haemorrhage. Digital subtraction angiography revealed a DAVF of the transverse sinus, with cortical venous reflux. Transvenous and transarterial approaches for coil embolization failed. In the operating room, a small craniotomy was performed, and coil embolization was done under fluoroscopy. Transcranial venous embolization might be a useful method to occlude DAVF in a case that is difficult to access by usual surgical or endovascular approaches.


Subject(s)
Aged , Angiography, Digital Subtraction , Arteriovenous Fistula , Central Nervous System Vascular Malformations , Craniotomy , Embolization, Therapeutic , Endovascular Procedures , Female , Fluoroscopy , Humans , Methods , Neurosurgical Procedures , Operating Rooms , Transverse Sinuses
9.
Journal of Stroke ; : 102-113, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-135877

ABSTRACT

Patients with severe stroke due to acute large cerebral artery occlusion are likely to be severely disabled or dead without timely reperfusion. Previously, intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-TPA) within 4.5 hours after stroke onset was the only proven therapy, but IV-TPA alone does not sufficiently improve the outcome of patients with acute large artery occlusion. With the introduction of the advanced endovascular therapy, which enables more fast and more successful recanalization, recent randomized trials consecutively and consistently demonstrated the benefit of endovascular recanalization therapy (ERT) when added to IV-TPA. Accordingly, to update the recommendations, we assembled members of the writing committee appointed by the Korean Stroke Society, the Korean Society of Interventional Neuroradiology, and the Society of Korean Endovascular Neurosurgeons. Reviewing the evidences that have been accumulated, the writing members revised recommendations, for which formal consensus was achieved by convening a panel composed of 34 experts from the participating academic societies. The current guideline provides the evidence-based recommendations for ERT in patients with acute large cerebral artery occlusion regarding patient selection, treatment modalities, neuroimaging evaluation, and system organization.


Subject(s)
Arteries , Cerebral Arteries , Consensus , Humans , Neuroimaging , Patient Selection , Reperfusion , Stroke , Tissue Plasminogen Activator , Writing
10.
Journal of Stroke ; : 102-113, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-135872

ABSTRACT

Patients with severe stroke due to acute large cerebral artery occlusion are likely to be severely disabled or dead without timely reperfusion. Previously, intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-TPA) within 4.5 hours after stroke onset was the only proven therapy, but IV-TPA alone does not sufficiently improve the outcome of patients with acute large artery occlusion. With the introduction of the advanced endovascular therapy, which enables more fast and more successful recanalization, recent randomized trials consecutively and consistently demonstrated the benefit of endovascular recanalization therapy (ERT) when added to IV-TPA. Accordingly, to update the recommendations, we assembled members of the writing committee appointed by the Korean Stroke Society, the Korean Society of Interventional Neuroradiology, and the Society of Korean Endovascular Neurosurgeons. Reviewing the evidences that have been accumulated, the writing members revised recommendations, for which formal consensus was achieved by convening a panel composed of 34 experts from the participating academic societies. The current guideline provides the evidence-based recommendations for ERT in patients with acute large cerebral artery occlusion regarding patient selection, treatment modalities, neuroimaging evaluation, and system organization.


Subject(s)
Arteries , Cerebral Arteries , Consensus , Humans , Neuroimaging , Patient Selection , Reperfusion , Stroke , Tissue Plasminogen Activator , Writing
11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-37083

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To report the procedure related complication rate of endovascular treatments (EVTs) performed on patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) under local anesthesia (LA). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study enrolled 186 patients who underwent EVT for ruptured aneurysm under LA from January 2009 to December 2013. Procedure-related complications rate and factors associated with it were analyzed depending on the patients' factors, aneurysm factors and physician factors. RESULTS: Among the 186 patients who underwent EVT under LA, the respective rates of thromboembolic complication (TEC) and intraoperative rupture (IOR) were 12.8% (23 cases) and 12.9% (24 cases), respectively. Aneurysm size (≥ 7 mm) was the only risk factor for TEC (p = 0.048). CONCLUSION: Compared to previous result with under general anesthesia (GA), the rate of TEC was similar in patients treated under LA, but the IOR rate was significantly higher. The main reason for increasing IOR is considered as the unexpected patients' motion and in accordance with the unexpected movement of the microinstruments. Therefore, another methods to stabilize the patients or switching from LA to GA may be necessary when performing EVT, to reduce complications.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia, General , Anesthesia, Local , Aneurysm , Aneurysm, Ruptured , Endovascular Procedures , Humans , Risk Factors , Rupture , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
12.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-182777

ABSTRACT

Patients with severe stroke due to acute large cerebral artery occlusion are likely to be severely disabled or die if reperfusion is not achieved in a timely manner. Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-TPA) administered within 4.5 hours after stroke onset was previously the only proven therapy, but IV-TPA alone does not sufficiently improve the outcome of patients with acute large artery occlusion. With the introduction of the advanced endovascular therapy that enables faster and more successful recanalization, recent randomized trials consecutively and consistently demonstrated the benefit of adding endovascular recanalization therapy (ERT) to IV-TPA. Accordingly, to update the recommendations, we assembled members of a writing committee appointed by the Korean Stroke Society, the Korean Society of Interventional Neuroradiology, and the Society of Korean Endovascular Neurosurgeons. The writing committee revised recommendations based on a review of the accumulated evidence, and a formal consensus was achieved by convening a panel of 34 experts from the participating academic societies. The current guideline provides evidence-based recommendations for ERT in patients with acute large cerebral artery occlusion regarding patient selection, treatment modalities, neuroimaging evaluation, and system organization.


Subject(s)
Arteries , Cerebral Arteries , Consensus , Humans , Neuroimaging , Neurosurgeons , Patient Selection , Reperfusion , Stroke , Tissue Plasminogen Activator , Writing
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-125871

ABSTRACT

Traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the superficial temporal artery (STA) is an uncommon lesion and resection of the lesion is the treatment of choice. Three patients with traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the STA treated with only manual compression of the lesions were examined for this study. We report on an effective and safe minimally invasive technique for treatment of traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the STA.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm, False , Humans , Scalp , Temporal Arteries
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-114095

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: General anesthesia is often preferred for endovascular coiling of intracranial aneurysm at most centers. But in the authors' hospital, it is performed under monitored anesthesia care (MAC) using dexmedetomidine. To determine the feasibility and safety of this approach, the authors reviewed our initial experience. METHODS: Retrospective data was analyzed from July 2012 to November 2012. We performed coil embolization in 28 cases using this method. Among them, for statistical significance, we analyzed 12 cases in which the procedure time exceeded an hour. Vital signs were analyzed every 10 minutes. Depth of sedation was measured according to the Ramsay sedation scale and frequency of the repeated roadmap image(s) caused by movement of the patient's head during the procedure. RESULTS: All procedures were completed without occurrence of procedure related complications. Under MAC using dexmedetomidine, vital signs of the patients were stable, no statistical significance regarding hemodynamic and respiratory parameters was observed between time points (p>0.05). Adequate sedation was achieved. Mean Ramsay sedation scale was 3.67+/-1.61 (2 to 6). Repeated roadmap image(s) due to patient's factor occurred in only one case. The mean dosage of drug for adequate sedation for the procedure was 0.65+/-0.12 mcg/kg/hr without loading doses. CONCLUSION: To the best of my knowledge, this is the first report published in English using the method of monitored anesthesia with dexmedetomidine for intracranial aneurysm coiling. Monitored anesthesia care using dexmedetomidine without loading dose for embolization of intracranial aneurysms appeared to be a safe and effective alternative to general anesthesia.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , Anesthesia, General , Aneurysm , Dexmedetomidine , Embolization, Therapeutic , Head , Hemodynamics , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Retrospective Studies , Vital Signs
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-189710

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: There was no abundance of data on the use of anticoagulant in patients with previous high risk of thromboembolic conditions under a newly developed intracranial hemorrhage in Korean society. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety of discontinuance and suggest the proper time period for discontinuance of anticoagulant among these patients. METHODS: We reviewed the medical records of 19 patients who took anticoagulant because of thromboembolic problems and were admitted to our department with newly developed anticoagulation associated intracranial hemorrhage (AAICH), and stopped taking medicine due to concern of rebleeding from January 2008 to December 2012. Analysis of the incidence of thromboembolic complications and proper withdrawal time of anticoagulant was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: Our patients showed high risk for thromboembolic complication. The CHA2DS2-VASc score ranged from two to five. Thromboembolic complication occurred in eight (42.1%) out of 19 patients without restarting anticoagulant since the initial hemorrhage. Among them, three patients (37.5%) died from direct thromboembolic complications. Mean time to outbreak of thromboembolic complication was 21.38+/-14.89 days (range, 8-56 days). The probability of thromboembolic complications at 7, 14, and 30 days since cessation of anticoagulation was 0.00, 10.53, and 38.49%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Short term discontinuance of anticoagulant within seven days in patients with AAICH who are at high embolic risk (CHA2DS2-VASc score >2) appears to be relatively safe in Korean people. However, prolonged cessation (more than seven days) may result in increased incidence of catastrophic thromboembolic complications.


Subject(s)
Cerebral Hemorrhage , Hemorrhage , Humans , Incidence , Intracranial Hemorrhages , Medical Records , Methods
16.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-96987

ABSTRACT

Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) during pregnancy is quite rare, however it has a high maternal mortality rate. A pregnant woman in the 16th gestational week was admitted to our hospital with a drowsy level of consciousness. A brain magnetic resonance (MR) image showed hemorrhage on the prepontine cistern, and both sylvian fissures, and MR angiography and cerebral digital subtraction angiography demonstrated an aneurysm at the left posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). We performed endovascular coil embolization attempting to minimize radiation exposure. She was discharged with no neurologic deficit and delivered a healthy baby by cesarean section at the 38th week of gestation. This case study reported the shortest gestational period and this is the first report on an aneurysmal rupture arising from PICA which was treated using an endovascular method. Using an appropriate technique for reduced radiation exposure to the fetus and limited alterations in maternal-fetal physiology, endovascular coil embolization could guarantee good results in treatment of aneurysmal SAH in pregnant women.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Angiography , Angiography, Digital Subtraction , Arteries , Brain , Cesarean Section , Consciousness , Embolization, Therapeutic , Female , Fetus , Hemorrhage , Humans , Maternal Mortality , Neurologic Manifestations , Physiology , Pica , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , Rupture , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
17.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-28130

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The case fatality rate of nonlesional intracerebral hemorrhage (n-ICH) was high and not changed. Knowing the causes is important to their prevention; however, the reasons have not been studied. The aims of this study were to determine the cause of death, to improve the clinical outcomes. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed consecutive cases of nonlesional intracerebral hemorrhage in a prospective stroke registry from January 2010 to December 2010. RESULTS: Among 174 patients (61.83+/-13.36, 28-90 years), 29 patients (16.7%) died during hospitalization. Most common cause of death was initial neurological damage (41.4%, 12/29). Seventeen patients who survived the initial damage may then develop various potentially fatal complications. Except for death due to the initial neurological sequelae, death associated with immobilization (such as pneumonia or thromboembolic complication) was the most common in eight cases (8/17, 47.1%). However, death due to early rebleeding was not common and occurred in only 2 cases (2/17, 11.8%). Age, initial Glasgow Coma Scale, and diabetes mellitus were statistically significant factors influencing mortality (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: Mortality of n-ICH is still high. Initial neurological damage is the most important factor; however, non-neurological medical complications are a large part of case fatality. Most cases of death of patients who survived from the first bleeding were due to complications of immobilization. These findings have implications for clinical practice and planning of clinical trials. In addition, future conduct of a randomized study will be necessary in order to evaluate the benefits of early mobilization for prevention of immobilization related complications.


Subject(s)
Cause of Death , Cerebral Hemorrhage , Diabetes Mellitus , Early Ambulation , Glasgow Coma Scale , Hemorrhage , Hospitalization , Humans , Immobilization , Mortality , Pneumonia , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , Stroke
18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-141671

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The increased use of bypass surgery in the treatment of ischemic cerebrovascular diseases requires a better understanding of the superficial temporal artery (STA) anatomy. This study is to describe the gross anatomy of STA in adult Korean population with respect to cranial surgery and to provide basic anatomic data for bypass surgery. METHODS: The study evaluated retrospectively 35 patients who visited the neurosurgery department at a single institution. For each patient, both the left and right STA (70 vessels) were evaluated by a 3-dimensional computed tomographic angiogramfor diameter and anatomic relationships to external landmarks. RESULTS: Of 70 STAs, 69 had a bifurcation. Among these, 57 (82.6%) were above the superior margin of the zygomatic arch. The STA bifurcation was 53.2 +/- 5.9 mm posterior to the keyhole, 9.5 +/- 5.3 mm anterior to the posterior margin of condylar process of the mandible, and 21.7 +/- 15.8 mm superior to the superior margin of the zygomatic arch. The inner diameter of the STA was 1.8 +/- 0.5 mm at the superior margin of the zygomatic arch, and 1.4 +/- 0.4 mm and 1.4 +/- 0.5 mm for frontal and parietal branches, respectively. The 75.7% of frontal and 66.7% of parietal branches were suitable for microvascular anastomosis. CONCLUSION: This present study demonstrated the STA in Korean adults, which may benefit the clinician in dealing with the surgical procedures related to this STA.


Subject(s)
Adult , Carotid Arteries , Humans , Imidazoles , Mandible , Neurosurgery , Retrospective Studies , Temporal Arteries , Zygoma
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-141670

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The increased use of bypass surgery in the treatment of ischemic cerebrovascular diseases requires a better understanding of the superficial temporal artery (STA) anatomy. This study is to describe the gross anatomy of STA in adult Korean population with respect to cranial surgery and to provide basic anatomic data for bypass surgery. METHODS: The study evaluated retrospectively 35 patients who visited the neurosurgery department at a single institution. For each patient, both the left and right STA (70 vessels) were evaluated by a 3-dimensional computed tomographic angiogramfor diameter and anatomic relationships to external landmarks. RESULTS: Of 70 STAs, 69 had a bifurcation. Among these, 57 (82.6%) were above the superior margin of the zygomatic arch. The STA bifurcation was 53.2 +/- 5.9 mm posterior to the keyhole, 9.5 +/- 5.3 mm anterior to the posterior margin of condylar process of the mandible, and 21.7 +/- 15.8 mm superior to the superior margin of the zygomatic arch. The inner diameter of the STA was 1.8 +/- 0.5 mm at the superior margin of the zygomatic arch, and 1.4 +/- 0.4 mm and 1.4 +/- 0.5 mm for frontal and parietal branches, respectively. The 75.7% of frontal and 66.7% of parietal branches were suitable for microvascular anastomosis. CONCLUSION: This present study demonstrated the STA in Korean adults, which may benefit the clinician in dealing with the surgical procedures related to this STA.


Subject(s)
Adult , Carotid Arteries , Humans , Imidazoles , Mandible , Neurosurgery , Retrospective Studies , Temporal Arteries , Zygoma
20.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-71548

ABSTRACT

Fusiform aneurysms on the basilar artery (BA) trunk are rare. The microsurgical management of these aneurysms is difficult because of their deep location, dense collection of vital cranial nerves, and perforating arteries to the brain stem. Endovascular treatment is relatively easier and safer compared with microsurgical treatment. Selective occlusion of the aneurysmal sac with preservation of the parent artery is the endovascular treatment of choice. But, some cases, particularly giant or fusiform aneurysms, are unsuitable for selective sac occlusion. Therefore, endovascular coiling of the aneurysm with parent vessel occlusion is an alternative treatment option. In this situation, it is important to determine whether a patient can tolerate parent vessel occlusion without developing neurological deficits. We report a rare case of fusiform aneurysms in the BA trunk. An 18-year-old female suffered a headache for 2 weeks. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance image revealed a fusiform aneurysm of the lower basilar artery trunk. Digital subtraction angiography revealed a 7.1x11.0 mm-sized fusiform aneurysm located between vertebrovasilar junction and the anterior inferior cerebellar arteries. We had good clinical result using endovascular coiling of unruptured fusiform aneurysm on the lower BA trunk with parent vessel occlusion after confirming the tolerance of the patient by balloon test occlusion with induced hypotension and accompanied by neurophysiologic monitoring, transcranial Doppler and single photon emission computed tomography. In this study, we discuss the importance of preoperative meticulous studies for avoidance of delayed neurological deficit in the patient with fusiform aneurysm on lower basilar trunk.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Angiography, Digital Subtraction , Arteries , Basilar Artery , Brain Stem , Cranial Nerves , Female , Glycosaminoglycans , Headache , Humans , Hypotension , Intracranial Aneurysm , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Parents , Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon
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