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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-926586

ABSTRACT

The Rh blood group system has C, D, E, c, and e as the main antigens, but ce(f) has been reported as a compound antigen. Anti-f(ce) is an unexpected antibody (Ab) against the ce(f) compound antigen. This paper reports a case with anti-f(ce) and anti-M Abs in a patient with liver cirrhosis. A 47-year-old male patient was repeatedly admitted to hospital due to recurrent hepatic encephalopathy. He showed disorientation and was admitted. A packed red blood cells (pRBCs) transfusion was required, and Ab identification test identified anti-f(ce) and anti-M Abs. Anti-f(ce) Ab can cause fetal neonatal hemolytic disease and a clinically serious hemolytic transfusion reaction (HTR), and anti-M Ab can cause a HTR when it reacts at 37℃. RBCs with Rh haplotype of CDe and negative for M antigen were transfused to the patient. There was no HTR. The possibility of an anti-f(ce) Ab was not considered when an unexpected Ab screening/identification test was performed. It was simply reported as an ‘unknown alloantibody’. Therefore, laboratory physicians should consider Abs to the Rh compound antigen when Abs to Rh antigens are identified, and efforts should be made to identify them to gain basic knowledge about Abs against Rh compound antigens.

2.
Blood Research ; : S6-S10, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-925636

ABSTRACT

Platelet transfusion refractoriness (PTR), in which platelet counts do not increase after transfusion, occurs in many patients receiving platelet transfusions. PTR is a clinical condition that can harm patients. The causes of PTR can be divided into two types: immune and non-immune. Most cases of PTR are non-immune. Among immune causes, the most common is human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules. PTR caused by anti-HLA antibodies is usually managed by transfusing HLA-matched platelets. Therefore, it is important, especially for hemato-oncologists who frequently perform transfusion, to accurately diagnose whether the cause of platelet transfusion failure is alloimmune or non-immunological when determining the treatment direction for the patient. In this review, we discuss the definitions, causes, countermeasures, and prevention methods of PTR.

3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-917540

ABSTRACT

Background@#Pretransfusion testing is vital for safe transfusion. However, in situations without time to perform sufficient testing, all or part of the pretransfusion testing may be skipped to issue blood quickly. This study evaluated the safety of red blood cell (RBC) transfusion released by an emergency blood transfusion protocol through retrospective analysis at a tertiary hospital for eight years. @*Methods@#All RBC transfusions following the emergency blood transfusion protocol from 2011 to 2018 at Seoul National University Hospital were included in the study. Crossmatching and unexpected antibody screening test results conducted after RBC release and the occurrence of hemolytic transfusion reactions were analyzed. @*Results@#A total of 1,541 cases (5,299 RBCs issued) of emergency blood transfusion were identified. RBCs were issued after performing the immediate spin crossmatch without an unexpected antibody screening test in most cases (1,443; 93.64%), while RBCs were issued with no pretransfusion testing in 98 cases (6.36%). Antibody screening tests performed after the issue of RBCs showed that 17 (1.1%) cases were positive. Two units of RBCs from two different cases showed positive antiglobulin crossmatch test results. However, none of them were suspected to be associated with a hemolytic transfusion reaction. @*Conclusion@#The incidence of incompatible RBC release was very low in patients receiving RBC transfusion through the emergency blood transfusion protocol suggesting it can be used safely with minimal risk of hemolytic transfusion reactions caused by incompatible blood transfusions.

4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-917539

ABSTRACT

Background@#According to the revision of the Blood Management Act in 2020, medical institutions that meet certain conditions are obliged to install a transfusion management division in Korea. Therefore, this study assessed the management status of the transfusion management division at major medical institutions. @*Methods@#From August 7th to August 18th, 2021, a survey questionnaire was given to laboratory physicians of 10 major medical institutions in Korea, and the installation and operation of the transfusion management division were surveyed. @*Results@#The medical institutions that participated in this survey completed a transfusion management division in the first half of the year. Doctors, nurses, and medical technologists were assigned as medical personnel, and all laboratory physicians were leading the work as the head of the transfusion management division. Regarding the tasks performed at the transfusion management division, all medical institutions conducted a transfusion appropriateness assessment, education related to transfusion, and adverse transfusion reactions. Most medical institutions had difficulties because there was an insufficient basis to calculate the workforce and budget in installing and operating the transfusion management division. @*Conclusion@#There are rarely reference materials for the practice and operation of the transfusion management division, which has no precedent in Korea, so it is often difficult for medical institutions to prepare it. This study will be a reference for medical institutions that need to install a transfusion management division in the future.Efforts should be made to legislate transfusion management fees focused on the academic community.

5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-874160

ABSTRACT

Background@#Reference intervals defined for adults or children of other ethnicities cannot be applied in the evaluation of Korean pediatric patients. Pediatric reference intervals are difficult to establish because children are in their growing stage and their physiology changes continuously. We aimed to establish reference intervals for routine laboratory tests for Korean pediatric patients through retrospective multicenter data analysis. @*Methods@#Preoperative laboratory test results from 1,031 pediatric patients aged 0 month–18 years who underwent minor surgeries in four university hospitals were collected. Age- and sex-specific reference intervals for routine laboratory tests were defined based on the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) EP28-A3c guidelines. @*Results@#The pediatric reference intervals determined in this study were different from existing adult reference intervals and pediatric reference intervals for other ethnicities. Most tests required age-specific partitioning, and some of those required sex-specific partitioning for at least one age-partitioned subgroup. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, monocyte percentage, basophil percentage, activated partial thromboplastin time, glucose, cholesterol, albumin, bilirubin, chloride, and C-reactive protein did not show any difference between age- or sex-partitioned subgroups. @*Conclusions@#We determined Korean pediatric reference intervals for hematology, coagulation, and chemistry tests by indirect sampling based on medical record data from multiple institutions. These reference intervals would be valuable for clinical evaluations in the Korean pediatric population.

6.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-836479

ABSTRACT

ABO-incompatible solid organ transplantation (ABOi TPL) is a widely accepted treatment option for treating end-stage renal or liver diseases. Although the appropriate selection of the ABO blood group for transfusion is a key step for successful ABOi TPL, there are no evidence-based guidelines to cope with this issue. In this letter, we suggest appropriate blood selection criteria for ABOi TPL based on the basic principles of ABO incompatibility. For major mismatched ABOi TPL, red blood cells (RBCs) should be of the organ recipient’s ABO group, while platelets (PLTs) and plasma products should be of the donor’s ABO group. For the bidirectional mismatched cases, it is desirable to select recipient type RBCs and group AB PLTs and plasma products.

7.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-836066

ABSTRACT

This report summarizes the 2019 survey results of the external quality assessment (EQA) scheme for the Transfusion Medicine Program (TMP) in Korea. Proficiency testing materials were prepared at the Asan Medical Center for the biannual distribution to participating laboratories. The average accuracy rates and number of participants (in parenthesis) for ten survey items were as follows: ABO typing, 99.4%–99.9% (N=875); RhD typing, 99.8%–100% (N=864); crossmatching, 90.8%–99.6% (N=760); ABO subtyping, 98.2% and 100% (N=58); Rh CcEe antigen testing, both 100% (N=55); weak D test, 97.9%–100% (N=232); antibody screening, 99.7%– 100% (N=316); direct antiglobulin test (DAT) using a polyspecific reagent, 99.6%–100% (N=273); DAT using an immunoglobulin-G monospecific reagent, both 100.0% (N=67); DAT using a C3d monospecific reagent, 95.6%–98.5% (N=67); antibody identification, 87.9%–99.2% (N=132); and ABO Ab titration, 85.7%–100% (N=134). The number of participants showed an average increase of 14% across the ten survey items, with the ABO antibody titration showing the highest increase at 83.6%. While results were generally excellent, antibody identification and ABO antibody titration results showed room for improvement. The 2019 EQA scheme for TMP has contributed to the improvement and maintenance of the participating laboratories to the program.

8.
Laboratory Medicine Online ; : 330-333, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-902673

ABSTRACT

Hu5F9-G4, an immunoglobulin 4 (IgG4) monoclonal humanized antibody targeting CD47, is under active clinical trials as a novel immunotherapeutic for hematologic and solid malignancies and can cause pretransfusion testing interference. In this study, we demonstrate our first experience of Hu5F9-G4 interference with serologic testing and mitigate this interference through multiple platelet alloadsorption. A 69-year-old woman with a history of ureter cancer presented with anemia. On routine blood group typing, the patient showed strong agglutination (4+) with anti-A, A, and B cells. Unexpectedly, antibody screening and identification showed panreactivity to all panel cells, although the autocontrol result was negative. Medical records revealed that she was enrolled in an anti-CD47 clinical trial. To eliminate interference by the drug, we attempted alloadsorption using pooled platelets that were prepared from segments of random single donor platelets. After seven alloadsorption sessions using pooled allogeneic platelets, the ABO discrepancy and panreactivity was resolved. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of anti-CD47 interference elimination in Korea.

9.
Laboratory Medicine Online ; : 330-333, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-894969

ABSTRACT

Hu5F9-G4, an immunoglobulin 4 (IgG4) monoclonal humanized antibody targeting CD47, is under active clinical trials as a novel immunotherapeutic for hematologic and solid malignancies and can cause pretransfusion testing interference. In this study, we demonstrate our first experience of Hu5F9-G4 interference with serologic testing and mitigate this interference through multiple platelet alloadsorption. A 69-year-old woman with a history of ureter cancer presented with anemia. On routine blood group typing, the patient showed strong agglutination (4+) with anti-A, A, and B cells. Unexpectedly, antibody screening and identification showed panreactivity to all panel cells, although the autocontrol result was negative. Medical records revealed that she was enrolled in an anti-CD47 clinical trial. To eliminate interference by the drug, we attempted alloadsorption using pooled platelets that were prepared from segments of random single donor platelets. After seven alloadsorption sessions using pooled allogeneic platelets, the ABO discrepancy and panreactivity was resolved. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of anti-CD47 interference elimination in Korea.

10.
Laboratory Medicine Online ; : 254-257, 2019.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-760508

ABSTRACT

A 67-year-old man previously diagnosed with ulcerative colitis complained of difficulty in defecation and underwent balloon dilatation of rectum, but the procedure failed. The patient was transferred to a surgical department for further treatment. Before surgery, his red cells were typed A, Rh(D) positive. The antibody screening test was positive and the results of the identification tests were atypical. The reactivity was similar to anti-Le(b) antibody; however, the antibody showed panreactivity against papainized red cells. It showed stronger reactivity against O red cells than A Le(a−b+) red cells, and we concluded that the antibody was anti-Le(bH). After reexamination, his Lewis phenotype was found to be Le(a−b−). His FUT2 and FUT3 were analyzed to confirm his Lewis blood type, and c.59T>G and c.1067T>A variants were found on the FUT3. Therefore, the patient's Lewis blood type was concluded as Le(a−b−).


Subject(s)
Aged , Colitis, Ulcerative , Defecation , Dilatation , Humans , Mass Screening , Papain , Phenotype , Rectum , Ulcer
11.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-765647

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Transfusion in neonates and infants can be performed using an electromechanical infusion system that has appropriate accuracy in terms of flow rate, volume, and bolus. However, there are no infusion systems approved for transfusion in Korea. In this study, we evaluate the performance of two electromechanical infusion systems for transfusion in pediatric patients. METHODS: We tested two systems, Baxter and Terumo, using 9 units of leukocyte-filtered red blood cells. The blood samples were delivered through the systems at constant speeds of 10, 30, and 100 mL/hr, and the accuracy in terms of the delivered volume was estimated. Before and after infusion, hemoglobin, hematocrit, plasma hemoglobin, potassium, and lactate dehydrogenase levels were measured in each sample. The percentage of hemolysis (%Hemolysis) was calculated to evaluate the safety of the infusion systems. RESULTS: For Terumo, the mean error rate of the infused volume was less than 5%. We expect that Terumo can transfuse blood at a volume close to the set volume. Further, both infusion systems showed acceptable %Hemolysis levels (mean±standard deviation: Terumo, 0.14±0.04; Baxter, 0.17±0.06). CONCLUSIONS: Both infusion systems can be used safely for transfusion in pediatric patients.


Subject(s)
Erythrocyte Transfusion , Erythrocytes , Hematocrit , Hemolysis , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Korea , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase , Plasma , Potassium
12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-765088

ABSTRACT

Para-Bombay phenotypes are rare blood groups that have inherent defects in producing H antigens associated with FUT1 and/or FUT2. We report the first case of para-Bombay blood type in a Southeast Asian patient admitted at a tertiary hospital in Korea. A 23-year-old Indonesian man presented to the hospital with fever and was diagnosed with a disseminated nontuberculous mycobacterium infection and anemia. During blood group typing for blood transfusion, cell typing showed no agglutination with both anti-A and anti-B reagents. Serum typing showed strong reactivity against B cells and trace agglutination pattern with A1 cells. His red blood cells failed to react with anti-H reagents. Direct sequencing of FUT1 and FUT2 revealed a missense variation, c.328G>A (p.Ala110Thr, rs56342683, FUT1*01W.02), and a synonymous variant, c.390C>T (p.Asn130=, rs281377, Se³⁵⁷), respectively. This highlights the need for both forward and reverse grouping.


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System , Agglutination , Anemia , Asians , B-Lymphocytes , Blood Group Antigens , Blood Transfusion , Erythrocytes , Fever , Humans , Indicators and Reagents , Korea , Mycobacterium Infections, Nontuberculous , Phenotype , Tertiary Care Centers , Young Adult
13.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-759590

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The risk of transfusion-transmissible infections (TTIs) of HBV, HCV, and HIV in Korea has been reduced significantly by strengthening the blood safety policies. On the other hand, the risk of TTI still exists due to the diagnostic window period or viral variants. METHODS: The residual risks of TTI of HBV, HCV, and HIV were calculated from July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2018 by dividing the data into two year sets. The residual risk was conducted by separating the donors who donated only once and those who donated more than once during each period. RESULTS: In the first two years, the residual risks of HBV, HCV, and HIV were calculated to be 17.54/106, 0.42/106, and 0.30/106 respectively. The residual risk of HBV and HCV over the last two years was calculated to be 9.41/106 and 0.27/106, showing a tendency to decrease with time. On the other hand, the residual risk of HIV over the last two years was calculated to be 0.29/106, showing no significant difference. The residual risk in the donors who donated only once was higher than that in the donors who donated more than once during each period. CONCLUSION: The real transfusion-transmitted infection can be different from the estimated residual risk in this study because this study was based on the thesis that all NAT-reactive blood components cause infection. Because the residual risk of HBV is higher than HCV and HIV, it was considered that the safety measures for the HBV need to be improved continuously.


Subject(s)
Blood Safety , Hand , HIV , Humans , Korea , Tissue Donors
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-719648

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Automated Fluorescent Immunoassay System (AFIAS) rotavirus assay (Boditech Med Inc., Chuncheon, Korea) is a new rapid antigen test for rotavirus detection. We evaluated the performance of this assay for detecting rotaviruses and their specific genotypes in clinical stool samples. METHODS: AFIAS rotavirus assay was performed in 103 rotavirus-positive and 103 rotavirus-negative stool samples (confirmed by both PCR and ELISA), and its results were compared with those of PCR, ELISA, and immunochromatographic assay (ICA). We evaluated diagnostic sensitivity/specificity, the detectability of rotavirus subtypes, lower limit of detection (LLOD), reproducibility, cross-reactivity, and interference of AFIAS rotavirus assay. RESULTS: Based on PCR and ELISA results, diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the AFIAS rotavirus assay were both 99.0%. LLOD results showed that the AFIAS assay had sensitivity similar to or greater than ICA and ELISA. High reproducibility was confirmed, and no cross-reactivity or interference was detected. This assay could detect genotypes G1P[8], G2P[4], G3P[8], G4P[6], G4P[8], G8P[4], G8P[8], G9P[4], and G9P[8]. CONCLUSIONS: The AFIAS rotavirus assay showed high reproducibility, sensitivity, and specificity as well as excellent agreement with ELISA, PCR, and ICA. It detected the most common as well as unusual genotypes of rotavirus prevalent in Korea. It could be a useful on-site assay for rapid, convenient, and cost-effective detection of rotavirus infection.


Subject(s)
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Genotype , Immunoassay , Chromatography, Affinity , Korea , Limit of Detection , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Rotavirus Infections , Rotavirus , Sensitivity and Specificity
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-714435

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Diarrhea has been the second leading cause of death among children under the age of five, and the rapid and accurate pathogen diagnosis in patients with diarrhea is crucial for reducing morbidity and mortality. A newly developed one-step multiplex real-time PCR assay, the Allplex GI-Virus Assay, was evaluated for its ability to detect six diarrhea-causing viruses (rotavirus, norovirus genogroup I (GI) and genogroup II (GII), enteric adenovirus, astrovirus, and sapovirus) in stool samples. METHODS: The performance of the Allplex assay was compared with those of another multiplex PCR assay (Seeplex Diarrhea-V Ace Detection) and genotyping by sequencing, using 446 stool samples from patients with acute gastroenteritis. RESULTS: The overall agreement rates between the results of the Allplex and Seeplex assays were 98.7% for rotavirus, 99.1% for norovirus GI, 93.3% for norovirus GII, 98.0% for adenovirus, and 99.6% for astrovirus. The overall agreement rates between the Allplex assay and genotyping were 99.1% for rotavirus, 99.1% for norovirus GI, 98.7% for norovirus GII, 89.7% for adenovirus, 98.2% for astrovirus, and 99.8% for sapovirus. In addition, eight rotavirus genotypes, three norovirus GI genotypes, four norovirus GII genotypes, eight adenovirus genotypes, two astrovirus genotypes, and two sapovirus genotypes were detected. CONCLUSIONS: The Allplex assay showed high agreement with Seeplex and genotyping results, and was able to additionally detect sapoviruses. The Allplex assay could be useful in identifying viral gastrointestinal infections in patients with acute gastroenteritis symptoms.


Subject(s)
Adenoviridae , Cause of Death , Child , Diagnosis , Diarrhea , Gastroenteritis , Genotype , Humans , Mortality , Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction , Norovirus , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Rotavirus , Sapovirus
16.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-713888

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The returning time of inpatient specimen analysis is usually slow because phlebotomists deliver all the collected specimens at the end of their work cycle. In addition, manual specimen reception further delays the reporting time and imposes a heavy workload on the technical staff, thus compromising effectiveness. Therefore, we have created an automated specimen reception system to tackle testing delays and enhance the efficiency and quality of specimen collection and handling. METHODS: In May 2015, the pre-analytical processing of inpatient samples was renovated. We automated the specimen reception in parallel with barcode printing and introduced pneumatic tubes to deliver samples for routine chemistry tests. We compared the reporting time of the automated system with that of the manual system and analyzed the distribution pattern of the specimens according to handling time. RESULTS: The median reporting time was advanced by 41 minutes, from 09:33 AM to 08:52 AM for the manual and automated reception, respectively. Moreover, with the reduction in hands-on time, the blood specimens reached the laboratory immediately after phlebotomy, thereby improving the processing efficiency by spreading out the interval during which the specimens arrived in the laboratory. Additionally, the new system allowed the identification of the phlebotomist who collected the specimens and tracking the specimens from collection to test result. CONCLUSIONS: With the introduction of our automatic reception system, the reporting time was considerably reduced. Therefore, the satisfaction of the clinician and the technical staff was improved.


Subject(s)
Chemistry , Humans , Inpatients , Phlebotomy , Specimen Handling
17.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-717059

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) is an important indicator of albuminuria. We aimed to estimate ACR uncertainty and its impact on test results and proposed imprecision quality goals based on the estimated uncertainty. METHODS: The combined ACR uncertainty was calculated using the individual uncertainties of urinary albumin and creatinine. ACR confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated based on the expanded uncertainty. When the CI contained the ACR category boundary (30 or 300 mg/g), the cases were considered ambiguous. Quality goals for ACR were suggested using the number of ambiguous cases among actual patient results. RESULTS: The number of ambiguous cases resulting from the combined ACR uncertainty was higher than expected based on biological variation (BV) quality goals. When the ACR met BV quality specifications, we estimated that 4.8–15.5% of the results may have been misclassified. To minimize the number of ambiguous results, the minimum, desirable, and optimum quality goals were set at 34.0%, 18.0%, and 4.5%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We expressed ACR uncertainty using the uncertainties of urinary albumin and creatinine and assessed the impact of this combined uncertainty on the test results. Subsequently, we proposed imprecision quality goals for ACR based on ambiguous results.


Subject(s)
Albuminuria , Creatinine , Humans , Uncertainty
18.
19.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-716146

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Phlebotomy performed for laboratory testing has the potential to cause anemia in newborns and infants. This study investigated the minimum specimen volume required for an automated immunohematology analyzer DAYmate S. METHODS: Three combinations of tubes were evaluated: I. 6 mL EDTA tube, II. 0.5 mL microtainer (on top of 3 mL EDTA tube), and III. 1 mL sample cup (on top of 6 mL EDTA tube). ABO/RhD cell typing was done using centrifuged red cells; unexpected antibody screening was carried out using plasma, and Type & Screening was conducted using whole blood samples. The lowest specimen volume capable of performing 10 repetitive tests without errors was investigated. RESULTS: ABO/RhD cell typing could be performed from I. 30 μL, II. 25 μL, and III. 25 μL. Unexpected antibody screening could be performed from I. 170 μL, II. 150 μL, and III. 140 μL. According to the hematocrit levels, Type & Screening could be performed from 30%, I&III 650 μL, II. 800 μL; 40%, I&III 650 μL, II. 900 μL; and 50%, I&III 1,000 μL, II. Testing using specimen volumes below 1,000 μL was difficult. CONCLUSION: By separating red cells and plasma, pre-transfusion testing of ABO/RhD cell typing and unexpected antibody screening could be conducted with very small specimen volumes using DAYmate S compared to Type & Screening using whole blood. The application of small-sized sample tubes was more competitive and this is expected to be very useful for preventing iatrogenic anemia in neonates and infants less than 4 months old.


Subject(s)
Anemia , Edetic Acid , Hematocrit , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Mass Screening , Phlebotomy , Plasma
20.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-168476

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The accurate and rapid identification of the causative viruses is important for the timely diagnosis and management of respiratory infections. Multiplex molecular diagnostic techniques have been widely adopted to detect respiratory viruses. We compared the results of a newly upgraded, multiplex, molecular bead-based respiratory viral panel (RVP) assay with the results of Anyplex II RV16 detection kit and AdvanSure RV real-time RT-PCR assay. METHODS: We tested 254 respiratory specimens and cultured viral strains using the Luminex xTAG RVP Fast v2 assay (Luminex Molecular Diagnostics, Canada) and Anyplex II RV16 detection kit and compared the results. Specimens showing discordant results between the two assays were tested with a AdvanSure RV real-time RT-PCR assay. RESULTS: Of the 254 respiratory specimens, there was total agreement in the results between the xTAG RVP Fast v2 assay and the other real-time PCR assay in 94.1–100% of the specimens. The agreement levels were relatively low (94.1–97.6%) for specimens of adenovirus, coronavirus NL63, and parainfluenza type 3. In comparison to the other assay, the xTAG RVP Fast v2 assay detected a higher number of parainfluenza type 3 (4 cases) and metapneumovirus (9 cases). CONCLUSIONS: The xTAG RVP Fast v2 assay showed comparable capabilities compared with the other assays; it will be useful for identifying respiratory viral infections in patients with respiratory symptoms. Clinicians should be aware of the characteristics of the assays they use, since different assays show different detectability for each virus.


Subject(s)
Adenoviridae , Coronavirus , Diagnosis , Humans , Metapneumovirus , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques , Paramyxoviridae Infections , Pathology, Molecular , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Respiratory Tract Infections
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