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1.
Neurointervention ; : 46-51, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-875327

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Microcatheter navigation into an aneurysm sac can present difficulties through negative interactions between the deployed stent mesh and microcatheter. We hypothesized that endothelialization of the stent mesh would minimize these interactions. We aimed to assess the feasibility of staged coiling after stenting by reviewing our experiences with unavoidably staged embolization cases. @*Materials and Methods@#Between 2011 and 2019, 7 patients (mean age 57.2 years, range 49–76 years) including 5 females, experienced 9 unruptured aneurysms treated with staged stenting and coiling due to unstable microcatheter navigation into the aneurysm after stent placement. The aneurysms were in the paraclinoid internal carotid artery (ICA) (n=3), ophthalmic origin ICA (n=1), superior cerebellar artery origin (n=2), basilar tip (n=2), and the middle cerebral artery bifurcation (n=1). The stents used were the Neuroform Atlas (n=4), Neuroform EZ (n=2), and Low-profile Visualized Intraluminal Support Blue (n=1). @*Results@#The mean interval between stenting and coiling was 15 weeks (range, 12–21 weeks). The average navigation time between the first roadmap imaging and microcatheter insertion in the sac was 14 minutes (range, 8–20 minutes). One aneurysm was occluded without further coiling on follow-up. Staged coiling successfully treated the remaining aneurysms (n=8). No complications were identified. @*Conclusion@#In cases of difficult intra-saccular catheterization, intentional staged coiling may be a feasible option for stent-assisted coiling of the cerebral aneurysms.

2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-899085

ABSTRACT

We report a case of lateral cavernous sinus wall dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) accompanied large venous aneurysm which is presented intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). A 58-year-old male patient came to emergency department for acute onset of headache and dysarthria. In brain computed tomography scan, large left temporal lobe ICH was noted. In transfemoral cerebral angiography, multiple arteries from external carotid artery and left internal carotid artery (ICA) fed arteriovenous shunt. This shunt was drained through cavernous sinus with enlarged multiple cortical veins. One large venous aneurysm was estimated as bleeding focus for ICH. Considering ICH and high flow shunt, we planned urgent treatment to reduce flow of arteriovenous shunt. However, transvenous embolization was failed due to tortuous venous anatomy. Therefore, we planned craniotomy and microsurgical treatment. There was engorged small vessel in lateral wall of cavernous sinus and vascular trunk which is fistulous connection was noted. Fistula connection was obliterated and disconnected after coagulation. In postoperative image, fistula was completely disappeared and there was no cortical venous reflux, also large venous aneurysm was disappeared. Patient recovered very well without new neurological deficits. We reported successfully treated lateral cavernous sinus wall DAVF by combined endovascular and transcranial-microsurgical treatment.

3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-891381

ABSTRACT

We report a case of lateral cavernous sinus wall dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) accompanied large venous aneurysm which is presented intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). A 58-year-old male patient came to emergency department for acute onset of headache and dysarthria. In brain computed tomography scan, large left temporal lobe ICH was noted. In transfemoral cerebral angiography, multiple arteries from external carotid artery and left internal carotid artery (ICA) fed arteriovenous shunt. This shunt was drained through cavernous sinus with enlarged multiple cortical veins. One large venous aneurysm was estimated as bleeding focus for ICH. Considering ICH and high flow shunt, we planned urgent treatment to reduce flow of arteriovenous shunt. However, transvenous embolization was failed due to tortuous venous anatomy. Therefore, we planned craniotomy and microsurgical treatment. There was engorged small vessel in lateral wall of cavernous sinus and vascular trunk which is fistulous connection was noted. Fistula connection was obliterated and disconnected after coagulation. In postoperative image, fistula was completely disappeared and there was no cortical venous reflux, also large venous aneurysm was disappeared. Patient recovered very well without new neurological deficits. We reported successfully treated lateral cavernous sinus wall DAVF by combined endovascular and transcranial-microsurgical treatment.

5.
Neurointervention ; : 25-30, 2020.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-837040

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#We present ultrasound-guided percutaneous low-dose thrombin (200–250 IU) injection for the treatment of iatrogenic femoral pseudoaneurysms. Second, we compared patient and procedure factors between subcutaneous hematoma and pseudoaneurysm groups. @*Materials and Methods@#From April 2012 to May 2018, 8425 patients underwent neurointervention. Among these patients, 18 had small subcutaneous hematomas and 6 had pseudoaneurysms. Pseudoaneurysms in the neck and entire sac were visualized, and low-dose thrombins were injected while visualizing a “whirlpool” hyperechoic core in the pseudoaneurysm sac. Subcutaneous hematomas were treated with simple compression. We compared the following parameters between the subcutaneous hematoma group and pseudoaneurysm group: sex, age, body mass index (BMI), type of procedure, heparin usage, sheath size, procedure time, and number of previous neurointervention procedures with the Mann-Whitney U test. @*Results@#Most of the pseudoaneurysms were successfully occluded with 200 IU of thrombin (n=5). Only 1 pseudoaneurysm required a slightly higher thrombin concentration (250 IU, n=1). During the short-term follow-up, no residual sac was observed and no surgical repair was necessary. Pain in the groin region was alleviated. During the 1-month follow-up, no evidence of pseudoaneurysm recurrence nor subcutaneous hematoma was noted. Patient factors (sex, age, and BMI) and procedure factors (heparin usage, sheath size, procedure time, number of previous procedures) were not statistically different between the subcutaneous hematoma and pseudoaneurysm groups. @*Conclusion@#Ultrasound-guided percutaneous low-dose thrombin injection (200–250 IU) is safe, effective, and less invasive for treating iatrogenic femoral pseudoaneurysm in neurointervention.

6.
Neurointervention ; : 67-73, 2020.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-837024

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#We applied a low-dose fluoroscopic protocol in routine diagnostic cerebral angiography and evaluated the feasibility of the protocol. @*Materials and Methods@#We retrospectively reviewed a total of 60 patients who underwent diagnostic cerebral angiography for various neurovascular diseases from September to November 2019. Routine protocols were used for patients in the first phase and low-dose protocols in the second phase. We compared radiation dose, fluoroscopy time, and complications between groups. @*Results@#Age, diseases, and operators were not significantly different between the two groups. The mean fluoroscopy dose significantly decreased by 52% in the low-dose group (3.09 vs. 6.38 Gy·cm2 ); however, the total dose was not significantly different between the two groups (34.07 vs. 33.70 Gy·cm2 ). The total fluoroscopic time was slightly longer in the low-dose group, but the difference was not statistically significant (12.2. vs. 12.5 minutes). In all patients, angiography was successfully performed without complications. @*Conclusion@#The low-dose fluoroscopy protocol is feasible to apply for diagnostic cerebral angiography in that this protocol could significantly reduce the fluoroscopic dose.

7.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-835657

ABSTRACT

Objective@#Several studies have reported that the outcomes of endovascular treatment were superior to those of microsurgical treatment for posterior circulation aneurysms. Thus, this study compared outcomes of endovascular and microsurgical treatment for posterior circulation aneurysms and assess the usefulness of microsurgery in these patients. @*Methods@#Outcomes were retrospectively evaluated after endovascular and microsurgical treatment of 621 posterior circulation aneurysms. The 621 aneurysms included 187 treated by surgical clipping and 434 treated by endovascular coiling. @*Results@#In patients with unruptured aneurysms the rates of residual lesions and retreatment were significantly lower in those who underwent microsurgical than endovascular treatment. However immediate postoperative and 6 month follow-up Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) scores did not differ significantly in the two groups. In patients with ruptured aneurysms, the rates of residual lesions and retreatment were significantly lower in the microsurgery than in the endovascular treatment group. Even so immediate postoperative and 6 month follow-up GOS scores did not differ significantly in the two groups. @*Conclusions@#Endovascular treatment has increasingly become an alternative modality for microsurgery in posterior circulation aneurysm, whereas the indication for microsurgery is greatly reduced. However, the absolute number of microsurgery is maintained showing that it is a still valuable technique, as advances in endovascular or stent-assisted coiling have not solved many of the challenges inherent in the management of complex aneurysms. Hence, the advantages and limitations of both modalities must be carefully concerned in posterior circulation aneurysm to obtain favorable outcome.

8.
Journal of Stroke ; : 234-244, 2020.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-834658

ABSTRACT

Background@#and Purpose The outcome of endovascular treatment (EVT) may differ depending on the etiology of arterial occlusion. This study aimed to assess the differences in EVT outcomes in patients with intracranial arterial steno-occlusion (ICAS-O), artery-to-artery embolism (AT-O), and cardiac embolism (CA-O). @*Methods@#We retrospectively analyzed 330 patients with ischemic stroke who underwent EVT between January 2012 and August 2017. Patients were classified according to the etiology. The clinical data, EVT-related factors, and clinical outcomes were compared. The modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score at 3 months, determined using ordinal logistic regression (shift analysis), was the primary outcome. @*Results@#CA-O (n=149) was the most common etiology, followed by ICAS-O (n=63) and AT-O (n=49). Age, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, and rate of hemorrhagic transformation were significantly higher in patients with CA-O compared to AT-O and ICAS-O. The time from onset-to-recanalization was the shortest in the CA-O (356.0 minutes) groups, followed by the AT-O (847.0 minutes) and ICAS-O (944.0 minutes) groups. The rates of successful recanalization, mRS distribution, and favorable outcomes at 3 months (mRS 0–2; CA-O, 36.9%, AT-O, 53.1%; and ICAS-O, 41.3%) did not differ among the three groups. Baseline NIHSS score (odds ratio, 0.87; 95% confidence interval, 0.83 to 0.91) could independently predict a favorable shift in mRS distribution. @*Conclusions@#The functional outcomes of ICAS-O and AT-O were similar to those of CA-O, despite the delay in symptom onset-to-recanalization, suggesting that the therapeutic time window may be extended in these patients.

10.
Neurointervention ; : 27-34, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-741676

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Complete removal of air bubbles from balloons for neurovascular angioplasty is cumbersome. We compared the preparation difficulty, air removal efficiency, and air collection pattern of six different balloon catheter preparation methods to propose a better preparation method for both initial and second balloon uses, especially for small-profile angioplasty balloon catheters. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 18 neurovascular angioplasty balloon catheters with nominal diameters of 2 mm were prepared to test six different preparation methods: the instruction for use method (method A), simplified method using a syringe (method B) and four newly devised preparation methods using inflating devices (methods C–F). Serial radiographs were obtained while the balloons were gradually inflated. We measured the time for each preparation and the bubble number, analyzed their distribution in the balloon, and calculated the contrast filling ratio (contrast filling area/total balloon area) for initial and second ballooning. The whole process was repeated three times. RESULTS: The preparation time varied widely (11.5 seconds [method D] to 73.3 seconds [method A]). On initial inflation, the contrast filling ratio at 8 atm was the highest (100%) with methods A and F. On second inflation, the ratio was again highest with method A (99.5%), followed by method F (99.2%). Initial ballooning tended to show a uniform pattern of single bubble in the distal segment of the balloon; in contrast, second ballooning showed varying patterns in which the bubbles were multiple and randomly distributed. CONCLUSION: None of the six methods were able to completely exclude air bubbles from the balloon catheters including the second ballooning; however, the method of repeating aspiration with high-volume inflating device (method F) could be a practical option considering the simplicity and efficiency of preparation.


Subject(s)
Angioplasty , Angioplasty, Balloon , Catheters , Clothing , Embolism, Air , Equipment Failure , Inflation, Economic , Intracranial Arteriosclerosis , Methods , Syringes
11.
Neurointervention ; : 117-123, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-730256

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Wide-neck aneurysms (WNAs) associated with a dilated parent artery (PA) are not uncommon morphological abnormalities and usually cause inappropriate wall apposition and incomplete neck coverage of a tubular stent in stent-assisted coiling of aneurysms. We aimed to introduce a fusiform-shaped stent (FSS) and test its effectiveness in treating intracranial WNAs associated with a dilated PA using a three-dimensional (3D) model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two FSS types were designed with the middle one-third segment dilated by 10% (FSS10) and 20% (FSS20) and were compared with the tubular-shaped stent (TSS). A patient-specific 3D WNA model was prototyped and produced, and in vitro stent placement was performed. Angiographic images of the three stent types were analyzed and compared using predetermined parameters. RESULTS: The stent lumens were significantly larger in FSS10 and FSS20 than in TSS in the middle segments (P=0.046), particularly FSS20 (P=0.018). The non-covered area at the ostium tended to be smaller in FSS10 and FSS20 than in TSS, but the difference was not significant (P>0.05). The stent length was significantly longer in FSS10 and FSS20 than in TSS. The stent cell size was significantly larger in FSS than in TSS. CONCLUSION: Better vessel wall apposition and aneurysmal neck coverage was observed for FSS than for TSS. No significant difference was observed between FSS10 and FSS20.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Arteries , Cell Size , Endovascular Procedures , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , Intracranial Aneurysm , Neck , Parents , Stents
12.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-787078

ABSTRACT

Peripheral nerve blocks are commonly used for surgical anesthesia, postoperative analgesia, and to reduce opioid requirements. Although these blocks have traditionally been carried out using local anesthetics, single-injection techniques can be short-lived and limited by the relatively brief duration of action of currently available local anesthetics. Increasing the dose or concentration of local anesthetics may prolong the duration of analgesia, but may also increase the risk such as unwanted motor weakness or systemic toxicity of local anesthetics. Numerous adjuvant medications have been added to local anesthetics to prolong the durations of anesthesia and analgesia achieved by peripheral nerve blocks, and currently, a number of different adjuvants are used to improve quality of the block. This article will review the several nerve block adjuvants used in combination with local anesthetics to provide blockade of peripheral nerves in clinical practice, describing the rationale for their use in peripheral nerve blocks, and the evidence for their effectiveness.


Subject(s)
Analgesia , Anesthesia , Anesthesia and Analgesia , Anesthetics, Local , Nerve Block , Peripheral Nerves
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-787051

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A motor blockade of lower limbs interferes with early ambulation and limits the usefulness of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA). The concentration of local anesthetic solution is a major determinant for motor block with PCEA. We compared the effects of epidural infusion of 0.075% ropivacaine with 0.15% epidural ropivacaine on postoperative analgesia, motor block of lower limbs, and other side effects.METHODS: A total of 70 patients undergoing laparoscopic gynecologic surgery received epidural infusions (group R1, 0.15% ropivacaine with fentanyl; group R2, 0.075% ropivacaine with fentanyl). Pain score, motor block, and side effects (hypotension, nausea, vomiting, pruritus, urinary retention, dizziness, and numbness) were measured.RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the demographic profiles between the groups. Pain scores of the group R1 and the group R2 were not significantly different. Motor block was more frequent in the group R1 (0.15% ropivacaine with fentanyl) than in the group R2 (0.075% ropivacaine with fentanyl).CONCLUSION: Lower concentration of ropivacaine (0.075%), when compared with higher concentration of ropivacaine (0.15%), seemed to provide similar analgesia with less motor blockade of the lower limbs for the purpose of PCEA.


Subject(s)
Analgesia , Analgesia, Epidural , Dizziness , Early Ambulation , Female , Fentanyl , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures , Humans , Lower Extremity , Nausea , Pruritus , Urinary Retention , Vomiting
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-174150

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A motor blockade of lower limbs interferes with early ambulation and limits the usefulness of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA). The concentration of local anesthetic solution is a major determinant for motor block with PCEA. We compared the effects of epidural infusion of 0.075% ropivacaine with 0.15% epidural ropivacaine on postoperative analgesia, motor block of lower limbs, and other side effects. METHODS: A total of 70 patients undergoing laparoscopic gynecologic surgery received epidural infusions (group R1, 0.15% ropivacaine with fentanyl; group R2, 0.075% ropivacaine with fentanyl). Pain score, motor block, and side effects (hypotension, nausea, vomiting, pruritus, urinary retention, dizziness, and numbness) were measured. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the demographic profiles between the groups. Pain scores of the group R1 and the group R2 were not significantly different. Motor block was more frequent in the group R1 (0.15% ropivacaine with fentanyl) than in the group R2 (0.075% ropivacaine with fentanyl). CONCLUSION: Lower concentration of ropivacaine (0.075%), when compared with higher concentration of ropivacaine (0.15%), seemed to provide similar analgesia with less motor blockade of the lower limbs for the purpose of PCEA.


Subject(s)
Analgesia , Analgesia, Epidural , Dizziness , Early Ambulation , Female , Fentanyl , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures , Humans , Lower Extremity , Nausea , Pruritus , Urinary Retention , Vomiting
15.
Neurointervention ; : 91-99, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-730359

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To determine the minimum required guiding catheter length for embolization of various intracranial aneurysms in anterior circulation and to analyze the effect of various patient factors on the required catheter length and potential interaction with its stability. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From December 2016 to March 2017, 90 patients with 93 anterior circulation aneurysms were enrolled. Three types of guiding catheters (Envoy, Envoy DA, and Envoy DA XB; Codman Neurovascular, Raynham, MA, USA) were used. We measured the in-the-body length of the catheter and checked the catheter tip location in the carotid artery. We analyzed factors affecting the in-the-body length and stability of the guiding catheter system. RESULTS: The average (±standard deviation) in-the-body length of the catheter was 84.2±5.9 cm. The length was significantly longer in men (89.1±5.6 vs. 82.1±4.6 cm, P<0.001), patients older than 65 years (87.7±7.8 vs. 82.7±4.2 cm, P<0.001), patients with a more tortuous arch (arch type 2 and 3) (87.5±7.4 vs. 82.7±4.4 cm, P<0.001), and patients with a distal aneurysm location (distal group) (86.2±5.0 vs. 82.7±6.1 cm, P=0.004). A shift in the tip location was noted in 19 patients (20.4%); there was no significant different among the 3 catheters (P=0.942). CONCLUSION: The minimum required length of a guiding catheter was 84 cm on average for elective anterior-circulation aneurysm embolization. The length increased in men older than 65 years with a more tortuous arch. We could reach a higher position with distal access catheters with little difference in the stability once we reached the target location.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Carotid Arteries , Catheters , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Male
16.
Neurointervention ; : 3-10, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-730312

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Onyx has been successfully applied in the treatment of various neurovascular lesions. However, some experience is required to get accustomed to its unpredictable fluoroscopic visibility during injection. This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the characteristics of radiopacity change in a simulated embolization procedure. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Using a bench-top Onyx injection experiment simulating a typical brain arteriovenous malformation embolization, nine cycles of casting modes (continuous injection) and plugging modes (injection with intermittent pauses) were performed. Radiodensity of Onyx droplets collected from the microcatheter tip and the distal head portion of the microcatheter were measured as time lapsed. Distribution of droplet radiodensity (radiodensity) and distribution of radiographic grade (grade) were analyzed and compared by repeated measurements. RESULTS: Within-group analysis revealed no significant radiodensity change with time (P>0.05). The radiodensity was significantly higher in the casting mode than in the plugging mode (P<0.01). The lateral radiograph of the microcatheter showed higher radiopacity (P<0.01) and better evenness (P<0.01) in the casting mode than in the plugging mode. A significant difference in microcatheter attenuation (both radiographic grade mean and SD; P<0.01) was noted between the two modes. Radiodensity had a significant influence on the radiopacity and radiopacity evenness of the microcatheter. CONCLUSION: The radiopacity of the Onyx can vary significantly over time because of early precipitation of tantalum powder. Radiopacity decreased significantly during plugging modes, characterized by pauses between injections.


Subject(s)
Arteriovenous Malformations , Brain , Head , In Vitro Techniques , Tantalum
17.
Neurointervention ; : 31-39, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-730309

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To better understand the performance of four commercially available neurovascular stents in intracranial aneurysm embolization, the stents were compared in terms of their basic morphological and mechanical properties. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four different types of stents that are currently being used for cerebral aneurysm embolization were prepared (two stents per type). Two were laser-cut stents (Neuroform and Enterprise) and two were braided from a single nitinol wire (LEO and LVIS stents). All were subjected to quantitative measurements of stent size, pore density, metal coverage, the force needed to load, push, and deploy the stent, radial force on deployment, surface roughness, and corrosion resistance. RESULTS: Compared to their nominal diameters, all stents had greater diameters after deployment. The length generally decreased after deployment. This was particularly marked in the braided stents. The braided stents also had higher pore densities than the laser-cut stents. Metal coverage was highest in the LEO stent (14%) and lowest in the Enterprise stent (5%). The LIVS stent had the highest microcatheter loading force (81.5 gf). The LEO stent had the highest passage force (55.0 gf) and deployment force (78.9 gf). The LVIS and LEO stents had the highest perpendicular (37.1 gf) and circumferential (178.4 gf) radial forces, respectively. The Enterprise stent had the roughest stent wire, followed by the LVIS, LEO, and Neuroform stents. CONCLUSION: The four neurovascular stent types differed in terms of morphological and physical characteristics. An understanding of this diversity may help to decide which stent is most suitable for specific clinical situations.


Subject(s)
Corrosion , Intracranial Aneurysm , Stents
18.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-174355

ABSTRACT

Peripheral nerve blocks are commonly used for surgical anesthesia, postoperative analgesia, and to reduce opioid requirements. Although these blocks have traditionally been carried out using local anesthetics, single-injection techniques can be short-lived and limited by the relatively brief duration of action of currently available local anesthetics. Increasing the dose or concentration of local anesthetics may prolong the duration of analgesia, but may also increase the risk such as unwanted motor weakness or systemic toxicity of local anesthetics. Numerous adjuvant medications have been added to local anesthetics to prolong the durations of anesthesia and analgesia achieved by peripheral nerve blocks, and currently, a number of different adjuvants are used to improve quality of the block. This article will review the several nerve block adjuvants used in combination with local anesthetics to provide blockade of peripheral nerves in clinical practice, describing the rationale for their use in peripheral nerve blocks, and the evidence for their effectiveness.


Subject(s)
Analgesia , Anesthesia , Anesthesia and Analgesia , Anesthetics, Local , Nerve Block , Peripheral Nerves
19.
Journal of Stroke ; : 196-204, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-72818

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Decreasing the time delay for thrombolysis, including intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) with tissue plasminogen activator and intra-arterial thrombectomy (IAT), is critical for decreasing the morbidity and mortality of patients experiencing acute stroke. We aimed to decrease the in-hospital delay for both IVT and IAT through a multidisciplinary approach that is feasible 24 h/day. METHODS: We implemented the Stroke Alert Team (SAT) on May 2, 2016, which introduced hospital-initiated ambulance prenotification and reorganized in-hospital processes. We compared the patient characteristics, time for each step of the evaluation and thrombolysis, thrombolysis rate, and post-thrombolysis intracranial hemorrhage from January 2014 to August 2016. RESULTS: A total of 245 patients received thrombolysis (198 before SAT; 47 after SAT). The median door-to-CT, door-to-MRI, and door-to-laboratory times decreased to 13 min, 37.5 min, and 8 min, respectively, after SAT implementation (P<0.001). The median door-to-IVT time decreased from 46 min (interquartile range [IQR] 36–57 min) to 20.5 min (IQR 15.8–32.5 min; P<0.001). The median door-to-IAT time decreased from 156 min (IQR 124.5–212.5 min) to 86.5 min (IQR 67.5–102.3 min; P<0.001). The thrombolysis rate increased from 9.8% (198/2,012) to 15.8% (47/297; P=0.002), and the post-thrombolysis radiological intracranial hemorrhage rate decreased from 12.6% (25/198) to 2.1% (1/47; P=0.035). CONCLUSIONS: SAT significantly decreased the in-hospital delay for thrombolysis, increased thrombolysis rate, and decreased post-thrombolysis intracranial hemorrhage. Time benefits of SAT were observed for both IVT and IAT and during office hours and after-hours.


Subject(s)
Ambulances , Cerebral Infarction , Humans , Intracranial Hemorrhages , Mortality , Stroke , Thrombectomy , Thrombolytic Therapy , Tissue Plasminogen Activator
20.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-29170

ABSTRACT

Recent improvements have been made to the use of time-resolved, three-dimensional phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is also named four-dimensional (4D) PC-MRI or 4D flow MRI, in the investigation of spatial and temporal variations in hemodynamic features in cardiovascular blood flow. The present article reviews the principle and analytical procedures of 4D PC-MRI. Various fluid dynamic biomarkers for possible clinical usage are also described, including wall shear stress, turbulent kinetic energy, and relative pressure. Lastly, this article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D PC-MRI in various cardiovascular regions.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers , Hemodynamics , Hydrodynamics , Magnetic Resonance Imaging
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