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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-900093

ABSTRACT

Symptomatic cerebral vasospasm (CVS) and delayed ischemic neurologic deficit (DIND) after unruptured aneurysm surgery are extremely rare. Its onset timing is variable, and its mechanisms are unclear. We report two cases of CVS with DIND after unruptured aneurysm surgery and review the literature regarding potential mechanisms. The first case is a 51-year-old woman with non-hemorrhagic vasospasm after unruptured left anterior communicating artery aneurysm surgery. She presented with delayed vasospasm on postoperative day 14. The second case is a 45-year-old woman who suffered from oculomotor nerve palsy caused by an unruptured posterior communicatig artery (PCoA) aneurysm. DIND with non-hemorrhagic vasospasm developed on postoperative day 12. To our knowledge, this is the first report of symptomatic CVS with oculomotor nerve palsy following unruptured PCoA aneurysm surgery. CVS with DIND after unruptured aneurysm surgery is very rare and can be triggered by multiple mechanisms, such as hemorrhage, mechanical stress to the arterial wall, or the trigemino-cerebrovascular system. For unruptured aneurysm surgery, although it is rare, careful observation and treatments can be needed for postoperative CVS with DIND.

2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-892389

ABSTRACT

Symptomatic cerebral vasospasm (CVS) and delayed ischemic neurologic deficit (DIND) after unruptured aneurysm surgery are extremely rare. Its onset timing is variable, and its mechanisms are unclear. We report two cases of CVS with DIND after unruptured aneurysm surgery and review the literature regarding potential mechanisms. The first case is a 51-year-old woman with non-hemorrhagic vasospasm after unruptured left anterior communicating artery aneurysm surgery. She presented with delayed vasospasm on postoperative day 14. The second case is a 45-year-old woman who suffered from oculomotor nerve palsy caused by an unruptured posterior communicatig artery (PCoA) aneurysm. DIND with non-hemorrhagic vasospasm developed on postoperative day 12. To our knowledge, this is the first report of symptomatic CVS with oculomotor nerve palsy following unruptured PCoA aneurysm surgery. CVS with DIND after unruptured aneurysm surgery is very rare and can be triggered by multiple mechanisms, such as hemorrhage, mechanical stress to the arterial wall, or the trigemino-cerebrovascular system. For unruptured aneurysm surgery, although it is rare, careful observation and treatments can be needed for postoperative CVS with DIND.

3.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-834845

ABSTRACT

Endovascular recanalization therapy (ERT) has been a standard of care for patients with acute ischemic stroke due to large artery occlusion (LAO) within 6 hours after onset since the five landmark ERT trials up to 2015 demonstrated its clinical benefit. Recently, two randomized clinical trials demonstrated that ERT, even in the late time window up to 16 hours or 24 hours after last known normal time, improved the outcome of patients who had a target mismatch defined as either clinical-core mismatch or perfusion-core mismatch, which prompted the update of national guidelines in several countries. Accordingly, to provide evidence-based and up-to-date recommendations for ERT in patients with acute LAO in Korea, the Clinical Practice Guidelines Committee of the Korean Stroke Society decided to revise the previous Korean Clinical Practice Guidelines of Stroke for ERT. For this update, the members of the writing group were appointed by the Korean Stroke Society and the Korean Society of Interventional Neuroradiology. After thorough reviewing the updated evidence from two recent trials and relevant literature, the writing members revised recommendations, for which formal consensus was achieved by convening an expert panel composed of 45 experts from the participating academic societies. The current guidelines are intended to help healthcare providers, patients, and their caregivers make their well-informed decisions and to improve the quality of care regarding ERT. The ultimate decision for ERT in a particular patient must be made in light of circumstances specific to that patient.

4.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-833801

ABSTRACT

Human sparganosis is a zoonotic disease caused by infection and migration of the plerocercoid of Spirometra spp. Although sparganosis were reported from most parts of the body, the sparganum parasitizing inside cerebral artery is remarkably uncommon. We report a case of cerebral intravascular sparganosis in an elderly patient with acute ischemic stroke who was diagnosed by retrieving sparganum during mechanical thrombectomy. Finally, the parasites were identified as Spirometra erinaceieuropaei using multiplex PCR and cox1 gene sequencing.

5.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-833468

ABSTRACT

Objective@#: A consensus regarding the ideal regimen for urokinase (UK) thrombolysis subsequent to stereotactic spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage aspiration has yet to be established. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of UK thrombolysis relative to when the regimen is changed. @*Methods@#: Venous blood from 30 heathy volunteers was obtained for this in-vitro study. Various concentrations of UK solution were added to microcentrifuge tubes containing the clotted blood. The efficacy of UK thrombolysis was identified by checking the weight of lysed hematoma following various time intervals with different concentrations of UK solution. Group one, the “3×4” group involved four administrations every 3 hours over 12 hours, and group two, the “6×2” group involved two administrations every 6 hours over 12 hours. @*Results@#: More hematoma was lysed in the 3×4 group than the 6×2 group across all concentration levels (however, the differences were only significant between groups at the 500 and 1000 IU concentration levels, p<0.05). There were no significant differences of lysed hematoma among the various UK solution concentrations within groups. @*Conclusion@#: This study suggests that frequent administrations of UK thrombolysis may result in a greater degree of lysed hematoma in comparison to a higher concentration of UK.

6.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-833418

ABSTRACT

Proximal flow control achieved with a balloon guide catheter (BGC) during endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke is reviewed in this article. In clinical practice, BGCs offer a multi-faceted approach for clot retrieval by creating proximal flow arrest, reducing embolic burden, and shortening procedure time. Evaluation of frontline thrombectomy procedures with BGCs revealed advantages of combined use over the conventional guide catheter (CGC), notably in the significant reduction of distal emboli to both the affected and previously unaffected territories. Recently, new measures of early and complete reperfusion at first thrombectomy pass have been identified as independent predictors of improved outcomes, which were consistently demonstrated with use of BGC as a safe and effective option to minimize number of passes during intervention. Prior randomized controlled trials reported the positive correlation between BGC-treated patients and a lower risk of mortality as well as shortened procedure time. While BGC use is more common in stent retriever-mediated mechanical thrombectomy, preliminary data has shown the potential benefit of device application during contact aspiration thrombectomy to achieve successful recanalization. However, the question of which major endovascular strategy reigns superior as a frontline remains to be answered. Along with clinical case assessments, BGC performance during in-vitro simulation was analyzed to further understand mechanisms for optimization of thrombectomy technique.

7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-765383

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: While the risk of aneurysmal rebleeding induced by catheter cerebral angiography is a serious concern and can delay angiography for a few hours after a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), current angiographic technology and techniques have been much improved. Therefore, this study investigated the risk of aneurysmal rebleeding when using a recent angiographic technique immediately after SAH. METHODS: Patients with acute SAH underwent immediate catheter angiography on admission. A four-vessel examination was conducted using a biplane digital subtraction angiography (DSA) system that applied a low injection rate and small volume of a diluted contrast, along with appropriate control of hypertension. Intra-angiographic aneurysmal rebleeding was diagnosed in cases of extravasation of the contrast medium during angiography or increased intracranial bleeding evident in flat-panel detector computed tomography scans. RESULTS: In-hospital recurrent hemorrhages before definitive treatment to obliterate the ruptured aneurysm occurred in 11 of 266 patients (4.1%). Following a univariate analysis, a multivariate analysis using a logistic regression analysis revealed that modified Fisher grade 4 was a statistically significant risk factor for an in-hospital recurrent hemorrhage (p =0.032). Cerebral angiography after SAH was performed on 88 patients ≤3 hours, 74 patients between 3–6 hours, and 104 patients >6 hours. None of the time intervals showed any cases of intra-angiographic rebleeding. Moreover, even though the DSA ≤3 hours group included more patients with a poor clinical grade and modified Fisher grade 4, no case of aneurysmal rebleeding occurred during erebral angiography. CONCLUSION: Despite the high risk of aneurysmal rebleeding within a few hours after SAH, emergency cerebral angiography after SAH can be acceptable without increasing the risk of intra-angiographic rebleeding when using current angiographic techniques and equipment.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Aneurysm, Ruptured , Angiography , Angiography, Digital Subtraction , Catheters , Cerebral Angiography , Emergencies , Hemorrhage , Humans , Hypertension , Intracranial Aneurysm , Logistic Models , Multivariate Analysis , Risk Factors , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-765360

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We retrospectively assessed the efficacy of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) involving the transverse-sigmoid sinus and analyzed the angiographic and clinical results with our 8-year experience. METHODS: Nine patients with intracranial DAVFs involving the transverse-sigmoid sinus underwent SRS using a Gamma Knife® (Elekta Inc., Atlanta, GA, USA) between 2009 and 2016. Five patients underwent SRS for residual DAVFs after embolization and four patients were treated with SRS alone. The median target volume was 1.9 cm3 (range, 0.8–14.2) and the median radiation dose of the target was 17 Gy (range, 16–20). The median follow-up period was 37 months (range, 7–81). RESULTS: Pulsating tinnitus (33%) was the most common symptom. DAVFs were completely obliterated in four patients (44%) and subtotally obliterated in five (56%). Six patients (67%) showed complete recovery of symptoms or signs, and three (33%) showed incomplete recovery. One patient experienced a recurrent seizure. Adverse radiation effects after SRS occurred in one patient (11%). The total obliteration rates after SRS were 16.7%, 37.5%, and 68.7% at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively. The median interval from SRS to total obliteration of the fistula was 31 months (range, 12–38). The rates at which the symptoms started to improve were 40% at 1 month and 80% at 2 months after SRS. Symptoms started to improve at a median of 5 weeks after SRS (range, 3–21). CONCLUSION: SRS with or without embolization is a safe and effective treatment to relieve symptoms and obliterate DAVFs on the transverse-sigmoid sinus.


Subject(s)
Central Nervous System Vascular Malformations , Fistula , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Radiation Effects , Radiosurgery , Retrospective Studies , Seizures , Tinnitus , Transverse Sinuses
9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-765333

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In patients with internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion, collateral middle cerebral artery (MCA) flow has a protective role against ischemia. However, some of these patients may experience initial major neurological deficits and major worsening on following days. Thus, we investigated the safety and efficacy of endovascular treatment (EVT) for ICA occlusion with collateral MCA flow by comparing clinical outcomes of medical treatment versus EVT. METHODS: The inclusion criteria were as follows : 1) acute ischemic stroke with ICA occlusion and presence of collateral MCA flow on transfemoral cerebral angiography (TFCA) and 2) hospital arrival within 12 hours from symptom onset. The treatment strategy was made by the attending physician based on the patient’s clinical status and results of TFCA. RESULTS: Eighty-one patients were included (30 medical treatment, 51 EVT). The EVT group revealed a high incidence of intracranial ICA occlusion, longer ipsilesional MCA contrast filling time, and a similar rate of favorable clinical outcome despite a higher mean baseline the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score. By binary logistic regression analysis, intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and EVT were independent predictors of favorable clinical outcome. In subgroup analysis based on stroke etiology, the non-atherosclerotic group showed a higher baseline NIHSS score, higher incidence of EVT, and a higher rate of distal embolization during EVT in comparison with the atherosclerotic group. CONCLUSION: In patients with ICA occlusion and collateral MCA flow, decisions regarding treatment strategy based on TFCA can help achieve favorable clinical outcomes. EVT strategy with respect to etiology of ICA occlusion might help achieve better angiographic outcomes.


Subject(s)
Carotid Artery, Internal , Cerebral Angiography , Collateral Circulation , Humans , Incidence , Ischemia , Logistic Models , Middle Cerebral Artery , Stroke , Thrombectomy , Tissue Plasminogen Activator
10.
Journal of Stroke ; : 231-240, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-766240

ABSTRACT

Endovascular recanalization therapy (ERT) has been a standard of care for patients with acute ischemic stroke due to large artery occlusion (LAO) within 6 hours after onset, since five landmark ERT trials conducted by 2015 demonstrated its clinical benefit. Recently, two randomized clinical trials demonstrated that ERT, even in the late time window of up to 16 hours or 24 hours after last known normal time, improved the outcome of patients who had a target mismatch, defined as either clinical-core mismatch or perfusion-core mismatch, which prompted the update of national guidelines in several countries. Accordingly, to provide evidence-based and up-to-date recommendations for ERT in patients with acute LAO in Korea, the Clinical Practice Guidelines Committee of the Korean Stroke Society decided to revise the previous Korean Clinical Practice Guidelines of Stroke for ERT. For this update, the members of the writing group were appointed by the Korean Stroke Society and the Korean Society of Interventional Neuroradiology. After thoroughly reviewing the updated evidence from two recent trials and relevant literature, the writing members revised recommendations, for which formal consensus was achieved by convening an expert panel composed of 45 experts from the participating academic societies. The current guidelines are intended to help healthcare providers, patients, and their caregivers make well-informed decisions and to improve the quality of care regarding ERT. The ultimate decision for ERT in a particular patient must be made in light of circumstances specific to that patient.


Subject(s)
Arteries , Caregivers , Cerebral Infarction , Consensus , Health Personnel , Humans , Korea , Mechanical Thrombolysis , Reperfusion , Standard of Care , Stroke , Writing
11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-741458

ABSTRACT

For recanalization of emergent large vessel occlusions (ELVOs), endovascular therapy (EVT) using newer devices, such as a stent retriever and large-bore catheter, has shown better patient outcomes compared with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator only. Intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS) is a major cause of acute ischemic stroke, the incidence of which is rising worldwide. Thus, it is not rare to encounter underlying ICAS during EVT procedures, particularly in Asian countries. ELVO due to underlying ICAS is often related to EVT procedure failure or complications, which can lead to poor functional recovery. However, information regarding EVT for this type of stroke is lacking because large clinical trials have been largely based on Western populations. In this review, we discuss the unique pathologic basis of ELVO with underlying ICAS, which may complicate EVT procedures. Moreover, we review EVT data for patients with ELVO due to underlying ICAS and suggest an optimal endovascular recanalization strategy based on the existing literature. Finally, we present future perspectives on this subject.


Subject(s)
Angioplasty , Asian Continental Ancestry Group , Atherosclerosis , Catheters , Cerebral Infarction , Constriction, Pathologic , Humans , Incidence , Stents , Stroke , Thrombectomy , Tissue Plasminogen Activator
12.
Neurointervention ; : 71-81, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-760600

ABSTRACT

Endovascular recanalization therapy (ERT) has been a standard of care for patients with acute ischemic stroke due to large artery occlusion (LAO) within 6 hours after onset, since five landmark ERT trials conducted by 2015 demonstrated its clinical benefit. Recently, two randomized clinical trials demonstrated that ERT, even in the late time window of up to 16 hours or 24 hours after last known normal time, improved the outcome of patients who had a target mismatch, defined as either clinical-core mismatch or perfusion-core mismatch, which prompted the update of national guidelines in several countries. Accordingly, to provide evidence-based and up-to-date recommendations for ERT in patients with acute LAO in Korea, the Clinical Practice Guidelines Committee of the Korean Stroke Society decided to revise the previous Korean Clinical Practice Guidelines of Stroke for ERT. For this update, the members of the writing group were appointed by the Korean Stroke Society and the Korean Society of Interventional Neuroradiology. After thoroughly reviewing the updated evidence from two recent trials and relevant literature, the writing members revised recommendations, for which formal consensus was achieved by convening an expert panel composed of 45 experts from the participating academic societies. The current guidelines are intended to help healthcare providers, patients, and their caregivers make well-informed decisions and to improve the quality of care regarding ERT. The ultimate decision for ERT in a particular patient must be made in light of circumstances specific to that patient.


Subject(s)
Arteries , Caregivers , Cerebral Infarction , Consensus , Health Personnel , Humans , Korea , Mechanical Thrombolysis , Reperfusion , Standard of Care , Stroke , Writing
13.
Neurointervention ; : 107-115, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-760596

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Emergent intracranial occlusions causing acute ischemic stroke are often related to extracranial atherosclerotic stenosis. This study aimed to investigate the association between post-procedure intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and emergent extracranial artery stenting and assess their effects on clinical outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed patients undergoing hyperacute endovascular treatment for cervicocephalic vascular occlusion in three Korean hospitals between January 2011 and February 2016. Patients who had extracranial artery involvement and were treated from 24 hours of symptom onset to puncture were included in this study, and they were divided into the extracranial stenting (ES) and non-ES groups. Any type of petechial hemorrhages and parenchymal hematoma was defined as ICH for the current study. RESULTS: In total, 76 patients were included in this study. Among them, 56 patients underwent ES, and 20 patients did not. Baseline characteristics, risk factors, laboratory data, treatment methods, successful reperfusion rates, and baseline stenotic degrees of extracranial internal carotid artery did not differ between these two groups. However, atrial fibrillation was more frequent in patients without than with ES (P=0.002), and post-procedure ICH was more frequent in patients with than without ES (P=0.035). Logistic regression models revealed that ES was independently associated with post-procedure ICH (odds ratio [OR], 7.807; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.213–50.248; P=0.031), and ICH was independently associated with poor clinical outcomes (OR, 0.202; 95% CI, 0.054–0.759; P=0.018); however, ES itself was not associated with clinical outcomes (OR, 0.530; 95% CI, 0.117–2.395; P=0.409). Notably, ICH and ES had interaction for predicting good outcomes (P=0.041). CONCLUSION: Post-procedure ICH was associated with ES and poor clinical outcomes. Therefore, ES should be cautiously considered in patients with hyperacute stroke.


Subject(s)
Arteries , Atrial Fibrillation , Carotid Artery, Internal , Carotid Stenosis , Cerebral Hemorrhage , Cerebral Infarction , Constriction, Pathologic , Endovascular Procedures , Hematoma , Hemorrhage , Humans , Logistic Models , Punctures , Reperfusion , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Stents , Stroke
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-788810

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: While the risk of aneurysmal rebleeding induced by catheter cerebral angiography is a serious concern and can delay angiography for a few hours after a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), current angiographic technology and techniques have been much improved. Therefore, this study investigated the risk of aneurysmal rebleeding when using a recent angiographic technique immediately after SAH.METHODS: Patients with acute SAH underwent immediate catheter angiography on admission. A four-vessel examination was conducted using a biplane digital subtraction angiography (DSA) system that applied a low injection rate and small volume of a diluted contrast, along with appropriate control of hypertension. Intra-angiographic aneurysmal rebleeding was diagnosed in cases of extravasation of the contrast medium during angiography or increased intracranial bleeding evident in flat-panel detector computed tomography scans.RESULTS: In-hospital recurrent hemorrhages before definitive treatment to obliterate the ruptured aneurysm occurred in 11 of 266 patients (4.1%). Following a univariate analysis, a multivariate analysis using a logistic regression analysis revealed that modified Fisher grade 4 was a statistically significant risk factor for an in-hospital recurrent hemorrhage (p =0.032). Cerebral angiography after SAH was performed on 88 patients ≤3 hours, 74 patients between 3–6 hours, and 104 patients >6 hours. None of the time intervals showed any cases of intra-angiographic rebleeding. Moreover, even though the DSA ≤3 hours group included more patients with a poor clinical grade and modified Fisher grade 4, no case of aneurysmal rebleeding occurred during erebral angiography.CONCLUSION: Despite the high risk of aneurysmal rebleeding within a few hours after SAH, emergency cerebral angiography after SAH can be acceptable without increasing the risk of intra-angiographic rebleeding when using current angiographic techniques and equipment.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Aneurysm, Ruptured , Angiography , Angiography, Digital Subtraction , Catheters , Cerebral Angiography , Emergencies , Hemorrhage , Humans , Hypertension , Intracranial Aneurysm , Logistic Models , Multivariate Analysis , Risk Factors , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-788787

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We retrospectively assessed the efficacy of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) involving the transverse-sigmoid sinus and analyzed the angiographic and clinical results with our 8-year experience.METHODS: Nine patients with intracranial DAVFs involving the transverse-sigmoid sinus underwent SRS using a Gamma Knife® (Elekta Inc., Atlanta, GA, USA) between 2009 and 2016. Five patients underwent SRS for residual DAVFs after embolization and four patients were treated with SRS alone. The median target volume was 1.9 cm3 (range, 0.8–14.2) and the median radiation dose of the target was 17 Gy (range, 16–20). The median follow-up period was 37 months (range, 7–81).RESULTS: Pulsating tinnitus (33%) was the most common symptom. DAVFs were completely obliterated in four patients (44%) and subtotally obliterated in five (56%). Six patients (67%) showed complete recovery of symptoms or signs, and three (33%) showed incomplete recovery. One patient experienced a recurrent seizure. Adverse radiation effects after SRS occurred in one patient (11%). The total obliteration rates after SRS were 16.7%, 37.5%, and 68.7% at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively. The median interval from SRS to total obliteration of the fistula was 31 months (range, 12–38). The rates at which the symptoms started to improve were 40% at 1 month and 80% at 2 months after SRS. Symptoms started to improve at a median of 5 weeks after SRS (range, 3–21).CONCLUSION: SRS with or without embolization is a safe and effective treatment to relieve symptoms and obliterate DAVFs on the transverse-sigmoid sinus.


Subject(s)
Central Nervous System Vascular Malformations , Fistula , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Radiation Effects , Radiosurgery , Retrospective Studies , Seizures , Tinnitus , Transverse Sinuses
16.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-788762

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In patients with internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion, collateral middle cerebral artery (MCA) flow has a protective role against ischemia. However, some of these patients may experience initial major neurological deficits and major worsening on following days. Thus, we investigated the safety and efficacy of endovascular treatment (EVT) for ICA occlusion with collateral MCA flow by comparing clinical outcomes of medical treatment versus EVT.METHODS: The inclusion criteria were as follows : 1) acute ischemic stroke with ICA occlusion and presence of collateral MCA flow on transfemoral cerebral angiography (TFCA) and 2) hospital arrival within 12 hours from symptom onset. The treatment strategy was made by the attending physician based on the patient’s clinical status and results of TFCA.RESULTS: Eighty-one patients were included (30 medical treatment, 51 EVT). The EVT group revealed a high incidence of intracranial ICA occlusion, longer ipsilesional MCA contrast filling time, and a similar rate of favorable clinical outcome despite a higher mean baseline the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score. By binary logistic regression analysis, intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and EVT were independent predictors of favorable clinical outcome. In subgroup analysis based on stroke etiology, the non-atherosclerotic group showed a higher baseline NIHSS score, higher incidence of EVT, and a higher rate of distal embolization during EVT in comparison with the atherosclerotic group.CONCLUSION: In patients with ICA occlusion and collateral MCA flow, decisions regarding treatment strategy based on TFCA can help achieve favorable clinical outcomes. EVT strategy with respect to etiology of ICA occlusion might help achieve better angiographic outcomes.


Subject(s)
Carotid Artery, Internal , Cerebral Angiography , Collateral Circulation , Humans , Incidence , Ischemia , Logistic Models , Middle Cerebral Artery , Stroke , Thrombectomy , Tissue Plasminogen Activator
17.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-766634

ABSTRACT

Multiple large-vessel occlusive stroke is rare in clinical practice, and its prognosis is usually poor. A 58-year-old female with atrial fibrillation experienced left hemiparesis and drowsy mentality, and was diagnosed with ischemic stroke due to acute occlusion of right carotid and basilar artery. Successful mechanical thrombectomy was performed for both occlusions with clot aspiration technique, and favorable outcome was achieved at 3-month. Endovascular revascularization therapy in acute occlusion of multiple large vessels seems feasible when favorable outcome can be expected.


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation , Basilar Artery , Carotid Artery, Internal , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Paresis , Prognosis , Stroke , Thrombectomy
18.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-718969

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To compare the clinical outcomes of ultrasound-guided percutaneous repair (USPR) and open repair in a ruptured Achilles tendon. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The outcomes of 12 patients with USPR (group A) and 18 patients with open repair (group B) from January 2015 to February 2017 were analyzed retrospectively. The postoperative clinical evaluations were performed using the Arner-Lindholm scale, American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score, Achilles tendon total rupture score (ATRS), and visual analogue scale for the overall satisfaction and cosmetic satisfaction with the scar, and the starting time of single heel raises. The complications were also evaluated. RESULTS: The Arner-Lindholm scale, AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score, ATRS, starting time of single heel raises were similar in both groups (all p>0.05). Group A showed a significantly higher overall patient's satisfaction and cosmetic satisfaction in than group B (all p < 0.05). Two cases of Achilles tendon elongation were encountered in group A, and 1 case of re-rupture with deep infection and 1 case of superficial infection were experienced in group B. CONCLUSION: USPR showed good clinical outcomes and high satisfaction as well as a low rate of complications, such as sural nerve injury. Therefore, USPR can be considered as an effective surgical treatment option for Achilles tendon ruptures.


Subject(s)
Achilles Tendon , Ankle , Cicatrix , Foot , Heel , Humans , Orthopedics , Retrospective Studies , Rupture , Sural Nerve , Ultrasonography
19.
Journal of Stroke ; : 394-403, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-717266

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Little is known about prognosis after endovascular therapy (EVT) for acute large artery occlusion (LAO) caused by underlying intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS). Therefore, we investigated the prognosis following EVT according to the underlying etiology of LAO. METHODS: Patients from the Acute Stroke due to Intracranial Atherosclerotic occlusion and Neurointervention-Korean Retrospective (ASIAN KR) registry (n=720) were included if their occlusion was in the intracranial anterior circulation and their onset-to-puncture time was < 24 hours. Occlusion was classified according to etiology as follows: no significant stenosis after recanalization (Embolic group), and fixed significant focal stenosis in the occlusion site with flow impairment or re-occlusion observed during EVT (ICAS group). Patients were excluded when significant extracranial carotid lesions existed, and when the intracranial occlusion was intractable to EVT so that the etiology was undetermined. The effect of angiographic etiologic classification on outcomes was evaluated using multivariable analysis that was adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Among eligible patients (n=520), 421 and 99 were classified in the Embolic and ICAS groups, respectively. Patients in the Embolic and ICAS groups had similar successful reperfusion rates with EVT (79.6% vs. 76.8%, P=0.537) and 3-month functional independence (54.5% vs. 45.5%, P=0.104). In multivariable analysis, ICAS-related occlusion (odds ratio, 0.495; 95% confidence interval, 0.269 to 0.913; P=0.024) showed poorer 3-month functional independence compared to embolic occlusion. CONCLUSIONS: After EVT, patients with acute ICAS-related occlusion have relatively poor functional outcomes compared to those with embolic occlusion. Novel strategies need to be developed to improve EVT outcomes for ICAS occlusion.


Subject(s)
Arteries , Atherosclerosis , Cerebral Infarction , Classification , Constriction, Pathologic , Embolism , Humans , Prognosis , Reperfusion , Retrospective Studies , Stroke , Thrombectomy , Treatment Outcome
20.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-740148

ABSTRACT

A 66-year-old woman was referred for treatment of incidental detection of two intracranial aneurysms. Time-of-flight MR angiography (TOF MRA) revealed two aneurysms at the M1 segment of the right middle cerebral artery, and clinoid segment of left internal carotid artery, respectively. On digital subtraction angiography, there was a saccular aneurysm on the left internal carotid artery, but the other aneurysm was not detected on the right middle cerebral artery. Based on comprehensive review of imaging findings, organized thrombosed aneurysm was judged as the most likely diagnosis. In the presented report, magnetization transfer (MT) pulse to TOF MRA was used, to differentiate aneurysm-mimicking lesion on TOF MRA. We report that MT technique could be effective in differentiating true aneurysm, from possible T1 high signal artifact on TOF MRA.


Subject(s)
Aged , Aneurysm , Angiography , Angiography, Digital Subtraction , Artifacts , Carotid Artery, Internal , Diagnosis , Female , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Middle Cerebral Artery
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