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1.
Journal of Acute Care Surgery ; (2): 35-38, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-967030

ABSTRACT

Few studies have reported injuries caused by a blank cartridge shot (BCS) into the head and neck. We experienced a case of minor injury resulting from BCS (despite the close proximity). The patient was a 20-year-old male soldier who attempted suicide by firing a BCS from a K2 rifle into his mouth. He suffered from skin and soft tissue defect in the submandibular area with burns and minimal bleeding. A computed tomography scan showed subcutaneous emphysema which was suspected to be related to the projectile gas released during the firing of the BCS, and a tiny fragment without hematoma or structure injuries. We closely observed the clinical features including the occurrence of infection and functional abnormalities. The subcutaneous emphysema faded away along with the soft tissue defect. After wound management was completed on the 13th hospital day, the patient was transferred to the Department of Psychiatry without any problems.

2.
Korean Journal of Clinical Oncology ; (2): 27-35, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-938471

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Various clinical practice guidelines recommend at least 12 regional lymph nodes should be removed for resected colon cancer. According to a recent study, the lymph node yield (LNY) in colon cancer surgery in the last 20 years has tended to increase from 14.91 to 21.30. However, it is unclear whether these guidelines adequately reflect recent findings on the number of harvested lymph nodes in colon cancer surgery. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of an LNY of more than 25 on survival in right-sided colon cancer. @*Methods@#We included 285 patients who underwent a right hemicolectomy during the period from January 2010 through December 2015. Patients were divided into two groups (<25 nodes and ≥25 nodes). Primary endpoints included 5-year and 10-year survival including disease-free and overall. @*Results@#We found that survival outcomes of patients with a harvest of ≥25 nodes were not significantly different compared with a <25 group. Large tumor size (5 cm) is significantly associated with poor 5-year and 10-year overall survival. @*Conclusion@#Survival outcomes of patients with a harvest of ≥25 nodes were not significantly different compared with the <25 group in stage II colon cancer with no risk.

3.
The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology ; : 267-272, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-968682

ABSTRACT

The abscess is a common complication of Crohn’s disease (CD), with the perianal form more frequent than gluteal or presacral which is relatively rare. There are few case reports of gluteal abscess combined with presacral abscess caused by CD and the treatment has not been established. A 21-year-old male was admitted with right buttock and lower back pain with a duration of 3 months. He had a history of CD in the small intestine diagnosed 10 months previously. He had poor compliance and had not returned for follow-up care during the previous 6 months. Abdominopelvic CT indicated newly developed multiple abscess pockets in right gluteal region, including piriformis muscle and presacral space. Additionally, fistula tracts between small bowel loops and presacral space were observed. Patient’s CD was moderate activity (273.12 on the Crohn’s Disease Activity Index [CDAI]). Treatment was started with piperacillin/tazobactam antibiotic but patient developed a fever and abscess extent was aggravated. Therefore, surgical incision and drainage was performed and 4 Penrose drains were inserted. Patient’s pain and fever were resolved following surgery. Infliximab was then administered for the remaining fistulas. After the induction regimen, multiple fistula tracts improved and patient went into remission (CDAI was -0.12).

4.
Annals of Coloproctology ; : 155-162, 2020.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-830395

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Choosing the appropriate antibiotic is important for treatment of complicated appendicitis. However, increasing multidrug resistant bacteria have been a serious problem for successful treatment. This study was designed to identify bacteria isolated from patients with complicated appendicitis and reveal their susceptibilities for antibiotics and their relationship with patient clinical course. @*Methods@#This study included patients diagnosed with complicated appendicitis and examined the bacterial cultures and antimicrobial susceptibilities of the isolates. Data were retrospectively collected from medical records of Kangbuk Samsung Hospital from January 2008 to February 2018. @*Results@#The common bacterial species cultured in complicated appendicitis were as follows: Escherichia coli (n=113, 48.9%), Streptococcus spp. (n=29, 12.6%), Pseudomonas spp. (n=23, 10.0%), Bacteriodes spp. (n=22, 9.5%), Klebsiella (n=11, 4.8%), and Enterococcus spp. (n=8, 3.5%). In antibiotics susceptibility testing, the positive rate of extended-spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) was 9.1% (21 of 231). The resistance rate to carbapenem was 1.7% (4 of 231), while that to vancomycin was 0.4% (1 of 231). E. coli was 16.8% ESBL positive (19 of 113) and had 22.1% and 19.5% resistance rates to cefotaxime and ceftazidime, respectively. Inappropriate empirical antibiotic treatment (IEAT) occurred in 55 cases (31.8%) and was significantly related with organ/space surgical site infection (SSI) (7 of 55, P=0.005). @*Conclusion@#The rate of antibiotic resistance organisms was high in community-acquired complicated appendicitis in Koreans. Additionally, IEAT in complicated appendicitis may lead to increased rates of SSI. Routine intraoperative culture in patients with complicated appendicitis may be an effective strategy for appropriate antibiotic regimen.

5.
Annals of Coloproctology ; : 129-136, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762308

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Inadequate bowel preparation (IBP) is commonly observed during surveillance colonoscopy after colorectal resection. We investigated potential risk factors affecting bowel preparation. METHODS: We studied potential factors affecting bowel preparation quality. The Boston bowel preparation score was used to measure bowel preparation quality. Factors affecting IBP were analyzed, including age, body mass index, time elapsed between surgery and colonoscopy, and amount of bowel preparation drug consumed (conventional-volume vs. low-volume). Odds ratios were calculated for IBP. RESULTS: This retrospective cohort study included 1,317 patients who underwent colorectal resection due to malignancy. Of these patients, 79% had adequate bowel preparation and 21% had IBP. In multivariate regression analysis, a surveillance colonoscopy within 1 year after surgery and age >80 were used as independent predictors of IBP. IBP rate of the low-volume group was significantly higher than that of the conventional-volume group among patients who underwent a surveillance colonoscopy within 1 year after surgery. CONCLUSION: For surveillance colonoscopy after colorectal resection, bowel preparation is affected by factors including colonoscopy timing after surgery and age. We recommend the use of conventional-volume 4-L polyethylene glycol solution when performing a surveillance colonoscopy, especially up to 1 year after surgery.


Subject(s)
Humans , Body Mass Index , Cohort Studies , Colonic Neoplasms , Colonoscopy , Odds Ratio , Polyethylene Glycols , Rectal Neoplasms , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
6.
Journal of Minimally Invasive Surgery ; : 143-149, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-152593

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Laparoscopic surgery is accepted as a standard alternative to open procedures in the management of both benign and malignant colorectal disease. However, the safety and efficacy of the laparoscopic approach for emergency colorectal surgery has not been established. Hand-assisted laparoscopic (HAL) surgery might be a suitable option for colectomy in an emergency setting. The aim of this study was to report our experience of emergency HAL colectomy. METHODS: This was a retrospective review of consecutive colorectal emergency cases that were treated using HAL colectomy. Patient demographics, indications for surgery, operative details, and postoperative complications were examined. RESULTS: From March 2015 to April 2016, 18 patients underwent emergency HAL colectomy for complicated colorectal disease. Eight patients (44%) had an obstruction that required intraoperative decompression procedure. Sixteen patients (89%) had a perforation (five of which were sealed perforations involving large abscesses and inflammatory changes). Eight patients underwent sigmoidectomy, four underwent anterior resection, one underwent low anterior resection, two underwent left hemicolectomy, and three underwent Hartmann's procedure. There were two instances of open conversion (11%). The median duration of surgery was 178 minutes. The median time to bowel function recovery and median postoperative stay were 3 days and 10 days, respectively. The postoperative complication rate associated with the operation was 33% (6/18). There was one postoperative mortality. CONCLUSION: For the experienced surgeon, HAL can be a reasonable option for emergency colorectal surgery.


Subject(s)
Humans , Abscess , Colectomy , Colorectal Surgery , Decompression , Demography , Emergencies , Hand-Assisted Laparoscopy , Laparoscopy , Mortality , Postoperative Complications , Recovery of Function , Retrospective Studies
7.
Annals of Coloproctology ; : 215-220, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-225107

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study compared a subtotal colectomy to self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) insertion as a bridge to surgery for patients with left colon-cancer obstruction. METHODS: Ninety-four consecutive patients with left colon-cancer obstruction underwent an emergency subtotal colectomy or elective SEMS insertion between January 2007 and August 2014. Using prospectively collected data, we performed a retrospective comparative analysis on an intention-to-treat basis. RESULTS: A subtotal colectomy and SEMS insertion were attempted in 24 and 70 patients, respectively. SEMS insertion technically failed in 5 patients (7.1%). The mean age and rate of obstruction in the descending colon were higher in the subtotal colectomy group than the SEMS group. Sex, underlying disease, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status, and pathological stage showed no statistical difference. Laparoscopic surgery was performed more frequently in patients in the SEMS group (62 of 70, 88.6%) than in patients in the subtotal colectomy group (4 of 24, 16.7%). The overall rate of postoperative morbidity was higher in the SEMS group. No Clavien-Dindo grade III or IV complications occurred in the subtotal colectomy group, but 2 patients (2.9%) died from septic complications in the SEMS group. One patient (4.2%) in the subtotal colectomy group had synchronous cancer. The total hospital stay was shorter in the subtotal colectomy group. The median number of bowel movements in the subtotal colectomy group was twice per day at postoperative 3–6 months. CONCLUSION: A subtotal colectomy for patients with obstructive left-colon cancer is a clinically and oncologically safer, 1-stage, surgical strategy compared to SEMS insertion as a bridge to surgery.


Subject(s)
Humans , Colectomy , Colon , Colon, Descending , Colonic Neoplasms , Emergencies , Intestinal Obstruction , Laparoscopy , Length of Stay , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , Stents
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