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1.
Protein & Cell ; (12): 695-716, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-888726

ABSTRACT

The hippocampus plays a crucial role in learning and memory, and its progressive deterioration with age is functionally linked to a variety of human neurodegenerative diseases. Yet a systematic profiling of the aging effects on various hippocampal cell types in primates is still missing. Here, we reported a variety of new aging-associated phenotypic changes of the primate hippocampus. These include, in particular, increased DNA damage and heterochromatin erosion with time, alongside loss of proteostasis and elevated inflammation. To understand their cellular and molecular causes, we established the first single-nucleus transcriptomic atlas of primate hippocampal aging. Among the 12 identified cell types, neural transiently amplifying progenitor cell (TAPC) and microglia were most affected by aging. In-depth dissection of gene-expression dynamics revealed impaired TAPC division and compromised neuronal function along the neurogenesis trajectory; additionally elevated pro-inflammatory responses in the aged microglia and oligodendrocyte, as well as dysregulated coagulation pathways in the aged endothelial cells may contribute to a hostile microenvironment for neurogenesis. This rich resource for understanding primate hippocampal aging may provide potential diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic interventions against age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

2.
International Eye Science ; (12): 1520-1523, 2021.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-886427

ABSTRACT

@#AIM: To establish three-dimensional(3D)model of rat retinal angiogenesis <i>in</i> <i>vitro</i> based on retinal microvascular endothelial cells(ECs)and retinal microvascular pericytes(RMPs). <p>METHODS: The identified ECs and RMPs of third generation to seventh generation were used for research after isolated, purified and cultured. The cells were stained with cell tracer. Then, it were mixed and inoculated on Matrigel by the surface culture method for dynamic observation. The expression of VEGF-A was assessed during angiogenesis. <p>RESULTS: At 12h of co-culture, RMPs were recruited by ECs and gathered into cell masses with different sizes. At 24h, ECs/RMPs formed a complex 3D vascular spline network. At 48h, the reticular structure disintegrated obviously, and only a small amount of incomplete and simple reticular structure remained. At 72h, the vascular spline cable network disintegrated completely. In the development of 3D model, the expression of VEGF-A increased, but decreased when it degenerated. <p>CONCLUSION: This study successfully established a 3D model of rat retinal angiogenesis <i>in</i> <i>vitro</i> based on ECs and RMPs.

3.
Protein & Cell ; (12): 483-504, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-828752

ABSTRACT

SIRT7, a sirtuin family member implicated in aging and disease, is a regulator of metabolism and stress responses. It remains elusive how human somatic stem cell populations might be impacted by SIRT7. Here, we found that SIRT7 expression declines during human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) aging and that SIRT7 deficiency accelerates senescence. Mechanistically, SIRT7 forms a complex with nuclear lamina proteins and heterochromatin proteins, thus maintaining the repressive state of heterochromatin at nuclear periphery. Accordingly, deficiency of SIRT7 results in loss of heterochromatin, de-repression of the LINE1 retrotransposon (LINE1), and activation of innate immune signaling via the cGAS-STING pathway. These aging-associated cellular defects were reversed by overexpression of heterochromatin proteins or treatment with a LINE1 targeted reverse-transcriptase inhibitor. Together, these findings highlight how SIRT7 safeguards chromatin architecture to control innate immune regulation and ensure geroprotection during stem cell aging.

4.
Protein & Cell ; (12): 740-770, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-828746

ABSTRACT

Age-associated changes in immune cells have been linked to an increased risk for infection. However, a global and detailed characterization of the changes that human circulating immune cells undergo with age is lacking. Here, we combined scRNA-seq, mass cytometry and scATAC-seq to compare immune cell types in peripheral blood collected from young and old subjects and patients with COVID-19. We found that the immune cell landscape was reprogrammed with age and was characterized by T cell polarization from naive and memory cells to effector, cytotoxic, exhausted and regulatory cells, along with increased late natural killer cells, age-associated B cells, inflammatory monocytes and age-associated dendritic cells. In addition, the expression of genes, which were implicated in coronavirus susceptibility, was upregulated in a cell subtype-specific manner with age. Notably, COVID-19 promoted age-induced immune cell polarization and gene expression related to inflammation and cellular senescence. Therefore, these findings suggest that a dysregulated immune system and increased gene expression associated with SARS-CoV-2 susceptibility may at least partially account for COVID-19 vulnerability in the elderly.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aging , Genetics , Allergy and Immunology , Betacoronavirus , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes , Metabolism , Cell Lineage , Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly , Coronavirus Infections , Allergy and Immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Allergy and Immunology , Cytokines , Genetics , Disease Susceptibility , Flow Cytometry , Methods , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental , Gene Rearrangement , Humans , Immune System , Cell Biology , Allergy and Immunology , Immunocompetence , Genetics , Inflammation , Genetics , Allergy and Immunology , Mass Spectrometry , Methods , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Allergy and Immunology , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Single-Cell Analysis , Transcriptome , Young Adult
5.
Protein & Cell ; (12): 483-504, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-828588

ABSTRACT

SIRT7, a sirtuin family member implicated in aging and disease, is a regulator of metabolism and stress responses. It remains elusive how human somatic stem cell populations might be impacted by SIRT7. Here, we found that SIRT7 expression declines during human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) aging and that SIRT7 deficiency accelerates senescence. Mechanistically, SIRT7 forms a complex with nuclear lamina proteins and heterochromatin proteins, thus maintaining the repressive state of heterochromatin at nuclear periphery. Accordingly, deficiency of SIRT7 results in loss of heterochromatin, de-repression of the LINE1 retrotransposon (LINE1), and activation of innate immune signaling via the cGAS-STING pathway. These aging-associated cellular defects were reversed by overexpression of heterochromatin proteins or treatment with a LINE1 targeted reverse-transcriptase inhibitor. Together, these findings highlight how SIRT7 safeguards chromatin architecture to control innate immune regulation and ensure geroprotection during stem cell aging.

6.
Protein & Cell ; (12): 740-770, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-828582

ABSTRACT

Age-associated changes in immune cells have been linked to an increased risk for infection. However, a global and detailed characterization of the changes that human circulating immune cells undergo with age is lacking. Here, we combined scRNA-seq, mass cytometry and scATAC-seq to compare immune cell types in peripheral blood collected from young and old subjects and patients with COVID-19. We found that the immune cell landscape was reprogrammed with age and was characterized by T cell polarization from naive and memory cells to effector, cytotoxic, exhausted and regulatory cells, along with increased late natural killer cells, age-associated B cells, inflammatory monocytes and age-associated dendritic cells. In addition, the expression of genes, which were implicated in coronavirus susceptibility, was upregulated in a cell subtype-specific manner with age. Notably, COVID-19 promoted age-induced immune cell polarization and gene expression related to inflammation and cellular senescence. Therefore, these findings suggest that a dysregulated immune system and increased gene expression associated with SARS-CoV-2 susceptibility may at least partially account for COVID-19 vulnerability in the elderly.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aging , Genetics , Allergy and Immunology , Betacoronavirus , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes , Metabolism , Cell Lineage , Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly , Coronavirus Infections , Allergy and Immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Allergy and Immunology , Cytokines , Genetics , Disease Susceptibility , Flow Cytometry , Methods , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental , Gene Rearrangement , Humans , Immune System , Cell Biology , Allergy and Immunology , Immunocompetence , Genetics , Inflammation , Genetics , Allergy and Immunology , Mass Spectrometry , Methods , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Allergy and Immunology , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Single-Cell Analysis , Transcriptome , Young Adult
7.
Protein & Cell ; (12): 809-824, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-880897

ABSTRACT

Many human genetic diseases, including Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), are caused by single point mutations. HGPS is a rare disorder that causes premature aging and is usually caused by a de novo point mutation in the LMNA gene. Base editors (BEs) composed of a cytidine deaminase fused to CRISPR/Cas9 nickase are highly efficient at inducing C to T base conversions in a programmable manner and can be used to generate animal disease models with single amino-acid substitutions. Here, we generated the first HGPS monkey model by delivering a BE mRNA and guide RNA (gRNA) targeting the LMNA gene via microinjection into monkey zygotes. Five out of six newborn monkeys carried the mutation specifically at the target site. HGPS monkeys expressed the toxic form of lamin A, progerin, and recapitulated the typical HGPS phenotypes including growth retardation, bone alterations, and vascular abnormalities. Thus, this monkey model genetically and clinically mimics HGPS in humans, demonstrating that the BE system can efficiently and accurately generate patient-specific disease models in non-human primates.


Subject(s)
Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Gene Editing , Humans , Lamin Type A/metabolism , Macaca fascicularis , Progeria/pathology
8.
Protein & Cell ; (12): 740-770, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-827016

ABSTRACT

Age-associated changes in immune cells have been linked to an increased risk for infection. However, a global and detailed characterization of the changes that human circulating immune cells undergo with age is lacking. Here, we combined scRNA-seq, mass cytometry and scATAC-seq to compare immune cell types in peripheral blood collected from young and old subjects and patients with COVID-19. We found that the immune cell landscape was reprogrammed with age and was characterized by T cell polarization from naive and memory cells to effector, cytotoxic, exhausted and regulatory cells, along with increased late natural killer cells, age-associated B cells, inflammatory monocytes and age-associated dendritic cells. In addition, the expression of genes, which were implicated in coronavirus susceptibility, was upregulated in a cell subtype-specific manner with age. Notably, COVID-19 promoted age-induced immune cell polarization and gene expression related to inflammation and cellular senescence. Therefore, these findings suggest that a dysregulated immune system and increased gene expression associated with SARS-CoV-2 susceptibility may at least partially account for COVID-19 vulnerability in the elderly.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aging , Genetics , Allergy and Immunology , Betacoronavirus , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes , Metabolism , Cell Lineage , Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly , Coronavirus Infections , Allergy and Immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Allergy and Immunology , Cytokines , Genetics , Disease Susceptibility , Flow Cytometry , Methods , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental , Gene Rearrangement , Humans , Immune System , Cell Biology , Allergy and Immunology , Immunocompetence , Genetics , Inflammation , Genetics , Allergy and Immunology , Mass Spectrometry , Methods , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Allergy and Immunology , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Single-Cell Analysis , Transcriptome , Young Adult
9.
Protein & Cell ; (12): 417-435, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-757930

ABSTRACT

Aging increases the risk of various diseases. The main goal of aging research is to find therapies that attenuate aging and alleviate aging-related diseases. In this study, we screened a natural product library for geroprotective compounds using Werner syndrome (WS) human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), a premature aging model that we recently established. Ten candidate compounds were identified and quercetin was investigated in detail due to its leading effects. Mechanistic studies revealed that quercetin alleviated senescence via the enhancement of cell proliferation and restoration of heterochromatin architecture in WS hMSCs. RNA-sequencing analysis revealed the transcriptional commonalities and differences in the geroprotective effects by quercetin and Vitamin C. Besides WS hMSCs, quercetin also attenuated cellular senescence in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) and physiological-aging hMSCs. Taken together, our study identifies quercetin as a geroprotective agent against accelerated and natural aging in hMSCs, providing a potential therapeutic intervention for treating age-associated disorders.

10.
Protein & Cell ; (12): 249-271, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-757893

ABSTRACT

Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a rare hereditary cerebrovascular disease caused by a NOTCH3 mutation. However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain unidentified. Here, we generated non-integrative induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts of a CADASIL patient harboring a heterozygous NOTCH3 mutation (c.3226C>T, p.R1076C). Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) differentiated from CADASIL-specific iPSCs showed gene expression changes associated with disease phenotypes, including activation of the NOTCH and NF-κB signaling pathway, cytoskeleton disorganization, and excessive cell proliferation. In comparison, these abnormalities were not observed in vascular endothelial cells (VECs) derived from the patient's iPSCs. Importantly, the abnormal upregulation of NF-κB target genes in CADASIL VSMCs was diminished by a NOTCH pathway inhibitor, providing a potential therapeutic strategy for CADASIL. Overall, using this iPSC-based disease model, our study identified clues for studying the pathogenic mechanisms of CADASIL and developing treatment strategies for this disease.

11.
Protein & Cell ; (12): 649-667, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-757890

ABSTRACT

RAP1 is a well-known telomere-binding protein, but its functions in human stem cells have remained unclear. Here we generated RAP1-deficient human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) by using CRISPR/Cas9 technique and obtained RAP1-deficient human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and neural stem cells (hNSCs) via directed differentiation. In both hMSCs and hNSCs, RAP1 not only negatively regulated telomere length but also acted as a transcriptional regulator of RELN by tuning the methylation status of its gene promoter. RAP1 deficiency enhanced self-renewal and delayed senescence in hMSCs, but not in hNSCs, suggesting complicated lineage-specific effects of RAP1 in adult stem cells. Altogether, these results demonstrate for the first time that RAP1 plays both telomeric and nontelomeric roles in regulating human stem cell homeostasis.

12.
Protein & Cell ; (12): 485-495, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-757879

ABSTRACT

Identification of the precise molecular pathways involved in oncogene-induced transformation may help us gain a better understanding of tumor initiation and promotion. Here, we demonstrate that SOX2 foregut epithelial cells are prone to oncogenic transformation upon mutagenic insults, such as Kras and p53 deletion. GFP-based lineage-tracing experiments indicate that SOX2 cells are the cells-of-origin of esophagus and stomach hyperplasia. Our observations indicate distinct roles for oncogenic KRAS mutation and P53 deletion. p53 homozygous deletion is required for the acquisition of an invasive potential, and Kras expression, but not p53 deletion, suffices for tumor formation. Global gene expression analysis reveals secreting factors upregulated in the hyperplasia induced by oncogenic KRAS and highlights a crucial role for the CXCR2 pathway in driving hyperplasia. Collectively, the array of genetic models presented here demonstrate that stratified epithelial cells are susceptible to oncogenic insults, which may lead to a better understanding of tumor initiation and aid in the design of new cancer therapeutics.

13.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-774118

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#To investigate the risk factors for brain injury in preterm infants by a multicenter epidemiological investigation of brain injury in hospitalized preterm infants in Anhui, China.@*METHODS@#Preterm infants who were hospitalized in the department of neonatology in 9 hospitals of Anhui Neonatal Collaboration Network between January 2016 and January 2017 were enrolled as subjects. The data of maternal pregnancy and clinical data of preterm infants were collected, and the logistic regression model was used to analyze the risk factors for brain injury in preterm infants.@*RESULTS@#A total of 3 378 preterm infants were enrolled. Of the 3 378 preterm infants, 798 (23.56%) had periventricular-intraventricular hemorrhage (PVH-IVH), and 88 (2.60%) had periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). Intrauterine distress, anemia, hypoglycemia and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) were risk factors for PVH-IVH (OR=1.310, 1.591, 1.835, and 3.310 respectively; P<0.05), while a higher gestational age was a protective factor against PVH-IVH (OR=0.671, P<0.05). PVH-IVH, NEC and mechanical ventilation were risk factors for PVL (OR=4.017, 3.018, and 2.166 respectively; P<0.05), and female sex and use of pulmonary surfactant were protective factors against PVL (OR=0.514 and 0.418 respectively; P<0.05).@*CONCLUSIONS@#Asphyxia/anoxia, infection/inflammation, mechanical ventilation, anemia and hypoglycemia may increase the risk of brain injury in preterm infants.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries , Cerebral Hemorrhage , China , Gestational Age , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Premature , Leukomalacia, Periventricular
14.
International Eye Science ; (12): 319-321, 2018.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-695188

ABSTRACT

AIM:To observe the influence of wearing nocturnal orthokeratology lens on sleep quality in myopic patients.?METHODS: Totally 30 myopic patients ( 58 eyes ) wearing nocturnal orthokeratology lens, who received medical treatment at the Department of Ophthalmology of Affiliated People's Hospital of Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, were included in study ( treated group ) . And 30 myopic patients wearing spectacles at the same time were randomly selected as the control group. Sleep quality of two groups were assessed with Pittsburgh sleep quality index ( PSQI ) before and after wearing the lens in the first and the third months, and compared.?RESULTS:Equivalent diopter of the 30 patients wearing nocturnal orthokeratology lens was -2. 78D±0. 90D before treated with orthokeratology lens, -0. 30D ± 0. 31D after 1mo of treatment, and -0. 28D ± 0. 30D after 3mo of treatment. There was significant difference between the equivalent diopter got before treated with orthokeratology lens and that got after 1mo of treatment (P<0.05), and between the equivalent diopter got before treated with orthokeratology lens and that got after 3mo of treatment (P<0. 05). The total scores of PSQI of 30 myopic patients got before wearing nocturnal orthokeratology lens and after 1 or 3mo of that were respectively 2. 13±1. 36, 2. 47±1. 98, and 1. 74±1. 39. There only was significant difference in scores of subjective sleep quality got after 3mo of treatment between treated group and control group (P<0. 05), but no significant difference in scores of total PSQI, sleep latency, sleep duration, habitual sleep efficiency, sleep disturbances, use of sleeping medication, and daytime dysfunction( P>0. 05).?CONCLUSION:Wearing nocturnal orthokeratology lens has no significant effect on the overall sleep quality index of myopic patients, but the subjective sleep quality decreased in the early stage of wearing the lens.

15.
Protein & Cell ; (12): 333-350, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-757991

ABSTRACT

Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) and Werner syndrome (WS) are two of the best characterized human progeroid syndromes. HGPS is caused by a point mutation in lamin A (LMNA) gene, resulting in the production of a truncated protein product-progerin. WS is caused by mutations in WRN gene, encoding a loss-of-function RecQ DNA helicase. Here, by gene editing we created isogenic human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) with heterozygous (G608G/+) or homozygous (G608G/G608G) LMNA mutation and biallelic WRN knockout, for modeling HGPS and WS pathogenesis, respectively. While ESCs and endothelial cells (ECs) did not present any features of premature senescence, HGPS- and WS-mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) showed aging-associated phenotypes with different kinetics. WS-MSCs had early-onset mild premature aging phenotypes while HGPS-MSCs exhibited late-onset acute premature aging characterisitcs. Taken together, our study compares and contrasts the distinct pathologies underpinning the two premature aging disorders, and provides reliable stem-cell based models to identify new therapeutic strategies for pathological and physiological aging.


Subject(s)
Aging , Genetics , Physiology , DNA Helicases , Genetics , Human Embryonic Stem Cells , Metabolism , Physiology , Humans , Kinetics , Lamin Type A , Genetics , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , Metabolism , Physiology , Mutation , Progeria , Genetics , Werner Syndrome , Genetics
16.
Protein & Cell ; (12): 945-965, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-757939

ABSTRACT

Vascular cell functionality is critical to blood vessel homeostasis. Constitutive NF-κB activation in vascular cells results in chronic vascular inflammation, leading to various cardiovascular diseases. However, how NF-κB regulates human blood vessel homeostasis remains largely elusive. Here, using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing, we generated RelA knockout human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and differentiated them into various vascular cell derivatives to study how NF-κB modulates human vascular cells under basal and inflammatory conditions. Multi-dimensional phenotypic assessments and transcriptomic analyses revealed that RelA deficiency affected vascular cells via modulating inflammation, survival, vasculogenesis, cell differentiation and extracellular matrix organization in a cell type-specific manner under basal condition, and that RelA protected vascular cells against apoptosis and modulated vascular inflammatory response upon tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) stimulation. Lastly, further evaluation of gene expression patterns in IκBα knockout vascular cells demonstrated that IκBα acted largely independent of RelA signaling. Taken together, our data reveal a protective role of NF-κB/RelA in modulating human blood vessel homeostasis and map the human vascular transcriptomic landscapes for the discovery of novel therapeutic targets.


Subject(s)
Blood Vessels , Cell Biology , Metabolism , CRISPR-Cas Systems , Embryonic Stem Cells , Cell Biology , Gene Knockout Techniques , Homeostasis , Humans , NF-kappa B , Metabolism , Transcription Factor RelA , Metabolism
17.
Protein & Cell ; (12): 365-378, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-756992

ABSTRACT

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a complex neurodegenerative disease with cellular and molecular mechanisms yet to be fully described. Mutations in a number of genes including SOD1 and FUS are associated with familial ALS. Here we report the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts of familial ALS patients bearing SOD1 and FUS mutations, respectively. We further generated gene corrected ALS iPSCs using CRISPR/Cas9 system. Genome-wide RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis of motor neurons derived from SOD1 and corrected iPSCs revealed 899 aberrant transcripts. Our work may shed light on discovery of early biomarkers and pathways dysregulated in ALS, as well as provide a basis for novel therapeutic strategies to treat ALS.


Subject(s)
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis , Genetics , Metabolism , Therapeutics , Cell Line , Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats , Genetic Therapy , Genome-Wide Association Study , Humans , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells , Metabolism , Mutation, Missense , RNA-Binding Protein FUS , Genetics , Metabolism , Superoxide Dismutase-1 , Genetics , Metabolism
18.
Protein & Cell ; (12): 478-488, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-757417

ABSTRACT

Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder that mainly affects tissues derived from mesoderm. We have recently developed a novel human WS model using WRN-deficient human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). This model recapitulates many phenotypic features of WS. Based on a screen of a number of chemicals, here we found that Vitamin C exerts most efficient rescue for many features in premature aging as shown in WRN-deficient MSCs, including cell growth arrest, increased reactive oxygen species levels, telomere attrition, excessive secretion of inflammatory factors, as well as disorganization of nuclear lamina and heterochromatin. Moreover, Vitamin C restores in vivo viability of MSCs in a mouse model. RNA sequencing analysis indicates that Vitamin C alters the expression of a series of genes involved in chromatin condensation, cell cycle regulation, DNA replication, and DNA damage repair pathways in WRN-deficient MSCs. Our results identify Vitamin C as a rejuvenating factor for WS MSCs, which holds the potential of being applied as a novel type of treatment of WS.


Subject(s)
Animals , Ascorbic Acid , Pharmacology , Cell Cycle Checkpoints , Cell Line , Cellular Senescence , DNA Damage , DNA Repair , DNA Replication , Disease Models, Animal , Heterochromatin , Metabolism , Pathology , Humans , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , Metabolism , Pathology , Mice , Nuclear Lamina , Metabolism , Pathology , Reactive Oxygen Species , Metabolism , Telomere Homeostasis , Werner Syndrome , Drug Therapy , Genetics , Metabolism
19.
Protein & Cell ; (12): 210-221, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-757146

ABSTRACT

Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a group of genetic disorders caused by mutations of XP-associated genes, resulting in impairment of DNA repair. XP patients frequently exhibit neurological degeneration, but the underlying mechanism is unknown, in part due to lack of proper disease models. Here, we generated patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) harboring mutations in five different XP genes including XPA, XPB, XPC, XPG, and XPV. These iPSCs were further differentiated to neural cells, and their susceptibility to DNA damage stress was investigated. Mutation of XPA in either neural stem cells (NSCs) or neurons resulted in severe DNA damage repair defects, and these neural cells with mutant XPA were hyper-sensitive to DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Thus, XP-mutant neural cells represent valuable tools to clarify the molecular mechanisms of neurological abnormalities in the XP patients.


Subject(s)
DNA Damage , DNA Repair , DNA-Binding Proteins , Genetics , Metabolism , Female , Humans , Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells , Metabolism , Pathology , Male , Models, Biological , Mutation , Neural Stem Cells , Metabolism , Pathology , Xeroderma Pigmentosum , Genetics , Metabolism , Pathology
20.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-304328

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To study clinical value of shear wave elastography (SWE) in the evaluation of neck-shoulder myofascial pain syndrome.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>From December 2013 to July 2014,30 patients diagnosed as neck-shoulder myofascial pain syndrome were in the treatment group,including 17 males and 13 females, with an average age of (44 ± 3) years old. Thirty healthy people were in the control group, including 22 males and 8 females, with a mean age of (37 ± 5) years old. The patients in the treatment group were treated with manipulation, once every other day, total 7 times. The SWE was used to detect tension part of trapezius muscle of patients in the treatment group before and after treatment, as well as to detect muscle belly at the descending part of trapezius muscle in the control group. The tissue elasticity and Yang's modulus value were recorded and compared.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>The tissue elasticity chart of patients in the treatment group before treatment was mainly greenish blue with the score of 3.70 ± 1.53, and the Yang's modulus was (43.4 ± 15.6) kPa. The tissue elasticity figure after treatment was mainly blue with the score of 2.40 ± 0.87, and the Yang's modulus was (29.0 ± 5.9) kPa. Whereas in the control group, the tissue elasticity figure was mainly blue with the score of 1.60 ± 0.72, and the Yang's modulus was (24.0 ± 7.6) kPa. These were statistical differences between the two groups (P = 0.000).</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>SWE can be used as an evaluation method of manipulation treatment for neck-shoulder myofascial pain syndrome, which is an objective and sensitive detection method.</p>


Subject(s)
Adult , Elasticity Imaging Techniques , Methods , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Musculoskeletal Manipulations , Myofascial Pain Syndromes , Diagnosis , Therapeutics , Neck , Shoulder
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