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1.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-766892

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We report a case of Aeromonas keratitis presenting as radial keratoneuritis. CASE SUMMARY: A 33-year-old woman with a history of cleaning her contact lenses with tap water presented with decreased visual acuity for 1 day in the left eye. The patient showed diffuse corneal edema, stromal infiltration, and radial keratoneuritis, which were thought to be pathognomonic for Aeromonas keratitis. Based on the patient's clinical findings and past history, a diagnosis of Aeromonas keratitis was made and she was prescribed topical fortified cefazolin (50 mg/mL, 5%), tobramycin (3 mg/mL), and 0.02% chlorhexidine per hour. Culture results from the contact lens and contact lens solution confirmed infection by Aeromonas hydrophilia. Polymerase chain reaction results for Aeromonas were negative. After 8 days of treatment, the uncorrected visual acuity was 0.7/0.3 with improvement in her corneal findings. CONCLUSIONS: Radial keratoneuritis is not always pathognomic for Aeromonas keratitis and can be present in Aeromonas keratitis. Therefore, ophthalmologists should be cautious when interpreting this clinical sign.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aeromonas , Cefazolin , Chlorhexidine , Contact Lens Solutions , Contact Lenses , Cornea , Corneal Edema , Diagnosis , Female , Humans , Keratitis , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Tobramycin , Visual Acuity , Water
2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-719473

ABSTRACT

Cytogenetic dosimetry is useful for evaluating the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation based on analysis of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations. We created two types of in vitro dose-response calibration curves for dicentric chromosomes (DC) and translocations (TR) induced by X-ray irradiation, using an electron linear accelerator, which is the most frequently used medical device in radiotherapy. We irradiated samples from four healthy Korean individuals and compared the resultant curves between individuals. Aberration yields were studied in a total of 31,800 and 31,725 metaphases for DC and TR, respectively, obtained from 11 X-ray irradiation dose-points (0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 Gy). The dose-response relationship followed a linear-quadratic equation, Y=C+αD+βD², with the coefficients C=0.0011 for DC and 0.0015 for TR, α=0.0119 for DC and 0.0048 for TR, and β=0.0617 for DC and 0.0237 for TR. Correlation coefficients between irradiation doses and chromosomal aberrations were 0.971 for DC and 0.6 for TR, indicating a very strong and a moderate correlation, respectively. This is the first study implementing cytogenetic dosimetry following exposure to ionizing X-radiation.


Subject(s)
Calibration , Chromosome Aberrations , Cytogenetics , In Vitro Techniques , Particle Accelerators , Radiation, Ionizing , Radiotherapy
5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-224341

ABSTRACT

Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) has been suggested as a useful new biomarker of lung cancer; however, few relevant large-scale studies have been published. In this study, we evaluated the utility of serum HE4 for lung cancer detection. HE4 levels were measured in serum samples from 100 lung cancer patients, 57 patients with benign lung diseases, and 274 healthy controls by using a chemiluminescent immunoassay, and variations in HE4 levels were analyzed by clinical status such as lung cancer, benign lung disease, and healthy condition, Tumor, Lymph Nodes, Metastasis (TNM) stage, tumor score, and histological cancer type. Lung cancer patients had significantly higher serum HE4 levels than patients with benign lung diseases and healthy controls (P<0.0001). The area under the ROC curve for HE4 was 0.84 (95% confidence interval, 0.78–0.89; P<0.0001) between lung cancer patients and healthy controls. Serum HE4 levels were significantly higher in patients with advanced disease (according to TNM stage) than in healthy controls (P<0.0001). HE4 levels were significantly elevated in patients with tumors of all types, those of different histological subgroups, and those with the smallest tumors (P=0.002). This report supports the potential of serum HE4 as an ancillary diagnostic marker for lung cancer detection.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers, Tumor , Epididymal Secretory Proteins , Humans , Immunoassay , Lung Diseases , Lung Neoplasms , Lung , Lymph Nodes , Male , Neoplasm Metastasis , ROC Curve
6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-123893

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To identify bacterial contamination rates of laryngoscope blades and handles stored in emergency crash carts by hospital and area according to the frequency of intubation attempts. METHODS: One hundred forty-eight handles and 71 blades deemed ready for patient use from two tertiary hospitals were sampled with sterile swabs using a standardized rolling technique. Samples were considered negative (not contaminated) if no colonies were present on the blood agar plate after an 18-hour incubation period. Samples were stratified by hospital and according to the frequency of intubation attempts (10 attempts per year) using the χ2-test and Fisher exact test. RESULTS: One or more species of bacteria were isolated from 4 (5.6%) handle tops, 20 (28.2%) handles with knurled surfaces, and 27 (18.2%) blades. No significant differences were found in microbial contamination levels on the handle tops and blades between the two hospitals and two areas according to the frequency of intubation attempts. However, significant differences were found between the two hospitals and two areas in the level of microbial contamination on the handles with knurled surfaces (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Protocols and policies must be reviewed to standardize procedures to clean and disinfect laryngoscope blades and handles; handles should be re-designed to eliminate points of contact with the blade; and single-use, one-piece laryngoscopes should be introduced.


Subject(s)
Agar , Bacteria , Disinfection , Emergencies , Equipment Contamination , Humans , Intubation , Laryngoscopes , Tertiary Care Centers
8.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-45808

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prompt and accurate urine chemistry analysis is important to provide information for diagnosis and therapy. In this study, we evaluated the overall performance and utility of an automated chemistry analyser for urine chemistry testing in accordance with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. METHODS: From January 2015 to March 2015, we evaluated the precision, linearity, limits of detection, carryover, and turnaround times after automation of nine items: total protein, albumin, glucose, blood urea nitrogen, total calcium, magnesium, inorganic phosphate, creatinine, and uric acid. A Hitachi 7600-110 instrument (Hitachi Ltd., Japan) and Hitachi ID Privileged Access Manager (Hitachi Ltd.) were used for automated chemistry analysis and sample preparation, respectively. RESULTS: Regarding precision, the coefficient of variation was 3.9% to 1.6% for high levels and 3.3% to 24.1% for low levels. The linearity and coefficients of determination of all the test items were acceptable. Performance comparison revealed that the two systems were comparable, as evidenced by correlation coefficients >0.975 for most items; moreover, carryover of all items was <1%. The mean turnaround time was 59 minutes. CONCLUSIONS: Urine chemistry testing can be performed with acceptable precision, linearity, and performance by using the Hitachi 7600-110 automated chemistry analyser. The sample preparation system reduces turnaround time, which enhances the clinical utility of urine chemistry testing.


Subject(s)
Automation , Blood Glucose , Calcium , Chemistry , Creatinine , Diagnosis , Limit of Detection , Magnesium , Nitrogen , Urea , Uric Acid
9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-34957

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii are a threat to hospitalized patients. We evaluated the effects of antimicrobial combinations on XDR P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii isolates. METHODS: P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii isolates, which were resistant to all antibiotics except colistin (CL), were collected from eight hospitals in Korea. Genes encoding metallo-beta-lactamases (MBLs) and OXA carbapenemases were detected by PCR in eight P. aeruginosa and 30 A. baumannii isolates. In vitro synergy of antimicrobial combinations was tested by using the checkerboard method. RESULTS: Minimum inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolones were very high, while that of CL was low for majority of XDR P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii isolates. Antimicrobial combinations including Imipenem (IPM)-CL, ceftazidime (CAZ)-CL, and rifampin (RIF)-CL exerted only additive/indifferent effects on majority of XDR P. aeruginosa isolates. Proportions of XDR A. baumannii isolates that showed synergistic and additive/indifferent inhibition after treatment with antimicrobial combinations used are as follows: IPM-ampicillin-sulbactam (AMS), 17% and 80% isolates, respectively; IPM-rifampin (RIF), 13% and 81% isolates, respectively; IPM-CL, 13% and 87% isolates, respectively; and RIF-COL, 20% and 73% isolates, respectively. Significant proportion (19%) of XDR P. aeruginosa isolates produced MBLs, and majority (82%) of A. baumannii isolates produced either MBLs or OXA-23. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that combinations of IPM-AMS, IPM-RIF, IPM-CL, and RIF-CL are more useful than individual drugs for treating 13-20% of XDR A. baumannii infections.


Subject(s)
Acinetobacter baumannii/drug effects , Aminoglycosides/pharmacology , Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Bacterial Proteins/genetics , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial/drug effects , Drug Synergism , Fluoroquinolones/pharmacology , Imipenem/pharmacology , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects , beta-Lactamases/genetics
10.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 550-555, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-38895

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The genus Aeromonas is a pathogen that is well known to cause severe clinical illnesses, ranging from gastroenteritis to sepsis. Accurate identification of A. hydrophila, A. caviae, and A. veronii is important for the care of patients. However, species identification remains difficult using conventional methods. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of different methods of identifying Aeromonas at the species level: a biochemical method, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry-time of flight (MALDI-TOF MS), 16S rRNA sequencing, and housekeeping gene sequencing (gyrB, rpoB). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed 65 Aeromonas isolates recovered from patients at a university hospital in Korea between 1996 and 2012. The isolates were recovered from frozen states and tested using the following four methods: a conventional biochemical method, 16S rRNA sequencing, housekeeping gene sequencing with phylogenetic analysis, and MALDI-TOF MS. RESULTS: The conventional biochemical method and 16S rRNA sequencing identified Aeromonas at the genus level very accurately, although species level identification was unsatisfactory. MALDI-TOF MS system correctly identified 60 (92.3%) isolates at the species level and an additional four (6.2%) at the genus level. Overall, housekeeping gene sequencing with phylogenetic analysis was found to be the most accurate in identifying Aeromonas at the species level. CONCLUSION: The most accurate method of identification of Aeromonas to species level is by housekeeping gene sequencing, although high cost and technical difficulty hinder its usage in clinical settings. An easy-to-use identification method is needed for clinical laboratories, for which MALDI-TOF MS could be a strong candidate.


Subject(s)
Aeromonas/classification , DNA, Bacterial/genetics , Genes, Essential/genetics , Humans , Molecular Typing/methods , Phylogeny , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , Republic of Korea , Sensitivity and Specificity , Sequence Analysis, DNA/methods , Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization/methods
12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-190835

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Antimicrobial surveillance is important for providing an up-to-date understanding of the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance and for creating a forum for rational drug development. In this study, we analyzed antimicrobial test data generated in 2011 by hospitals and commercial laboratories participating in the Korean Nationwide Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance program (KONSAR). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data on the results of susceptibility tests conducted in 32 hospitals and two commercial laboratories were analyzed. Data on isolates from patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) and those admitted to other wards were compared. Intermediate susceptibility was not analyzed and duplicate isolates were excluded. RESULTS: Escherichia coli was the most prevalent organism identified in both the hospital and commercial laboratories. Among the hospital isolates, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), penicillin G-non-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae, and ampicillin-resistant Enterococcus faecium remained as prevalent as they were in 2009. The proportion of vancomycin-resistant E. faecium (VR-EFM) slightly decreased from 29% in 2009 to 23% in 2011. Resistance rates of Klebsiella pneumoniae to ceftazidime, cefoxitin, fluoroquinolone, and amikacin were 24%, 14%, 27%, and 8%, respectively. Resistance rates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to fluoroquinolone, ceftazidime, imipenem, and amikacin were 33%, 20%, 22%, and 16%, respectively, whereas those of Acinetobacter spp. resistance were 71%, 66%, 64, and 51%, respectively. The prevalence of oxyimino-cephalosporin-resistant E. coli and K. pneumoniae, carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp. and P. aeruginosa, MRSA, and VR-EFM among ICU isolates was higher than those among non-ICU isolates. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing E. coli and K. pneumoniae, imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa, and VR-EFM were more prevalent among isolates from commercial laboratories than those from hospitals. Resistance rates of K. pneumoniae to ceftazidime and amikacin decreased from 32% and 24% in 2005 to 24% and 8% in 2011, respectively. The resistance rate of P. aeruginosa to amikacin decreased from 22% in 2005 to 16% in 2011. The proportion of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp. increased from 16% in 2005 to 64% in 2011. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of MRSA, penicillin G-non-susceptible S. pneumoniae, and ampicillin-resistant E. faecium among clinical isolates tested in laboratories remained high. Multidrug resistance was more prevalent among isolates from ICUs. The prevalence of ceftazidime-resistant and amikacin-resistant K. pneumoniae and amikacin-resistant P. aeruginosa decreased after 2005, while the prevalence of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp. increased.


Subject(s)
Acinetobacter , Amikacin , Cefoxitin , Ceftazidime , Drug Resistance, Multiple , Enterococcus faecium , Epidemiology , Escherichia coli , Humans , Imipenem , Intensive Care Units , Klebsiella pneumoniae , Korea , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus , Penicillins , Pneumonia , Prevalence , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , Salmonella , Staphylococcus , Streptococcus pneumoniae
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-163726

ABSTRACT

Mycobacterium neoaurum is rapidly growing mycobacteria that can cause human infections. It commonly causes bloodstream infections in immunocompromised hosts, and unlike other mycobacteria species, it rarely causes pulmonary infections. We confirmed the first pulmonary infection case in Korea caused by M. neoaurum using full-length 16S rRNA gene sequencing.


Subject(s)
Adult , Female , Humans , Lung Diseases/diagnosis , Mycobacterium/genetics , Mycobacterium Infections/diagnosis , Nontuberculous Mycobacteria/genetics , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics , Republic of Korea , Sequence Analysis, RNA
14.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-60457

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Majority of clinical laboratories disseminate laboratory test information through guidebooks or handouts. However, these methods cannot instantly confer information, for example, when a novel laboratory test is introduced, or a change is made to a test request procedure or type of specimen involved. To overcome these limitations, we developed a mobile web application that is a laboratory test information repository, initially for use in Korea. METHODS: We established a laboratory master database of searchable laboratory test information using a web-based framework. Information pertaining to clinical test indications, interpretation of test results, and related laboratory tests was revised; test request guidelines were also updated. Information concerning tests that are occasionally subject to change and newly introduced tests was updated promptly. RESULTS: Our mobile web-based application uses the domain name www.schlab.org and can also be accessed via a desktop browser. The information for each test includes basic details such as specimen type, container, turnaround time, and so on and an introduction in addition to a more detailed explanation of associated tests and usage recommendations. The number of monthly visitors to the site was 529 (649 page views), with visitors using the mobile web for 31 seconds per visit. CONCLUSIONS: We developed a mobile web application that provides information on laboratory tests. We improved on the existing method of transmitting such information (i.e., a laboratory request guidebook) by offering a system that provides updated test information and increased accessibility. Our method is expected to reduce instances of inaccurate or unnecessary test orders, improper specimen collection, delayed specimen arrival, and inappropriate treatment.


Subject(s)
Clinical Laboratory Services , Information Services , Korea , Mobile Applications , Specimen Handling , Smartphone
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-214989

ABSTRACT

The most common recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities in T-lymphoblastic leukemia (T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia [T-ALL]) involve T-cell receptor (TCR) loci and a variety of partner genes, including HOX11, HOX11L2, MYC, and TAL1. In this report, we present a rare case involving simultaneous translocation of the TCR alpha/delta loci with different partner loci (Xq22 and 12p13); this resulted in a poor prognosis. Chromosomal analysis showed 46,Y,t(X;14)(q22;q11.2),t(12;14)(p13;q11.2) and FISH analysis by using a T-cell receptor alpha delta DNA probe, Split Signal (DakoCytomation, Denmark), showed translocations at the same TCR alpha/delta locus on both chromosomes. FISH with 2 bacterial artificial chromosome clones showed break apart signal, which suggests involvement of the IRS4 gene. To our knowledge, this is the first report of T-ALL in which both TCR alpha/delta loci were translocated with different partner loci, and 1 of the partner loci, Xq22, was a rare translocation partner locus that included IRS4 gene.


Subject(s)
Adult , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 12 , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 14 , Chromosomes, Human, X , Genetic Loci , Humans , Insulin Receptor Substrate Proteins/genetics , Karyotyping , Male , Precursor T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/genetics , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/genetics , Translocation, Genetic
16.
Infection and Chemotherapy ; : 462-464, 2012.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-218094

ABSTRACT

Salmonella septic arthritis in a healthy, immunocompetent patient is extremely rare. We experienced a case of septic arthritis of the knee caused by Salmonella Group D in a patient with Non-small cell lung cancer. A 43-year-old female receiving steroid therapy for treatment of Non-small cell lung cancer with metastasis to the spinal cord complained of painful swelling of the right knee joint. Culture of synovial fluid obtained by aspiration yielded growth of Salmonella Group D. The patient was treated with ceftriaxone; however, she expired on the ninth day after treatment.


Subject(s)
Arthritis , Arthritis, Infectious , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung , Female , Humans , Knee , Knee Joint , Neoplasm Metastasis , Salmonella , Salmonella enteritidis , Spinal Cord , Synovial Fluid
17.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-127540

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Metallo-beta-lactamase-mediated carbapenem resistance has been increasingly reported in Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter and other Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) in many countries. A few studies showed highly variable structure of MBL-gene cassette-carrying integrons. The aim of this study was to determine the structure of blaVIM-2-carrying integrons in Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter. METHODS: blaVIM-2-carrying GNB were isolated at a Korean hospitals during the years 1995-1999 and 2005. The size of blaVIM-2-carrying integrons was estimated by the PCR products. Representative integrons were sequenced by the dideoxy-chain termination method. The MICs of antimicrobial agents were tested by the CLSI agar dilution methods. RESULTS: During the years 1995-1999 and 2005, the approximate size of the blaVIM-2-carrying class 1 integrons was 3-7 kb in 35 Pseudomonas isolates and 3-5 kb in 24 Acinetobacter isolates. The integrons carried one-five resistance gene cassettes in addition to the blaVIM-2 cassette. Other resistance gene cassettes found were blaOXA-1, aacA1, aac(6')-I, and aac(6')-II. Interestingly, sequences homologous to part of a putative class II intron were inserted into the recombination site of the last cassette in four of nine integrons. The class 1 integron from P. aeruginosa isolates had fused orf/IntI1 in a downstream leftward inverted repeat (IRi). CONCLUSION: According to period, the size and structure of blaVIM-2-carrying integrons are quite variable, but an identical one is also present in a different genus, indicating high mobility of the blaVIM-2 cassette and horizontal transfer of the whole integron. We suggest that the class 1 integron containing the blaVIM-2 gene is spreading horizontally among Gram-negative bacilli and is undergoing continuous development in Korea.


Subject(s)
Acinetobacter , Agar , Anti-Infective Agents , Integrons , Introns , Korea , Lifting , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Pseudomonas , Recombination, Genetic
18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-47754

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe-based real-time PCR (PNAqPCR(TM) TB/NTM detection kit; PANAGENE, Korea) assay has been recently developed for the simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in clinical specimens. The study was aimed at evaluation of the performance of PNA probe-based real-time PCR in respiratory specimens. METHODS: To evaluate potential cross-reactivity, the extracted DNA specimens from Mycobacterium species and non-mycobacterial species were tested using PNA probe-based real-time PCR assay. A total of 531 respiratory specimens (482 sputum specimens and 49 bronchoalveolar washing fluid specimens) were collected from 230 patients in July and August, 2011. All specimens were analyzed for the detection of mycobacteria by direct smear examination, mycobacterial culture, and PNA probe-based real-time PCR assay. RESULTS: In cross-reactivity tests, no false-positive or false-negative results were evident. When the culture method was used as the gold standard test for comparison, PNA probe-based real-time PCR assay for detection of MTBC had a sensitivity and specificity of 96.7% (58/60) and 99.6% (469/471), respectively. Assuming the combination of culture and clinical diagnosis as the standard, the sensitivity and specificity of the new real-time PCR assay for detection of MTBC were 90.6% (58/64) and 99.6% (465/467), respectively. The new real-time PCR for the detection of NTM had a sensitivity and specificity of 69.0% (29/42) and 100% (489/489), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The new real-time PCR assay may be useful for the detection of MTBC in respiratory specimens and for discrimination of NTM from MTBC.


Subject(s)
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/microbiology , DNA Probes/chemistry , DNA, Bacterial/analysis , Humans , Molecular Typing/methods , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/genetics , Nontuberculous Mycobacteria/genetics , Nucleic Acid Hybridization , Peptide Nucleic Acids/chemistry , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Respiratory System/microbiology , Sputum/microbiology
19.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-113506

ABSTRACT

Brevundimonas diminuta is a lactose non-fermenting Gram-negative rod associated with infection in immunocompromised patients. In three patients from two general wards, B. diminuta was isolated in blood culture sample. The clinical features of the patients did not coincide with the blood culture result, and pseudo-outbreak was suspected. These isolated were biochemically identified as Brevundimonas diminuta, and 16S rRNA sequencing confirmed their identification. The PFGE result showed a single pattern, and their clonality was assumed.


Subject(s)
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Lactose , Patients' Rooms
20.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-9038

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Standardized management and surveillance at a national level is essential to maintain blood product safety. Officials of the Korean Division of Human Blood Safety Surveillance, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Korean laboratory transfusion medicine specialists, currently participate as inspectors in the Korean National Blood Inspection Program for Blood Establishments. However, lack of definitive guidelines and absence of standardized inspector training programs compromise the goal of objective and consistent safety management results. In this study, we propose establishment of written inspection guidelines and a clearly documented accreditation training program. METHODS: Inspector training programs in the US and EU were reviewed online and the results of the Korean National Blood Inspection in our country performed during last 4 years were analyzed. RESULTS: We suggested inspection guidelines for every question of inspection checklists. Also, for the questions similar to those of Laboratory Accreditation Program of the Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine (KSLM), guidelines were proposed as 'Results of Laboratory Accreditation Program of the KSLM could be concerned if inspected laboratory obtained 2 year accreditation lately'. We suggest an 18hr-basic training program composed of lectures, e-learning and a visit to a blood center, as well as 12hr-continuing courses, should be established. CONCLUSION: To establish the Blood Inspection Program in a more systematic manner, thorough management and training of inspectors are essential. We expect the guidelines and training program for inspectors, suggested in our study, will be the cornerstone for creating a more professional quality management system and further ensure the safety of the national blood management system.


Subject(s)
Accreditation , Blood Safety , Checklist , Dietary Sucrose , Humans , Korea , Lecture , Safety Management , Specialization
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