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1.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 224-230, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-875615

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is ubiquitous in the environment, but NTM lung disease (NTM-LD) is uncommon. Since exposure to NTM is inevitable, patients who develop NTM-LD are likely to have specific susceptibility factors, such as primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). PCD is a genetically heterogeneous disorder of motile cilia and is characterized by chronic respiratory tract infection, organ laterality defect, and infertility. In this study, we performed whole exome sequencing (WES) and investigated the genetic characteristics of adult NTM patients with suspected PCD. @*Materials and Methods@#WES was performed in 13 NTM-LD patients who were suspected of having PCD by clinical symptoms and/or ultrastructural ciliary defect observed by transmission electron microscopy. A total of 45 PCD-causing genes, 23 PCDcandidate genes, and 990 ciliome genes were analyzed. @*Results@#Four patients were found to have biallelic loss-of-function (LoF) variants in the following PCD-causing genes: CCDC114, DNAH5, HYDIN, and NME5. In four other patients, only one LoF variant was identified, while the remaining five patients did not have any LoF variants. @*Conclusion@#At least 30.8% of NTM-LD patients who were suspected of having PCD had biallelic LoF variants, and an additional 30.8% of patients had one LoF variant. Therefore, PCD should be considered in patients with NTM-LD with symptoms or signs suspicious of PCD.

2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-874170

ABSTRACT

In response to the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, an online laboratory surveillance system was established to monitor severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) real-time reverse transcription-PCR (rRT-PCR) testing capacities and results. SARS-CoV-2 rRT-PCR testing data were collected from 97 clinical laboratories, including 84 medical institutions and 13 independent clinical laboratories in Korea. We assessed the testing capacities to utilize SARS-CoV-2 rRT-PCR based on surveillance data obtained from February 7th to June 4th, 2020 and evaluated positive result characteristics according to the reagents used and sample types. A total of 1,890,319 SARS-CoV-2 rRT-PCR testing were performed, 2.3% of which were positive. Strong correlations were observed between the envelope (E ) gene and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp )ucleocapsid (N ) genes threshold cycle (Ct) values for each reagent. No statistically significant differences in gene Ct values were observed between the paired upper and lower respiratory tract samples, except in the N gene for nasopharyngeal swab and sputum samples. Our study showed that clinical laboratories in Korea have rapidly expanded their testing capacities in response to the COVID-19 outbreak, with a peak daily capacity of 34,193 tests. Rapid expansion in testing capacity is a critical component of the national response to the ongoing pandemic.

3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-899960

ABSTRACT

Background@#For the 2018–2019 season, the national influenza immunization program expanded to cover children aged from 6 months to 12 years in Korea. This study aimed to analyze vaccine effectiveness (VE) against influenza in children visiting the pediatric emergency room at a tertiary hospital during the 2018-2019 season. @*Methods@#Patients tested for influenza antigens from October 1st 2018 to May 31st 2019 at the pediatric emergency room of Samsung Medical Center were included. Patients' influenza antigen test results, influenza vaccination history, and underlying medical conditions were reviewed retrospectively. VE was estimated from the test-negative design study. @*Results@#Among the 2,901 visits with influenza test results 1,692 visits of 1,417 patients were included for analysis. Among these 1,417 patients, 285 (20.1%) were positive (influenza A, n = 211, 74.0%; influenza B, n = 74, 26.0%). The VE in all patients was 36.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.9 to 53.1). The VE for influenza A was 37.6% (95% CI, 12.6 to 55.5) and VE for influenza B was 24.0% (−38.5 to 58.3). The VE in the age group 6 months to 12 years was significant with a value of 35.6% (95% CI, 10.5 to 53.7); it was not statistically significant in the age group 13 to 18 years. In a multivariate logistic regression model, patients who received an influenza vaccination were less likely to get influenza infection (OR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.4 to 0.8; P = 0.001), with significant confounding factors such as age group 13 to 18 years (OR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3 to 0.8; P = 0.003) and underlying hematology-oncology disease (OR, 0.3;95% CI, 0.1 to 0.6; P = 0.002). @*Conclusion@#We report moderate effectiveness of influenza vaccination in previously healthy children aged from 6 months to 12 years in the 2018-2019 season.

4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-895436

ABSTRACT

Invasive fungal infection (IFI) is a serious threat to pediatric patients with cancer given high morbidity and mortality. We present an 18-year-old male with precursor T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia who developed Pancoast syndrome, presented with paresthesia and numbness in the right shoulder and arm during a neutropenic fever period. He was diagnosed with pneumonia in the right upper lung field. He was later found to have an invasive pulmonary fungal infection caused by multiple fungi species, including Rhizomucor, confirmed by histology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (proven infection), Penicillium decumbens diagnosed by PCR, and Aspergillus suspected from galactomannan assay (probable infection). Unfortunately, the patient's condition further worsened owing to the aggravation of leukemia, chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, and bacterial coinfection, leading to multiorgan failure and death. Here, we report a case of IFI caused by multiple fungal species that presented as Pancoast syndrome.

5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-892256

ABSTRACT

Background@#For the 2018–2019 season, the national influenza immunization program expanded to cover children aged from 6 months to 12 years in Korea. This study aimed to analyze vaccine effectiveness (VE) against influenza in children visiting the pediatric emergency room at a tertiary hospital during the 2018-2019 season. @*Methods@#Patients tested for influenza antigens from October 1st 2018 to May 31st 2019 at the pediatric emergency room of Samsung Medical Center were included. Patients' influenza antigen test results, influenza vaccination history, and underlying medical conditions were reviewed retrospectively. VE was estimated from the test-negative design study. @*Results@#Among the 2,901 visits with influenza test results 1,692 visits of 1,417 patients were included for analysis. Among these 1,417 patients, 285 (20.1%) were positive (influenza A, n = 211, 74.0%; influenza B, n = 74, 26.0%). The VE in all patients was 36.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.9 to 53.1). The VE for influenza A was 37.6% (95% CI, 12.6 to 55.5) and VE for influenza B was 24.0% (−38.5 to 58.3). The VE in the age group 6 months to 12 years was significant with a value of 35.6% (95% CI, 10.5 to 53.7); it was not statistically significant in the age group 13 to 18 years. In a multivariate logistic regression model, patients who received an influenza vaccination were less likely to get influenza infection (OR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.4 to 0.8; P = 0.001), with significant confounding factors such as age group 13 to 18 years (OR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3 to 0.8; P = 0.003) and underlying hematology-oncology disease (OR, 0.3;95% CI, 0.1 to 0.6; P = 0.002). @*Conclusion@#We report moderate effectiveness of influenza vaccination in previously healthy children aged from 6 months to 12 years in the 2018-2019 season.

6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-903140

ABSTRACT

Invasive fungal infection (IFI) is a serious threat to pediatric patients with cancer given high morbidity and mortality. We present an 18-year-old male with precursor T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia who developed Pancoast syndrome, presented with paresthesia and numbness in the right shoulder and arm during a neutropenic fever period. He was diagnosed with pneumonia in the right upper lung field. He was later found to have an invasive pulmonary fungal infection caused by multiple fungi species, including Rhizomucor, confirmed by histology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (proven infection), Penicillium decumbens diagnosed by PCR, and Aspergillus suspected from galactomannan assay (probable infection). Unfortunately, the patient's condition further worsened owing to the aggravation of leukemia, chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, and bacterial coinfection, leading to multiorgan failure and death. Here, we report a case of IFI caused by multiple fungal species that presented as Pancoast syndrome.

7.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-913287

ABSTRACT

Nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) pulmonary disease generally occurs in old people with underlying lung disease. However, unlike adults, NTM infections in children with normal immunity are rare, and they occasionally manifest as lymphadenitis. We herein present a rare case of NTM pulmonary disease in a girl who is the youngest patient reported in Korea. A 16-year-old female was brought to the hospital because of dyspnea on exertion, fever, and productive cough. The patient had bronchiectasis. She underwent Fontan operation for right isomerism, double outlet right ventricle, pulmonary stenosis, and had been taking prophylactic antibiotics for asplenia. NTM were found in the sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by acid fast bacillus (AFB) staining and culture, which were identified as Mycobacterium avium. The treatment started with azithromycin, ethambutol and rifampicin. After 6 months of treatment, respiratory symptoms improved and the sputum AFB culture became negative. She is currently on medication with above-mentioned drugs for 10 months without any adverse effects. This case suggests that NTM pulmonary disease should be suspected and properly treated especially in children and adolescents with underlying lung disease.

8.
Laboratory Medicine Online ; : 334-339, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-894968

ABSTRACT

Autosomal dominant chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (AD-CMC) is a subtype of CMC caused by gain-of-function (GOF) mutation of the signal transducer and the activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) protein. GOF mutation of STAT1 disrupts Th17 cell differentiation and causes susceptibility to candida infection in mucous membranes. Although genetic testing is crucial to diagnose AD-CMC, a simple and fast diagnostic tool is required for the management and reduction of complications associated with infection. Flow cytometry (FCM) is suggested for the measurement of intracellular phosphorylated STAT1 (pSTAT1) in a stimulated status. Here, we report the application of FCM to show the activation status of STAT signaling in a 24-year-old female patient diagnosed with AD-CMC. Compared to the controls, the patient’s T cells showed increased levels of pSTAT1 after stimulation by interferon-γ and lesser extent of inhibition caused by an inhibitor. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first evaluation of the usefulness of FCM as an alternative diagnostic and monitoring tool of GOF STAT1 in Korea.

9.
Laboratory Medicine Online ; : 250-254, 2020.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-836916

ABSTRACT

Mucormycosis is a fungal infection, which is difficult to treat due to its rapid dissemination and low susceptibility to anti-fungal agents. Peritonitis preceded by gastrointestinal mucormycosis is very rare, and only a few cases have been reported. We present a case of peritonitis and disseminated mucormycosis caused by Mucor circinelloides in an immunocompromised patient. A 59-year-old man, diagnosed with nodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma, was diagnosed with liver failure due to severe septic shock. A white, woolly cotton-like growth, which was consistent with that of Mucor species, was isolated from ascites and sputum specimens. Targeted DNA sequencing confirmed the isolate as M. circinelloides with 100% identity. Despite anti-fungal treatment, the patient died after four days. This is a rare case of peritonitis and disseminated mucormycosis that was probably preceded by gastrointestinal mucormycosis caused by M. circinelloides, as determined by molecular methods. Accurate and rapid identification of mold using molecular methods might be necessary for early treatment in critical cases, and more cases should be clinically evaluated further.

10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-811098

ABSTRACT

The recent increase in severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) cases has led to the development of the SFTS-QS kit (MiCoBioMed, Seongnam, Korea) for detecting the SFTS virus (SFTSV, now renamed Huaiyangshan banyangvirus). SFTS-QS is a qualitative real-time reverse transcription PCR assay based on lab-on-a-chip technology. We evaluated the performance of the SFTS-QS kit and compared it with that of the PowerChek SFTSV Real-time PCR kit (PowerChek; Kogene Biotech, Seoul, Korea). A total of 117 serum samples were simultaneously assayed using the SFTS-QS and PowerChek kits. Sanger sequencing targeting the S and M segments of SFTSV was performed as the reference method. The total turnaround time of the two kits was compared. The SFTS-QS results agreed with those of PowerChek with a kappa value of 0.92. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the SFTS-QS kit were both 100% (14/14 and 103/103, respectively), whereas those of the PowerChek kit were 100% (14/14) and 98.1% (101/103), respectively. The results of SFTS-QS and PowerChek were comparable; however, the SFTS-QS kit required a shorter total turnaround time. The SFTS-QS kit produced accurate and fast results and thus could serve as a useful tool for detecting SFTSV.

11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762469

ABSTRACT

The GENEDIA MTB/NTM Detection Kit (GENEDIA MTB/NTM; Green Cross Medical Science Corp., Chungbuk, Korea) is a multiplex real-time PCR assay used for differential identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). While the importance of differential identification of MTB/NTM is recognized, there is limited data on the performance of GENEDIA MTB/NTM assay to date. A total of 687 consecutive sputum specimens were cultured and analyzed with the GENEDIA MTB/NTM and GENEDIA MTB assays. Nineteen specimens (2.8%) were MTBC-positive, and 69 (10.0%) were NTM-positive based on mycobacterial culture. All specimens showed concordant results for MTBC using both assays, with a kappa value of 1.00, overall sensitivity of 63.2% (12/19), and specificity of 100% (668/668). The overall NTM sensitivity and specificity were 23.2% (16/69) and 99.7% (616/618) for GENEDIA MTB/NTM. The association between NTM-positivity using GENEDIA MTB/NTM and the diagnosis of NTM pulmonary disease was not statistically significant. In conclusion, the two real-time PCR assays showed similar diagnostic performance for MTBC detection. However, the sensitivity for NTM detection was lower than that for MTBC detection.


Subject(s)
Diagnosis , Lung Diseases , Mycobacterium tuberculosis , Mycobacterium , Nontuberculous Mycobacteria , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Sensitivity and Specificity , Sputum
12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762454

ABSTRACT

As various linezolid resistance mechanisms have been identified in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), we investigated the molecular characteristics of MRSA with elevated linezolid minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), using the VITEK 2 system (bioMérieux, Marcy-l'Étoile, France). Twenty-seven MRSA isolates from 14 patients exhibiting linezolid MICs ≥8 µg/mL were examined by broth microdilution (BMD) test as well as by sequencing for mutations in the 23S rRNA gene or ribosomal proteins (L3, L4, and L22) and the presence of the optrA, cfr, and cfr(B) genes. Of the 27 isolates, four (14.8%) from one patient were confirmed as linezolid resistant by BMD and harbored a 23S rRNA T2500A mutation. The remaining 23 were confirmed as linezolid susceptible, indicating that the linezolid-resistant results were major errors generated by VITEK 2. The most commonly detected mutation (19/27, 70.4%), L3 Gly152Asp, was detected in only linezolid-susceptible isolates. No isolates contained optrA, cfr, or cfr(B) or any L4 or L22 protein alterations. Our results show that the 23S rRNA T2500A mutation was mainly associated with linezolid resistance, while the L3 Gly152Asp mutation was not related to linezolid resistance. A confirmatory test is recommended for VITEK 2 linezolid-resistant results owing to the high probability of false resistant results.


Subject(s)
Genes, rRNA , Humans , Korea , Linezolid , Methicillin Resistance , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Ribosomal Proteins , RNA, Ribosomal, 23S
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762453

ABSTRACT

As 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-targeted sequencing can detect DNA from non-viable bacteria, it can be used to identify pathogens from clinical samples even in patients pretreated with antibiotics. We compared the results of 16S rRNA-targeted sequencing and culture for identifying bacterial species in normally sterile body fluid (NSBF): cerebrospinal, pericardial, peritoneal and pleural fluids. Over a 10-year period, a total of 312 NSBF samples were evaluated simultaneously using 16S rRNA-targeted sequencing and culture. Results were concordant in 287/312 (92.0%) samples, including 277 (88.8%) negative and 10 (3.2%) positive samples. Of the 16 sequencing-positive, culture-negative samples, eight showed clinically relevant isolates that included Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleatum, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus spp. All these samples were obtained from the patients pretreated with antibiotics. The diagnostic yield of 16S rRNA-targeted sequencing combined with culture was 11.2%, while that of culture alone was 6.1%. 16S rRNA-targeted sequencing in conjunction with culture could be useful for identifying bacteria in NSBF samples, especially when patients have been pretreated with antibiotics and when anaerobic infection is suspected.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents , Bacteria , Body Fluids , DNA , Fusobacterium nucleatum , Humans , RNA, Ribosomal, 16S , Staphylococcus , Streptococcus pneumoniae
15.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-830437

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which began in December 2019, is still ongoing in Korea, with >9,000 confirmed cases as of March 25, 2020. COVID-19 is a severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, and real-time reverse transcription-PCR is currently the most reliable diagnostic method for COVID-19 around the world. Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine and the Korea Centers for Disease Prevention and Control propose guidelines for diagnosing COVID-19 in clinical laboratories in Korea. These guidelines are based on other related domestic and international guidelines, as well as expert opinions and include the selection of test subjects, selection of specimens, diagnostic methods, interpretation of test results, and biosafety.

16.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-830432

ABSTRACT

Background@#Non-HLA antibodies, anti-angiotensin II type 1 receptor antibodies (anti-AT1R) and anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECA), are known to play a role in allograft rejection. We evaluated the role of both antibodies in predicting post-transplant outcomes in low-risk living donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) recipients. @*Methods@#In 94 consecutive LDKT recipients who were ABO compatible and negative for pre-transplant HLA donor-specific antibodies, we determined the levels of anti-AT1Rs using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the presence of AECAs using a flow cytometric endothelial cell crossmatch (ECXM) assay with pre-transplant sera. Hazard ratio (HR) was calculated to predict post-transplant outcomes. @*Results@#Pre-transplant anti-AT1Rs (≥11.5 U/mL) and AECAs were observed in 36 (38.3%) and 22 recipients (23.4%), respectively; 11 recipients had both. Pre-transplant anti-AT1Rs were a significant risk factor for the development of acute rejection (AR) (HR 2.09; P=0.018), while a positive AECA status was associated with AR or microvascular inflammation only (HR 2.47; P=0.004) throughout the follow-up period. In particular, AECA (+) recipients with ≥11.5 U/mL anti-AT1Rs exhibited a significant effect on creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (P<0.001; P=0.028), although the risk of AR was not significant. @*Conclusions@#Pre-transplant anti-AT1Rs and AECAs have independent negative effects on post-transplant outcomes in low-risk LDKT recipients. Assessment of both antibodies would be helpful in stratifying the pre-transplant immunological risk, even in low-risk LDKT recipients.

17.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-785340

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: While there is an urgent need for diagnosis and therapeutic intervention in patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs), current genetic tests have drawbacks. We retrospectively reviewed the usefulness of flow cytometry (FCM) as a quick tool for immunophenotyping and functional assays in patients suspected to have PIDs at a single tertiary care institute.METHODS: Between January 2001 and June 2018, patients suspected of having PIDs were subjected to FCM tests, including lymphocyte subset analysis, detection of surface- or intracellular-target proteins, and functional analysis of immune cells, at Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. The genetic diagnosis was performed using Sanger or diagnostic exome sequencing.RESULTS: Of 60 patients diagnosed with definite or probable PID according to the European Society of Immune Deficiencies criteria, 24 patients were provided with useful information about immunological dysfunction after initial FCM testing. In 10 patients, the PID diagnosis was based on abnormal findings in FCM testing without genetic tests. The FCM findings provided strong evidence for the diagnosis of severe combined immunodeficiency (n = 6), X-linked chronic granulomatous diseases (CGD) (n = 6), leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 (n = 3), X-linked agammaglobulinemia (n = 11), autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-FASLG (n = 1), and familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis type 2 (n = 1), and probable evidence for autosomal recessive-CGD (n = 2), autosomal dominant-hyper-immunoglobulin E (IgE)-syndrome (n = 1), and STAT1 gain-of-function mutation (n = 1). In PIDs derived from PIK3CD (n = 2), LRBA (n = 2), and CTLA4 mutations (n = 3), the FCM test provided useful evidence of immune abnormalities and a tool for treatment monitoring.CONCLUSIONS: The initial application of FCM, particularly with known protein targets on immune cells, would facilitate the timely diagnosis of PIDs and thus would support clinical decisions and improve the clinical outcome.


Subject(s)
Agammaglobulinemia , Diagnosis , Exome , Flow Cytometry , Genetic Testing , Granulomatous Disease, Chronic , Humans , Immunophenotyping , Korea , Leukocytes , Lymphocyte Subsets , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic , Phenotype , Retrospective Studies , Seoul , Severe Combined Immunodeficiency , Tertiary Healthcare
18.
Laboratory Medicine Online ; : 334-339, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-902672

ABSTRACT

Autosomal dominant chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (AD-CMC) is a subtype of CMC caused by gain-of-function (GOF) mutation of the signal transducer and the activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) protein. GOF mutation of STAT1 disrupts Th17 cell differentiation and causes susceptibility to candida infection in mucous membranes. Although genetic testing is crucial to diagnose AD-CMC, a simple and fast diagnostic tool is required for the management and reduction of complications associated with infection. Flow cytometry (FCM) is suggested for the measurement of intracellular phosphorylated STAT1 (pSTAT1) in a stimulated status. Here, we report the application of FCM to show the activation status of STAT signaling in a 24-year-old female patient diagnosed with AD-CMC. Compared to the controls, the patient’s T cells showed increased levels of pSTAT1 after stimulation by interferon-γ and lesser extent of inhibition caused by an inhibitor. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first evaluation of the usefulness of FCM as an alternative diagnostic and monitoring tool of GOF STAT1 in Korea.

19.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 670-678, 2020.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-833325

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The diagnosis of pulmonary fungal infections is challenging due to the difficulty of obtaining sufficient specimens. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) needle rinse fluid has become an emerging diagnostic material. This study evaluated the role of routine fungal culture from EBUS-TBNA needle rinse fluid, in addition to histopathologic examination and fungal culture of EBUS-TBNA core tissue, in the diagnosis of pulmonary fungal infections. @*Materials and Methods@#Among patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA, those with results for at least one of three tests (histopathologic examination, fungal culture of EBUS-TBNA core tissue or needle rinse fluid) were included. Patients with a positive test were divided into two groups (clinical fungal infection and suspected fungal contamination) according to their clinical assessment and therapeutic response to antifungal. @*Results@#Of 6072 patients, 41 (0.7%) had positive fungal tests and 9 (22%) were diagnosed as clinical fungal infection. Of the 5222 patients who were evaluated using a fungal culture from EBUS-TBNA needle rinse fluid, 35 (0.7%) had positive results. However, only 4 out of 35 (11.4%) were classified as clinical fungal infection. Positive results were determined in 4 of the 68 (5.9%) evaluated by a fungal culture of EBUS-TBNA core tissue, and all were diagnosed as clinical fungal infection. @*Conclusion@#Routine fungal culture of EBUS-TBNA needle rinse fluid is not useful due to the low incidence of fungal infection and high rate of contamination. However, fungal culture of EBUS-TBNA core tissue and needle rinse fluid should be considered in patients with clinically suspected fungal infection.

20.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-760484

ABSTRACT

Actinotignum schaalii is an emerging uropathogen; however, routine culture protocols and usual phenotypic methods do not allow for easy detection and identification. Herein, we report the first Korean case of urinary tract infection caused by A. schaalii in a 79-year-old patient with prostate cancer. A gram-positive rod bacterium was isolated from the patient's urine after 2 days of culture and identified as A. schaalii using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry and DNA target sequencing.


Subject(s)
Aged , DNA , Humans , Mass Spectrometry , Prostatic Neoplasms , Urinary Tract Infections , Urinary Tract
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