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1.
Journal of Bacteriology and Virology ; : 263-272, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-898904

ABSTRACT

Feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1) causes respiratory and ocular disease in cats.Although isolates of FHV-1 circulating in cats have been reported worldwide, Korean FHV-1 isolates and their features have not been reported thus far. We aimed to investigate the biological and molecular characterization of two FHV-1 isolates based on the nucleotide sequence of thymidine kinase (TK) and glycoprotein B (gB) gene. In total, 48 samples from 12 cats were prepared for virus isolation.For the diagnosis, virus isolation, indirect fluorescence assay (IFA), electron microscopy (EM), and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and for the molecular characterization, cloning and sequencing were used. Based on many methods such as virus isolation with specific cytopathic effects, IFA, EM, and PCR, two isolates were confirmed as FHV-1 and they showed the highest viral titer (108.3 to 108.5 TCID50 /mL) in the Crandell–Rees Feline Kidney cells at 48 h after inoculation, but did not grow in MDCK and Vero cells. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the full TK and gB gene of FHV191071 and FHV191072 isolates were determined and compared with those of other herpesvirus strains. Two isolates possessed the same nucleotide sequences belonging to FHV-1 group and had the highest similarity (99.9%) with the KANS-02 strain, which was isolated from shelter in USA in 2016. Two isolates were confirmed as FHV-1 and they will be a useful basic resource for evaluating current FHV-1 vaccine and developing diagnostic tools.

2.
Korean Journal of Veterinary Research ; : 195-202, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-902549

ABSTRACT

Feline calicivirus (FCV) infection results in a common upper respiratory disease associated with oral ulceration in cats.Although FCV infection has been reported in cats worldwide, the biologic and genetic features of South Korean FCV are unclear. We aimed to investigate the biological and genetic features of South Korean FCV isolates. Crandell-Rees feline kidney (CRFK) cells were used to isolate FCV from 58 organ homogenate samples. The FCV isolates were confirmed by cytopathic effects, immunofluorescence, electron microscopy, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays. Viral genetic analysis was carried out with VP2 gene and complete genomes of FCVs. Five viruses propagated in CRFK cells were confirmed to be FCVs. The FCV17D283 isolate showed the highest viral titer of 107.2TCID50 /mL at 36 h post-inoculation. Korean FCV isolates did not grow well in Vero, BHK-21, A72, or Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. The FCV17D03 and FCV17D283 isolates had the highest genetic similarity (80.1% and 86.9%) with the UTCVM-H1 and 14Q315 strains, which were isolated in the United States and South Korea in 1995 and 2014, respectively. We isolated five FCVs from cats and detected important genetic differences among them. FCV isolates did not show any virulent effects in mice.

3.
Korean Journal of Veterinary Research ; : 195-202, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-894845

ABSTRACT

Feline calicivirus (FCV) infection results in a common upper respiratory disease associated with oral ulceration in cats.Although FCV infection has been reported in cats worldwide, the biologic and genetic features of South Korean FCV are unclear. We aimed to investigate the biological and genetic features of South Korean FCV isolates. Crandell-Rees feline kidney (CRFK) cells were used to isolate FCV from 58 organ homogenate samples. The FCV isolates were confirmed by cytopathic effects, immunofluorescence, electron microscopy, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays. Viral genetic analysis was carried out with VP2 gene and complete genomes of FCVs. Five viruses propagated in CRFK cells were confirmed to be FCVs. The FCV17D283 isolate showed the highest viral titer of 107.2TCID50 /mL at 36 h post-inoculation. Korean FCV isolates did not grow well in Vero, BHK-21, A72, or Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. The FCV17D03 and FCV17D283 isolates had the highest genetic similarity (80.1% and 86.9%) with the UTCVM-H1 and 14Q315 strains, which were isolated in the United States and South Korea in 1995 and 2014, respectively. We isolated five FCVs from cats and detected important genetic differences among them. FCV isolates did not show any virulent effects in mice.

4.
Journal of Bacteriology and Virology ; : 263-272, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-891200

ABSTRACT

Feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1) causes respiratory and ocular disease in cats.Although isolates of FHV-1 circulating in cats have been reported worldwide, Korean FHV-1 isolates and their features have not been reported thus far. We aimed to investigate the biological and molecular characterization of two FHV-1 isolates based on the nucleotide sequence of thymidine kinase (TK) and glycoprotein B (gB) gene. In total, 48 samples from 12 cats were prepared for virus isolation.For the diagnosis, virus isolation, indirect fluorescence assay (IFA), electron microscopy (EM), and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and for the molecular characterization, cloning and sequencing were used. Based on many methods such as virus isolation with specific cytopathic effects, IFA, EM, and PCR, two isolates were confirmed as FHV-1 and they showed the highest viral titer (108.3 to 108.5 TCID50 /mL) in the Crandell–Rees Feline Kidney cells at 48 h after inoculation, but did not grow in MDCK and Vero cells. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the full TK and gB gene of FHV191071 and FHV191072 isolates were determined and compared with those of other herpesvirus strains. Two isolates possessed the same nucleotide sequences belonging to FHV-1 group and had the highest similarity (99.9%) with the KANS-02 strain, which was isolated from shelter in USA in 2016. Two isolates were confirmed as FHV-1 and they will be a useful basic resource for evaluating current FHV-1 vaccine and developing diagnostic tools.

5.
Korean Journal of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology ; : 81-88, 1998.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-199972

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cancer is the second cause of childhood death following accident, and leukemia is the most frequent childhood cancer in Korea. For the desirable control of childhood leukemia, of which the mortality is still high, the basic data for the incidence has a great importance. This is the second report from the data during 1991~1995 following the first one that analyzed the data from 328 cases of childhood leukemia during 1981~1990 in the same area, Pusan city, Korea. METHODS: The data were obtained from 138 new cases(84 males and 54 females from 0 to 15 years old) of childhood leukemia who had been living in the city of Pusan and were admitted to the 4 university hospitals and 11 general hospitals from 1991 to 1995. The cases were confirmed by CBC and bone marrow examination. RESULTS: The crude annual incidence rate per 100,000 population varied 1.50~5.30, 2.59~6.00 and 1.58~2.61 in the age group of 0~4 years, 5~9 years and 10~14 years, respectively. The standardized annual incidence rate per 100,000 population varied from 2.05 to 3.46(male 2.96~4.89, female 0.98~3.57). Sex ratio(male to female) was 1.58:1, 1.44:1, and 1.82:1 in total cases, ALL and AML, respectively, while incalculable in CML. By the major types of childhood leukemia, the cases were composed of 105 ALL (76.1%), 31 AML(22.5%), 2 CML(1.4%). CONCLUSION: It was concluded that the annual incidence rate of childhood leukemia per 100,000 population in Pusan city during 1991~1995 was similar to that of previous report during 1981~1990, while the proportion of ALL had tendency to increase up to that of United States, in contrast to the low proportions of ALL in the previous reports.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Male , Bone Marrow Examination , Hospitals, General , Hospitals, University , Incidence , Korea , Leukemia , Mortality , United States
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