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1.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 145-154, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-968255

ABSTRACT

Objective@#We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of EmboTrap II in terms of first-pass recanalization and to determine whether it could yield favorable outcomes. @*Materials and Methods@#In this multicenter, prospective study, we consecutively enrolled patients who underwent mechanical thrombectomy using EmboTrap II as a front-line device. The primary outcome was the first pass effect (FPE) rate defined by modified Thrombolysis In Cerebral Infarction (mTICI) grade 2c or 3 by the first pass of EmboTrap II. In addition, modified FPE (mFPE; mTICI grade 2b–3 by the first pass of EmboTrap II), successful recanalization (final mTICI grade 2b–3), and clinical outcomes were assessed. We also analyzed the effect of FPE on a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 0–2 at 3 months. @*Results@#Two hundred-ten patients (mean age ± standard deviation, 73.3 ± 11.4 years; male, 55.7%) were included. Ninetynine patients (47.1%) had FPE, and mFPE was achieved in 150 (71.4%) patients. Successful recanalization was achieved in 191 (91.0%) patients. Among them, 164 (85.9%) patients underwent successful recanalization by exclusively using EmboTrap II. The time from groin puncture to FPE was 25.0 minutes (interquartile range, 17.0–35.0 minutes). Procedure-related complications were observed in seven (3.3%) patients. Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage developed in 14 (6.7%) patients. One hundred twenty-three (58.9% of 209 completely followed) patients had an mRS score of 0–2. Sixteen (7.7% of 209) patients died during the follow-up period. Patients who had successful recanalization with FPE were four times more likely to have an mRS score of 0–2 than those who had successful recanalization without FPE (adjusted odds ratio, 4.13;95% confidence interval, 1.59–10.8; p = 0.004). @*Conclusion@#Mechanical thrombectomy using the front-line EmboTrap II is effective and safe. In particular, FPE rates were high. Achieving FPE was important for an mRS score of 0–2, even in patients with successful recanalization.

2.
Journal of the Korean Medical Association ; : 258-266, 2023.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-977029

ABSTRACT

Sleep is vital for adolescents’ physical and emotional development; however, sleep disturbances and disorders frequently occur in this age group and affect their health and well-being. In this review, we investigated the prevalence, etiology, diagnosis, clinical characteristics, and treatment of sleep disorders observed among adolescents.Current Concepts: The diagnostic criteria for insomnia disorder among adolescents include difficulties in falling asleep, maintaining sleep, or waking up too early and feeling unrefreshed, which are observed at least 3 days per week over 3 or more months. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia typically includes identifying and addressing negative thoughts and behaviors associated with sleep and establishing a consistent sleep-wake schedule. Delayed sleep phase syndrome is diagnosed in individuals in whom sleep onset and wake times are persistently delayed by 2 or more hours beyond the desired or existing sleep schedule, which leads to excessive daytime sleepiness or impaired functioning. Behavioral interventions comprise sleep hygiene education, relaxation techniques, and phototherapy. Symptoms such as pronounced snoring, apnea observed by others, and gasping or pauses in breathing during sleep may indicate sleep apnea. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy is an effective treatment strategy for sleep apnea. A history of excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy suggests narcolepsy, and treatment options include pharmacotherapy, behavior modification, and lifestyle adjustments. Restless leg syndrome treatments include behavioral therapy, as well as anticonvulsant and dopamine receptor agonist administration.Discussion and Conclusion: Addressing sleep disorders is important to promote optimal health and well-being of adolescents and requires a multidisciplinary approach. Early detection, accurate diagnosis, and individualized treatment improve sleep and overall health outcomes and promote academic and social success.

3.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : e46-2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-915503

ABSTRACT

Background@#Sleep disturbances are common in children and adolescents. However, they are rarely diagnosed and treated because parents, who often report the symptoms, may fail to notice the problems. Factors that can affect parent-child discrepancy include child’s diagnosis, parent’s occupation, and child’s sex. The current study retrospectively analyzed the effect of these factors on parent-child discrepancies of sleep disturbance scores. @*Methods@#Data for sleep-related items in Youth Self-Report (YSR) and Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) from 2014 to 2020 August in South Korea were collected from psychiatric outpatient clinics at Konkuk University Medical Center and Soonchunhyang University Hospital. @*Results@#A three-way analysis of variance revealed main effect of diagnosis type and interaction between diagnosis type and mother’s occupation. Discrepancies were greater for mood and anxiety disorders compared to conduct-related disorder. Interaction effect revealed greater discrepancies in mood disorders for reports completed by working mothers compared to homemaker mothers. @*Conclusion@#The results of this study emphasize the need to explore with caution the selfreported sleep disturbances in adolescents, especially in those with mood disorders. The results also suggest that mother’s occupation should be taken into account when evaluating sleep reports of parents and adolescents.

4.
Psychiatry Investigation ; : 259-267, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-926897

ABSTRACT

Objective@#The relationship between benzodiazepine use and cognitive decline in insomnia patients has been reported, but still conflicting. Thus, we tried to determine whether long-term exposure of benzodiazepine might be associated with changes of cognition and electroencephalography (EEG) findings in patients with chronic insomnia. @*Methods@#Insomniacs using benzodiazepines (n=29), drug-free insomniacs (n=27), and age- and sex-matched controls (n=28) were recruited. Neurocognitive function tested with Korean version of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Packet Neuropsychological Assessment Battery, quantitative EEG in awake state, and information of benzodiazepine usage were obtained. @*Results@#Drug-free insomniacs reported more severe symptoms than insomniacs using benzodiazepine (p<0.001). Insomniacs using benzodiazepine showed a decrease of executive function in Trail Making Test A than drug-free insomniacs and controls (0.73±0.66 vs. 1.27±0.38 vs. 1.09±0.47, p<0.001) and in categorical fluency than drug-free insomniacs (-0.01±0.99 vs. 1.26±0.97, p=0.002). However, such decrease of executive function was not proportional to daily dose or cumulative dose of benzodiazepine. The EEG was not significantly different between insomniacs using benzodiazepine and drug-free insomniacs, while EEG of insomniacs showed low relative theta power in frontal and parietal regions but high relative beta power in frontal region than that of controls. @*Conclusion@#Benzodiazepine users with chronic insomnia showed an impairment of executive function compared to drug-free insomniacs and controls although they showed relatively decreased severity of insomnia symptoms. Chronic insomniacs showed a hyper-arousal manifestation in front-parietal region of brain regardless of benzodiazepine exposure.

5.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 255-261, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-875611

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#This study aimed to examine the inter-method reliability and volumetric differences between NeuroQuant (NQ) and Freesurfer (FS) using T1 volume imaging sequence with different slice thicknesses in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). @*Materials and Methods@#This retrospective study enrolled 80 patients diagnosed with MCI at our memory clinic. NQ and FS were used for volumetric analysis of three-dimensional T1-weighted images with slice thickness of 1 and 1.2 mm. Inter-method reliability was measured with Pearson correlation coefficient (r), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and effect size (ES). @*Results@#Overall, NQ volumes were larger than FS volumes in several locations: whole brain (0.78%), cortical gray matter (5.34%), and white matter (2.68%). Volume measures by NQ and FS showed good-to-excellent ICCs with both 1 and 1.2 mm slice thickness (ICC=0.75–0.97, ES=-1.0–0.73 vs. ICC=0.78–0.96, ES=-0.9–0.77, respectively), except for putamen, pallidum, thalamus, and total intracranial volumes. The ICCs in all locations, except the putamen and cerebellum, were slightly higher with a slice thickness of 1 mm compared to those of 1.2 mm. @*Conclusion@#Inter-method reliability between NQ and FS was good-to-excellent in most regions with improvement with a 1-mm slice thickness. This finding indicates that the potential effects of slice thickness should be considered when performing volumetric measurements for cognitive impairment.

6.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 405-414, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-875285

ABSTRACT

Objective@#To compare two clinically available MR volumetry software, NeuroQuant® (NQ) and Inbrain® (IB), and examine the inter-method reliabilities and differences between them. @*Materials and Methods@#This study included 172 subjects (age range, 55–88 years; mean age, 71.2 years), comprising 45 normal healthy subjects, 85 patients with mild cognitive impairment, and 42 patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were analyzed with IB and NQ. Mean differences were compared with the paired t test. Inter-method reliability was evaluated with Pearson’s correlation coefficients and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Effect sizes were also obtained to document the standardized mean differences. @*Results@#The paired t test showed significant volume differences in most regions except for the amygdala between the two methods. Nevertheless, inter-method measurements between IB and NQ showed good to excellent reliability (0.72 < r < 0.96, 0.83 < ICC < 0.98) except for the pallidum, which showed poor reliability (left: r = 0.03, ICC = 0.06; right: r = -0.05, ICC = -0.09). For the measurements of effect size, volume differences were large in most regions (0.05 < r < 6.15). The effect size was the largest in the pallidum and smallest in the cerebellum. @*Conclusion@#Comparisons between IB and NQ showed significantly different volume measurements with large effect sizes.However, they showed good to excellent inter-method reliability in volumetric measurements for all brain regions, with the exception of the pallidum. Clinicians using these commercial software should take into consideration that different volume measurements could be obtained depending on the software used.

7.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : e30-2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-899989

ABSTRACT

Background@#This study aimed to determine if sleep disturbances may mediate the relationship between panic symptoms and depression in patients with panic disorder (PD). @*Methods@#Electronic medical records were retrospectively reviewed for 110 consecutive patients with diagnosed PD in an outpatient clinic between October 2018 and December 2019. Measurements include the PD Severity Scale, Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Statistical analyses were performed to assess any potential relationship between PD, insomnia and depression. @*Results@#Of the PD patients, 88 (80%) and 89 (80.9%) had comorbid depression (BDI-II ≥ 14) and insomnia (Korean version of the ISI ≥ 8), respectively. In a mediation model using insomnia as the mediating variable, the total effect of panic symptom severity on depression was significant (t = 7.23, P < 0.001). There were significant effects of panic symptoms on insomnia (t = 4.62,P < 0.001) and of insomnia on depression (t = 6.69, P < 0.001). The main effect of panic symptom severity on depression was also significant, after controlling for the effect of insomnia (t = 5.10, P < 0.001), suggesting partial mediation. @*Conclusion@#Both depressive symptoms and insomnia are common in patients with PD and depression was partially mediated by insomnia in these patients. These results suggest that an intervention for insomnia in patients with PD might help prevent the development of depression.

8.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : e30-2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-892285

ABSTRACT

Background@#This study aimed to determine if sleep disturbances may mediate the relationship between panic symptoms and depression in patients with panic disorder (PD). @*Methods@#Electronic medical records were retrospectively reviewed for 110 consecutive patients with diagnosed PD in an outpatient clinic between October 2018 and December 2019. Measurements include the PD Severity Scale, Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Statistical analyses were performed to assess any potential relationship between PD, insomnia and depression. @*Results@#Of the PD patients, 88 (80%) and 89 (80.9%) had comorbid depression (BDI-II ≥ 14) and insomnia (Korean version of the ISI ≥ 8), respectively. In a mediation model using insomnia as the mediating variable, the total effect of panic symptom severity on depression was significant (t = 7.23, P < 0.001). There were significant effects of panic symptoms on insomnia (t = 4.62,P < 0.001) and of insomnia on depression (t = 6.69, P < 0.001). The main effect of panic symptom severity on depression was also significant, after controlling for the effect of insomnia (t = 5.10, P < 0.001), suggesting partial mediation. @*Conclusion@#Both depressive symptoms and insomnia are common in patients with PD and depression was partially mediated by insomnia in these patients. These results suggest that an intervention for insomnia in patients with PD might help prevent the development of depression.

9.
Korean Journal of Psychosomatic Medicine ; : 34-41, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-918172

ABSTRACT

Objectives@#:The purpose of this study is to investigate the characteristics of depressive patients who admitted to general hospital. We examined the clinical characteristics of patients who were referred to the Department of Psychiatry as depressive symptoms, according to the type of consultation request, and comparing ‘with re-consultation’ and ‘without re-consultation’ groups. @*Methods@#:We performed a retrospective chart review of 4,966 inpatients who were referred to the Department of Psychiatry from August 2005 to December 2011. @*Results@#:For about 6 years, among the inpatients referred for psychiatric consultation, a total of 647 patients were referred for depressive symptoms, accounting for 13.82% of the total consultations. The average age of depressive patients was 58.6 years, which was higher than the average of 56.4 years of overall patients. Among the depressive patients, 275 patients were included in ‘with re-consultation’ group and there was no statistically significant difference when comparing ‘with re-consultation’ group and ‘without re-consultation’ group. How-ever, there was a difference in the tendency of the two groups in the type of consultation request. ‘With re-consultation’ group was in the order of frequency of consultation type 3-2-1, whereas the ‘without re-consultation’ group was in the order of frequency of consultation type 2-3-1. @*Conclusions@#:The group of inpatients who were referred for depressive symptoms in general hospital showed the largest proportion of the group of patients referred to the Department of Psychiatry. ‘With re-consultation’ group had a higher rate of re-consultation due to the occurrence of new symptoms after hospitalization compared to ‘without re-consultation’ group. Therefore, doctors in each department and psychiatrists should pay attention to the depressive symptoms of inpatients and actively discuss treatment plans to improve the quality of medical services, identify risk factors, and make efforts to intervene early if necessary.

10.
Psychiatry Investigation ; : 896-901, 2020.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-832612

ABSTRACT

Objective@#This study aimed to investigate the potential correlation between baseline characteristics of individuals visiting an emergency room for a suicide attempt and subsequent psychiatric outpatient treatment adherence. @*Methods@#Medical records of 525 subjects, who visited an emergency room at a university-affiliated hospital for a suicide attempt between January 2017 and December 2018 were retrospectively reviewed. Potential associations between baseline characteristics and psychiatric outpatient visitation were statistically analyzed. @*Results@#107 out of 525 individuals (20.4%) who attempted suicide visited an outpatient clinic after the initial emergency room visit. Several factors (e.g., sober during suicide attempt, college degree, practicing religion, psychiatric treatment history) were significantly related to better psychiatric outpatient follow-up. @*Conclusion@#Several demographic and clinical factors predicted outpatient adherence following a suicide attempt. Therefore, additional attention should be given to suicide attempters who are at the risk of non-adherence by practitioners in the emergency room.

11.
Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society ; : 35-45, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-765322

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe our experiences with a fully equipped high-end digital subtraction angiography (DSA) system within a hybrid operating room (OR). METHODS: A single-plane DSA system with 3-dimensional rotational angiography, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), and real-time navigation software was used in our hybrid OR. Between April 2014 and January 2018, 191 sessions of cerebrovascular procedures were performed in our hybrid OR. After the retrospective review of all cases, the procedures were categorized into three subcategorical procedures : combined endovascular and surgical procedure, complementary rescue procedure during intervention and surgery, and frameless stereotaxic operation. RESULTS: Forty-nine of 191 procedures were performed using hybrid techniques. Four cases of blood blister aneurysms and a ruptured posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm were treated using bypass surgery and endovascular trapping. Eight cases of ruptured aneurysm with intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) were treated by partial embolization and surgical clipping. Six cases of ruptured arteriovenous malformation with ICH were treated by Onyx embolization of nidus and subsequent surgical removal of nidus and ICH. Two (5.4%) of the 37 cases of pre-mature rupture during clipping were secured by endovascular coil embolization. In one (0.8%) complicated case of 103 intra-arterial thrombectomy procedures, emergency surgical embolectomy with bypass surgery was performed. In 27 cases of ICH, frameless stereotaxic hematoma aspiration was performed using XperGuide® system (Philips Medical Systems, Best, the Netherlands). All procedures were performed in single sessions without any procedural complications. CONCLUSION: Hybrid OR with a fully equipped DSA system could provide precise and safe treatment strategies for cerebrovascular diseases. Especially, we could suggest a strategy to cope flexibly in complex lesions or unexpected situations in hybrid OR. CBCT with real-time navigation software could augment the usefulness of hybrid OR.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Aneurysm, Ruptured , Angiography , Angiography, Digital Subtraction , Arteries , Arteriovenous Malformations , Blister , Cerebrovascular Disorders , Cone-Beam Computed Tomography , Embolectomy , Embolization, Therapeutic , Emergencies , Hematoma , Intracranial Hemorrhages , Operating Rooms , Retrospective Studies , Rupture , Surgical Instruments , Thrombectomy
12.
Psychiatry Investigation ; : 199-205, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-760917

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to develop the clinical guideline for headache by the systematic review and synthesis of existing evidence-based guidelines. The purpose of developing the guideline was to improve the appropriateness of diagnosis and treatment of headache disorder, and consequently, to improve patients’ pain control and quality of life. The guideline broadly covers the differential diagnosis and treatment of tension-type headache, migraine, cluster headache, and medication-overuse headache. METHODS: This is a methodological study based on the ADAPTE methodology, including a systematic review of the literature, quality assessment of the guidelines using the Appraisal of Clinical Guidelines for REsearch & Evaluation II (AGREE II) Instrument, as well as an external review using a Delphi technique. The inclusion criteria for systematic search were as follows: topic-relevant, up-to-date guidelines including evidence from within 5 years, evidence-based guidelines, guidelines written in English or Korean, and guidelines issued by academic institutions or government agencies. RESULTS: We selected five guidelines and conducted their quality assessment using the AGREE II Instrument. As a result, one guideline was found to be eligible for adaptation. For 13 key questions, a total of 39 recommendations were proposed with the grading system and revised using the nominal group technique. CONCLUSION: Recommendations should be applied to actual clinical sites to achieve the ultimate goal of this guideline; therefore, follow-up activities, such as monitoring of guideline usage and assessment of applicability of the recommendations, should be performed in the future. Further assessment of the effectiveness of the guideline in Korea is needed.


Subject(s)
Cluster Headache , Delphi Technique , Diagnosis , Diagnosis, Differential , Follow-Up Studies , Government Agencies , Headache Disorders , Headache , Korea , Methods , Migraine Disorders , Quality of Life , Tension-Type Headache
13.
Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society ; : 35-45, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-788751

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe our experiences with a fully equipped high-end digital subtraction angiography (DSA) system within a hybrid operating room (OR).METHODS: A single-plane DSA system with 3-dimensional rotational angiography, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), and real-time navigation software was used in our hybrid OR. Between April 2014 and January 2018, 191 sessions of cerebrovascular procedures were performed in our hybrid OR. After the retrospective review of all cases, the procedures were categorized into three subcategorical procedures : combined endovascular and surgical procedure, complementary rescue procedure during intervention and surgery, and frameless stereotaxic operation.RESULTS: Forty-nine of 191 procedures were performed using hybrid techniques. Four cases of blood blister aneurysms and a ruptured posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm were treated using bypass surgery and endovascular trapping. Eight cases of ruptured aneurysm with intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) were treated by partial embolization and surgical clipping. Six cases of ruptured arteriovenous malformation with ICH were treated by Onyx embolization of nidus and subsequent surgical removal of nidus and ICH. Two (5.4%) of the 37 cases of pre-mature rupture during clipping were secured by endovascular coil embolization. In one (0.8%) complicated case of 103 intra-arterial thrombectomy procedures, emergency surgical embolectomy with bypass surgery was performed. In 27 cases of ICH, frameless stereotaxic hematoma aspiration was performed using XperGuide® system (Philips Medical Systems, Best, the Netherlands). All procedures were performed in single sessions without any procedural complications.CONCLUSION: Hybrid OR with a fully equipped DSA system could provide precise and safe treatment strategies for cerebrovascular diseases. Especially, we could suggest a strategy to cope flexibly in complex lesions or unexpected situations in hybrid OR. CBCT with real-time navigation software could augment the usefulness of hybrid OR.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Aneurysm, Ruptured , Angiography , Angiography, Digital Subtraction , Arteries , Arteriovenous Malformations , Blister , Cerebrovascular Disorders , Cone-Beam Computed Tomography , Embolectomy , Embolization, Therapeutic , Emergencies , Hematoma , Intracranial Hemorrhages , Operating Rooms , Retrospective Studies , Rupture , Surgical Instruments , Thrombectomy
14.
Psychiatry Investigation ; : 71-79, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-741916

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The present study compared cancer-related fatigue (CRF) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) using multidimensional measurements with the aim of better understanding characteristics and exploring markers of two similar fatigue syndromes. METHODS: Twenty-five patients with CRF and twenty patients with CFS completed questionnaires, including the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Additionally, levels of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), heart rate variability (HRV), and electroencephalography (EEG) were obtained. Neurocognitive functioning was also evaluated. RESULTS: Both groups showed comparable levels of psychological variables, including fatigue. Compared to CFS subjects, CRF patients had significantly higher hs-CRP levels and a reduced HRV-index. The within-group analyses revealed that the FSS score of the CRF group was significantly related to scores on the HADS-anxiety, HADS-depression, and PSQI scales. In the CFS group, FSS scores were significantly associated with scores on the PSS and the absolute delta, theta, and alpha powers in frontal EEG. CONCLUSION: Findings indicate that different pathophysiological mechanisms underlie CFS and CRF. Inflammatory marker and HRV may be potential biomarkers for distinguishing two fatigue syndromes and frontal EEG parameters may be quantitative biomarkers for CFS.


Subject(s)
Humans , Anxiety , Biomarkers , C-Reactive Protein , Depression , Electrocardiography , Electroencephalography , Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic , Fatigue , Heart Rate , Weights and Measures
15.
Sleep Medicine and Psychophysiology ; : 104-110, 2019.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-918784

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES@#Insomnia patients who visited the psychiatric outpatient of a university department, were divided into those patients with insomnia alone and those with depression or anxiety disorder, along with insomnia. The study analyzed their demographic characteristics and the differences in State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) results among the patient groups.@*METHODS@#Patients who visited the psychiatric department in Konkuk University hospital from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2018. If they were diagnosed with insomnia disorder based on DSM IV-TR and had undergone STAI, their electronic records were retrospectively analyzed. Based on the records, the patients were classified into those with insomnia disorder only, those with insomnia and anxiety disorder, and those with insomnia and depressive disorder. This study analyzed the demographic characteristics and STAI results of each group, and compared the differences among those groups.@*RESULTS@#During the period, 99 of 329 insomnia disorder patients who had performed STAI were diagnosed with depressive concurrent disorder and 61 with concurrent anxiety disorder. There was no difference in demographic characteristics of age and sex ratio among the three patient groups, and all had greater than 70% proportions of patients aged from 50s to 70s (71.8%, 77.1%, and 73.8% respectively). The average scores of STAI-I were 51.85 ± 10.15 for the patients with anxiety disorders and 54.18 ± 10.32 for those with depressive disorders, both of which were higher than the score of the patients with insomnia alone (44.55 ± 8.89). However, the score difference was not statically significant between the anxiety and depression groups. Similarly, in the STAI-II comparison, the averages of patients with anxiety or depressive disorders along with insomnia were 49.98 ± 8.31 and 53.19 ± 10.13 respectively, which were higher than that of the insomnia only group (42.71 ± 8.84), but there was no significant difference between the anxiety and depressive disorder groups.@*CONCLUSION@#Although there were no differences in demographic data between the patients with insomnia only and those with accompanying depressive or anxiety disorder, the STAI-I and II scores were lower in the insomnia only group. In the future, it is necessary to consider other demographic characteristics including comorbidities and to conduct similar analyses with a larger sample.

16.
Journal of Cerebrovascular and Endovascular Neurosurgery ; : 181-186, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-717042

ABSTRACT

Technical advances with devices such as catheters, balloons, and stents have widened the indications for endovascular coiling for unfavorable aneurysms. The authors report two cases of coil embolization for a wide-neck bifurcated aneurysm with anterograde horizontal stenting via microcatheter looping. Two women, aged 56 and 38 years, respectively, had an undertall- and overwide-neck aneurysm with bifurcated branches at the basilar bifurcation and middle cerebral bifurcation, respectively. The delivery microcatheter was steamed so that it could be looped deliberately to the opposite vessel. The enterprise stent was first anchored to the vessel of the posterior cerebral artery on one side. The remaining portion was spanned into a looped microcatheter to the opposite branch while pushing the stent. The Neuroform Atlas stent was passed directly through the looped segment of the microcatheter at the M2 branch and spanned horizontally by unsheathing. Under horizontal stenting, complete coil embolization was achieved without immediate or delayed complications in both cases. This novel technique presents a viable option for stent-assisted coiling within an optimal anatomy.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Aneurysm , Catheters , Embolization, Therapeutic , Intracranial Aneurysm , Posterior Cerebral Artery , Steam , Stents
17.
Psychiatry Investigation ; : 884-890, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-717006

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Previous findings suggest that hand movement laterality is reversed during sleep. The present study aimed to verify this phenomenon and evaluate whether the extent of reversal is correlated with the severity of sleep apnea. METHODS: A total of 184 participants (mean age: 44.5±13.0 years; 81.5% males) wore actigraphs on both hands during sleep, and nocturnal polysomnography was simultaneously performed. RESULTS: Actigraphic indices of hand movement were significantly higher for the left hand than those for the right hand (p < 0.001), including total activity score, mean activity score, mean score in active periods and fragmentation index. Additionally, calculated differences between the fragmentation index for the left versus right hands were significantly correlated with the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI, r=0.149, p=0.032). The AHI was not significantly correlated with differences in hand movement between both hands movement assessed by total activity score (r=0.004, p=0.957), mean activity score (r=0.011, p=0.876), mean score in active periods (r=-0.080, p=0.255). CONCLUSION: More severe symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea was associated with larger degree of hand movement reversal at night. This result support the theory that homeostatic deactivation occurs in the dominant hemisphere during sleep.


Subject(s)
Humans , Hand , Polysomnography , Sleep Apnea Syndromes , Sleep Apnea, Obstructive
18.
Psychiatry Investigation ; : 390-395, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-714294

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the clinical course of restless legs syndrome (RLS) and potential risk factors for the persistence of RLS symptoms after iron normalization in women with RLS and low serum ferritin (<50 μg/L). METHODS: We reviewed 39 women with RLS and iron deficiency, who achieved iron normalization after oral iron replacement for three months. Risk factors contributing to symptom persistence were estimated by logistic regression analyses. Remission was defined as no RLS symptoms for at least 6 months after the iron normalization. RESULTS: Over the observation period of 2.5±1.4 years, 15 patients reported no RLS symptom whereas 24 patients still complained of RLS symptoms. The remission rate of RLS with iron replacement was 38.5%. The relative risk of symptom persistence was increased by the duration of RLS symptoms (OR: 1.88, 95% CI: 1.01–3.49) or by the age at RLS diagnosis (OR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.01–1.56). CONCLUSION: Almost two-third of RLS patients with iron deficiency showed persistence of the symptom even after iron normalization. Considering that longer duration of RLS symptoms and older age at RLS diagnosis were risk factors for symptom persistence, early intervention of iron deficiency in RLS is warranted.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Diagnosis , Early Intervention, Educational , Ferritins , Iron , Logistic Models , Restless Legs Syndrome , Risk Factors
19.
Sleep Medicine and Psychophysiology ; : 68-73, 2018.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-738922

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to explore insomniac demographic characteristics and the type of consultation provided to hospitalized patients asked to the Department of Psychiatry for insomnia and to compare patient insomnia characteristics by consultation type. METHODS: We performed a retrospective chart review of 4,966 patients who were hospitalized from August 1, 2005 to December 31, 2011 that received consultation in the Department of Psychiatry. Among them, 236 patients were referred for insomnia. We compared the differences in demographic characteristics and types of consultation between the insomnia patient group and other patient group. We also compared the difference between demographic characteristics and type of consultation by dividing total subjects into ‘with reconsultation’ and ‘without reconsultation’ groups. RESULTS: Our results came from the analysis of 9,689 consecutive consultation requests. There were 4,966 patients that participated in the study over 6 years and 6 months. The overall consultation rate was 3.3% of all admissions and insomnia patients comprised 4.8% of those. The ratio of re-consultation for insomnia was 27.5%. There was no significant difference in mean age between the insomnia ‘with reconsultation group’ and the insomnia ‘without reconsultation group’, but the ‘with reconsultation’ group had significantly more male patients and medical patients than the ‘without re-consultation’ group. For insomnia patients, consultation types were in the order of Mending request (51.3%), Paralle request (36.6%), Complementary request (9.0%) and this composition differed from that of total admission patients. CONCLUSION: Hospitalized patients referred for insomnia showed a higher proportion of male patients, lower rates of re-consultation compared with other patients, and most of these were for secondary insomnia. Each doctor should be aware of the possibility of inpatient insomnia, conduct positive assessments and referrals as necessary, and psychiatrists who might be asked for consultation need to prepare an active intervention with initial diagnosis and treatment, as well as recommendations for the timing of reconsultation.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Diagnosis , Inpatients , Psychiatry , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
20.
Sleep Medicine and Psychophysiology ; : 15-20, 2018.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-738916

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to assess the change of heart rate variability (HRV) at resting, upright, and psychological stress states in depressive disorder patients. METHODS: HRV was measured at resting, upright, and psychological stress states in 62 depressive disorder patients. We used visual analogue scale (VAS) score to assess tension and stress severity. Beck depression inventory (BDI) and state trait anxiety inventories I and II (STAI-I and II) were used to assess depression and anxiety severity, respectively. Differences between HRV indices and VAS score were evaluated using paired t-tests. Gender difference analysis was conducted with ANCOVA. RESULTS: SDNN (standard deviation of normal to normal intervals), LF/HF (low frequency/high frequency), and VLF (very low frequency) were significantly increased, while NN50 and pNN50 were significantly decreased in the upright position compared to resting state. SDNN, RMSSD (root mean square of the differences of successive normal to normal intervals), and VLF were significantly increased, while pNN50 was significantly decreased in the psychological stress state compared to resting state. SDNN, NN50, and pNN50 were significantly lower in an upright position compared to a state of psychological stress, and LF, HF, and LF/HF showed no significant differences CONCLUSION: The LF/HF ratio was significantly increased after physical stress in depressive disorder. However, the LF/HF ratio was not significantly increased after psychological stress, and the change in LF/HF ratio after physical stress and psychological stress did not significantly differ from each other. Significant increase in SDNN, NN50, and pNN50 in an upright posture compared to psychological stress suggests that depressive patients react more sensitively to physical stress than psychological stress.


Subject(s)
Humans , Anxiety , Autonomic Nervous System , Depression , Depressive Disorder , Equipment and Supplies , Heart Rate , Heart , Posture , Stress, Psychological
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