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1.
Article in 0 | WPRIM | ID: wpr-902101

ABSTRACT

Kimura's disease is a rare disease of unknown etiology, commonly presenting with slow-growing head and neck subcutaneous nodules. It primarily involves the head and neck region, presenting as deep subcutaneous masses and is often accompanied by regional lymphadenopathy and salivary gland involvement. Clinically it is often confused with a parotid tumor or lymph node metastasis. It is difficult to diagnose before surgery, and fine needle aspiration cytology has only limited value. Even though this disease has not shown any malignant transformation, it is often difficult to cope with because of its high recurrence rate. Surgery, steroids, and radiotherapy have been used widely as the first-line recommendation, but none of them is standard procedure until now because of high recurrence rates. The recurrence of the disease reported up to 62%. We recently experienced a case of Kimura's disease, not accompanying peripheral eosinophilia, on the parotid gland treated by surgical resection in an 82-year-old woman with polycythemia vera. Here, we report this case with a review of the literature.

2.
Article in 0 | WPRIM | ID: wpr-894397

ABSTRACT

Kimura's disease is a rare disease of unknown etiology, commonly presenting with slow-growing head and neck subcutaneous nodules. It primarily involves the head and neck region, presenting as deep subcutaneous masses and is often accompanied by regional lymphadenopathy and salivary gland involvement. Clinically it is often confused with a parotid tumor or lymph node metastasis. It is difficult to diagnose before surgery, and fine needle aspiration cytology has only limited value. Even though this disease has not shown any malignant transformation, it is often difficult to cope with because of its high recurrence rate. Surgery, steroids, and radiotherapy have been used widely as the first-line recommendation, but none of them is standard procedure until now because of high recurrence rates. The recurrence of the disease reported up to 62%. We recently experienced a case of Kimura's disease, not accompanying peripheral eosinophilia, on the parotid gland treated by surgical resection in an 82-year-old woman with polycythemia vera. Here, we report this case with a review of the literature.

3.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-765179

ABSTRACT

The Korean Mental Health Act has been radically reformed recently in order to improve psychiatric patients' human rights by regulating the compulsory admission process. However, the expert group brought up questions about difficulties in practice and incoherence in its philosophy before the Act was implemented. There are already discussions concerning the next revision of the Act. In such a situation, lessons can be learned from the experiences of other countries. Articles on psychiatric compulsory admission were comprehensively reviewed with the focus on legal criteria, and found that current trends worldwide include a move towards broad diagnostic criteria, use of capacity and treatability test, and treatment in the interest of health rather than safety. In addition, we introduce the Whittington scale, an assessment tool for the appropriateness of hospitalization used in the Connecticut Mental Health Center, US, as a reference for the similar procedure being implemented soon in Korea.


Subject(s)
Connecticut , Dangerous Behavior , Hospitalization , Human Rights , Korea , Mental Disorders , Mental Health , Philosophy
4.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-140377

ABSTRACT

Today's diagnostic criteria are based on consensus, however, they are still incomplete and being changed. These unstable but temporarily dogmatic criteria have been constraining the thinking of individual psychiatrists, and invalidating painful scientific achievements based on previous ones. The limitation of the criteria system appears especially clear concerning depression due to the ambiguity of its definition. Therefore, the aim of this article was to review the history of various concepts of depression and to compare this to today's tendency, which attempts to consolidate diversity. In addition to all Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM), Internal Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9, ICD-9-CM, and ICD-10 were centrally discussed. Classic descriptions of depression were extracted from reviews of classic literature, and some salient concepts and the process by which they had been integrated, divided, and newly proposed was traced. The descriptions of depression whose prototype had been melancholia have experienced significant conceptual changes through DSM-IV and the most recent DSM-V ; they impose tasks that are yet to be resolved. Among them, whether various depressive syndromes are diverse phenotypes of one disorder or they all represent different disorders could be regarded as the most fundamental problem. In order to conduct fruitful studies and to ensure proper treatment of every patient, more precise nosologic understanding of depression must be pursued.


Subject(s)
Classification , Consensus , Depression , Depressive Disorder , Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders , Fruit , Humans , International Classification of Diseases , Phenotype , Psychiatry , Thinking
5.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-140376

ABSTRACT

Today's diagnostic criteria are based on consensus, however, they are still incomplete and being changed. These unstable but temporarily dogmatic criteria have been constraining the thinking of individual psychiatrists, and invalidating painful scientific achievements based on previous ones. The limitation of the criteria system appears especially clear concerning depression due to the ambiguity of its definition. Therefore, the aim of this article was to review the history of various concepts of depression and to compare this to today's tendency, which attempts to consolidate diversity. In addition to all Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM), Internal Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9, ICD-9-CM, and ICD-10 were centrally discussed. Classic descriptions of depression were extracted from reviews of classic literature, and some salient concepts and the process by which they had been integrated, divided, and newly proposed was traced. The descriptions of depression whose prototype had been melancholia have experienced significant conceptual changes through DSM-IV and the most recent DSM-V ; they impose tasks that are yet to be resolved. Among them, whether various depressive syndromes are diverse phenotypes of one disorder or they all represent different disorders could be regarded as the most fundamental problem. In order to conduct fruitful studies and to ensure proper treatment of every patient, more precise nosologic understanding of depression must be pursued.


Subject(s)
Classification , Consensus , Depression , Depressive Disorder , Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders , Fruit , Humans , International Classification of Diseases , Phenotype , Psychiatry , Thinking
6.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-87495

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to identify factors affecting fruit consumption behavior by application of the Theory of Planned Behavior. In addition, this study examined the moderating effect of a fruit eating habit. METHODS: A total of 734 consumers who have ever purchased fruit participated in this study. RESULTS: Results of this study showed that attitudes toward fruit intake, social norms, and perceived behavioral control had significant impacts on the level of fruit intake. Fruit eating habit that showed high correlation with eating behavior was also included in the model identifying factors having an influence on fruit intake. Attitudes toward fruit intake, social norms, and perceived behavioral control had a positive influence on intention to intake fruit. Fruit eating habits played a moderating role in the relationships between intention to intake fruit and real fruit intake. CONCLUSION: Increasing positive attitudes toward fruit intake, social norms, and perceived behavioral control would be helpful in increasing the amount of fruit intake.


Subject(s)
Eating , Feeding Behavior , Fruit , Intention
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