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1.
Experimental Neurobiology ; : 120-143, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-890648

ABSTRACT

Central neurocytoma (CN) has been known as a benign neuronal tumor. In rare cases, CN undergoes malignant transformation to glioblastomas (GBM). Here we examined its cellular origin by characterizing differentiation potential and gene expression of CN-spheroids. First, we demonstrate that both CN tissue and cultured primary cells recapitulate the hierarchal cellular composition of subventricular zone (SVZ), which is comprised of neural stem cells (NSCs), transit amplifying progenitors (TAPs), and neuroblasts. We then derived spheroids from CN which displayed EGFR+/ MASH+ TAP and BLBP+ radial glial cell (RGC) characteristic, and mitotic neurogenesis and gliogenesis by single spheroids were observed with cycling multipotential cells. CN-spheroids expressed increased levels of pluripotency and tumor stem cell genes such as KLF4 and TPD5L1, when compared to their differentiated cells and human NSCs. Importantly, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis showed that gene sets of GBM-Spheroids, EGFR Signaling, and Packaging of Telomere Ends are enriched in CN-spheroids in comparison with their differentiated cells. We speculate that CN tumor stem cells have TAP and RGC characteristics, and upregulation of EGFR signaling as well as downregulation of eph-ephrin signaling have critical roles in tumorigenesis of CN. And their ephemeral nature of TAPs destined to neuroblasts, might reflect benign nature of CN.

2.
Experimental Neurobiology ; : 120-143, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-898352

ABSTRACT

Central neurocytoma (CN) has been known as a benign neuronal tumor. In rare cases, CN undergoes malignant transformation to glioblastomas (GBM). Here we examined its cellular origin by characterizing differentiation potential and gene expression of CN-spheroids. First, we demonstrate that both CN tissue and cultured primary cells recapitulate the hierarchal cellular composition of subventricular zone (SVZ), which is comprised of neural stem cells (NSCs), transit amplifying progenitors (TAPs), and neuroblasts. We then derived spheroids from CN which displayed EGFR+/ MASH+ TAP and BLBP+ radial glial cell (RGC) characteristic, and mitotic neurogenesis and gliogenesis by single spheroids were observed with cycling multipotential cells. CN-spheroids expressed increased levels of pluripotency and tumor stem cell genes such as KLF4 and TPD5L1, when compared to their differentiated cells and human NSCs. Importantly, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis showed that gene sets of GBM-Spheroids, EGFR Signaling, and Packaging of Telomere Ends are enriched in CN-spheroids in comparison with their differentiated cells. We speculate that CN tumor stem cells have TAP and RGC characteristics, and upregulation of EGFR signaling as well as downregulation of eph-ephrin signaling have critical roles in tumorigenesis of CN. And their ephemeral nature of TAPs destined to neuroblasts, might reflect benign nature of CN.

3.
Experimental & Molecular Medicine ; : e317-2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-212089

ABSTRACT

Gliosarcoma (GS) is a rare variant (2%) of glioblastoma (GBM) that poses clinical genomic challenges because of its poor prognosis and limited genomic information. To gain a comprehensive view of the genomic alterations in GS and to understand the molecular etiology of GS, we applied whole-exome sequencing analyses for 28 GS cases (6 blood-matched fresh-frozen tissues for the discovery set, 22 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues for the validation set) and copy-number variation microarrays for 5 blood-matched fresh-frozen tissues. TP53 mutations were more prevalent in the GS cases (20/28, 70%) compared to the GBM cases (29/90, 32%), and the GS patients with TP53 mutations showed a significantly shorter survival (multivariate Cox analysis, hazard ratio=23.9, 95% confidence interval, 2.87–199.63, P=0.003). A pathway analysis showed recurrent alterations in MAPK signaling (EGFR, RASGRF2 and TP53), phosphatidylinositol/calcium signaling (CACNA1s, PLCs and ITPRs) and focal adhesion/tight junction (PTEN and PAK3) pathways. Genomic profiling of the matched recurrent GS cases detected the occurrence of TP53 mutations in two recurrent GS cases, which suggests that TP53 mutations play a role in treatment resistance. Functionally, we found that TP53 mutations are associated with the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) process of sarcomatous components of GS. We provide the first comprehensive genome-wide genetic alternation profiling of GS, which suggests novel prognostic subgroups in GS patients based on their TP53 mutation status and provides new insight in the pathogenesis and targeted treatment of GS.


Subject(s)
Humans , Glioblastoma , Gliosarcoma , Prevalence , Prognosis
4.
Experimental Neurobiology ; : 295-306, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-18843

ABSTRACT

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive form of brain tumors. GBMs, like other tumors, rely relatively less on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and utilize more aerobic glycolysis, and this metabolic shift becomes augmented under hypoxia. In the present study, we investigated the physiological significance of altered glucose metabolism and hypoxic adaptation in the GBM cell line U251 and two newly established primary GBMs (GBM28 and GBM37). We found that these three GBMs exhibited differential growth rates under hypoxia compared to those under normoxia. Under normoxia, the basal expressions of HIF1α and the glycolysis-associated genes, PDK1, PDK3, and GLUT1, were relatively low in U251 and GBM28, while their basal expressions were high in GBM37. Under hypoxia, the expressions of these genes were enhanced further in all three GBMs. Treatment with dichloroacetate (DCA), an inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK), induced cell death in GBM28 and GBM37 maintained under normoxia, whereas DCA effects disappeared under hypoxia, suggesting that hypoxic adaptation dominated DCA effects in these GBMs. In contrast, the inhibition of HIF1α with chrysin suppressed the expression of PDK1, PDK3, and GLUT1 and markedly promoted cell death of all GBMs under both normoxia and hypoxia. Interestingly, however, GBMs treated with chrysin under hypoxia still sustained higher viability than those under normoxia, and chrysin and DCA co-treatment was unable to eliminate this hypoxia-dependent resistance. Together, these results suggest that hypoxic adaptation is critical for maintaining viability of GBMs, and targeting hypoxic adaptation can be an important treatment option for GBMs.


Subject(s)
Hypoxia , Brain Neoplasms , Cell Death , Cell Line , Dichloroacetic Acid , Glioblastoma , Glucose , Glycolysis , Metabolism , Oxidative Phosphorylation , Oxidoreductases , Phosphotransferases , Pyruvic Acid
5.
Experimental Neurobiology ; : 1-13, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-169714

ABSTRACT

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a set of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by a deficit in social behaviors and nonverbal interactions such as reduced eye contact, facial expression, and body gestures in the first 3 years of life. It is not a single disorder, and it is broadly considered to be a multi-factorial disorder resulting from genetic and non-genetic risk factors and their interaction. Genetic studies of ASD have identified mutations that interfere with typical neurodevelopment in utero through childhood. These complexes of genes have been involved in synaptogenesis and axon motility. Recent developments in neuroimaging studies have provided many important insights into the pathological changes that occur in the brain of patients with ASD in vivo. Especially, the role of amygdala, a major component of the limbic system and the affective loop of the cortico-striatothalamo-cortical circuit, in cognition and ASD has been proved in numerous neuropathological and neuroimaging studies. Besides the amygdala, the nucleus accumbens is also considered as the key structure which is related with the social reward response in ASD. Although educational and behavioral treatments have been the mainstay of the management of ASD, pharmacological and interventional treatments have also shown some benefit in subjects with ASD. Also, there have been reports about few patients who experienced improvement after deep brain stimulation, one of the interventional treatments. The key architecture of ASD development which could be a target for treatment is still an uncharted territory. Further work is needed to broaden the horizons on the understanding of ASD.


Subject(s)
Child , Humans , Amygdala , Autistic Disorder , Axons , Brain , Autism Spectrum Disorder , Cognition , Deep Brain Stimulation , Facial Expression , Gestures , Limbic System , Neurobiology , Neuroimaging , Nucleus Accumbens , Reward , Risk Factors , Social Behavior
6.
Experimental Neurobiology ; : 235-245, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-215499

ABSTRACT

MTT assay is commonly used to assess the cellular cytotoxicity caused by anticancer drugs in glioblastomas. However, there have been some reports insisting that MTT assay exhibited non-specific intracellular reduction of tetrazolium which led to underestimated results of cytotoxicity. Here, we examine whether or not MTT assay can lead to incorrect information regarding alcohol-induced cytotoxicity on immortalized and primary glioblastoma cells. MTT assay was applied to assess the ethanol-induced cytotoxicity at various ethanol concentrations. The cellular cytotoxicity induced by different doses of ethanol was analyzed and compared through several cytotoxic assays. Ethanol-induced cytotoxicity observed through MTT assay on both cell types was shown to be ethanol dose-dependent below a 3% concentration. However, the cytotoxicity was shown to be markedly underestimated only in primary cells at a 5% concentration. RT-PCR and Western Blot showed increased expressions of pro-apoptotic proteins and decreased expressions of anti-apoptotic proteins in an ethanol dose-dependent manner in both cell types. Furthermore, we present a possible mechanism for the unreliable result of MTT assay. A high concentration of ethanol induces more severe membrane damage and increased intracellular concentration of NADH in primary cells which enhances the nonspecific reduction of tetrazolium salt. Together, our findings demonstrate that the cytotoxicity on primary cells could inaccurately be assessed when detected through MTT assay. Therefore, a careful interpretation is needed when one would analyze the cytotoxic results of MTT assay, and it is suggested that other assays must be accompanied to produce more reliable and accurate cytotoxic results on primary glioblastoma cells.


Subject(s)
Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins , Blotting, Western , Ethanol , Glioblastoma , Membranes , NAD , Tetrazolium Salts
7.
Experimental Neurobiology ; : 103-116, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-175047

ABSTRACT

Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) with motor and nonmotor symptoms. Defective mitochondrial function and increased oxidative stress (OS) have been demonstrated as having an important role in PD pathogenesis, although the underlying mechanism is not clear. The etiopathogenesis of sporadic PD is complex with variable contributions of environmental factors and genetic susceptibility. Both these factors influence various mitochondrial aspects, including their life cycle, bioenergetic capacity, quality control, dynamic changes of morphology and connectivity (fusion, fission), subcellular distribution (transport), and the regulation of cell death pathways. Mitochondrial dysfunction has mainly been reported in various non-dopaminergic cells and tissue samples from human patients as well as transgenic mouse and fruit fly models of PD. Thus, the mitochondria represent a highly promising target for the development of PD biomarkers. However, the limited amount of dopaminergic neurons prevented investigation of their detailed study. For the first time, we established human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)-immortalized wild type, idiopathic and Parkin deficient mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) isolated from the adipose tissues of PD patients, which could be used as a good cellular model to evaluate mitochondrial dysfunction for the better understanding of PD pathology and for the development of early diagnostic markers and effective therapy targets of PD. In this review, we examine evidence for the roles of mitochondrial dysfunction and increased OS in the neuronal loss that leads to PD and discuss how this knowledge further improve the treatment for patients with PD.


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Mice , Cell Death , Diptera , Dopaminergic Neurons , Energy Metabolism , Fruit , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Life Cycle Stages , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , Mice, Transgenic , Mitochondria , Neurons , Oxidative Stress , Parkinson Disease , Pathology , Quality Control , Substantia Nigra , Telomerase , Biomarkers
8.
Experimental Neurobiology ; : 146-155, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-175042

ABSTRACT

Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is one of the devastating types of stroke. Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) have potential benefits in recovery from brain damage following ICH. This study aimed to identify the beneficial effects of hUCB-MSCs and investigate whether they have anti-inflammatory effects on the ICH brain via neurotrophic factors or cytokines. hUCB-MSCs were transplanted into a collagenase-induced ICH rat model. At 2, 9, 16, and 30 days after ICH, rotarod and limb placement tests were performed to measure behavioral outcomes. ICH rats were sacrificed to evaluate the volume of lesion using H&E staining. Immunostaining was performed to investigate neurogenesis, angiogenesis, and anti-apoptosis at 4 weeks after transplantation. Inflammatory factors (TNF-alpha, COX-2, microglia, and neutrophils) were analyzed by immunofluorescence staining, RT-PCR, and Western blot at 3 days after transplantation. hUCB-MSCs were associated with neurological benefits and reduction in lesion volume. The hUCB-MSCs-treated group tended to reveal high levels of neurogenesis, angiogenesis, and anti-apoptosis (significant for angiogenesis). The expression levels of inflammatory factors tended to be reduced in the hUCB-MSCs-treated group compared with the controls. Our study suggests that hUCB-MSCs may improve neurological outcomes and modulate inflammation-associated immune cells and cytokines in ICH-induced inflammatory responses.


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Rats , Apoptosis , Blotting, Western , Brain , Cerebral Hemorrhage , Cytokines , Extremities , Fluorescent Antibody Technique , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , Microglia , Models, Animal , Nerve Growth Factors , Neurogenesis , Stroke , Umbilical Cord
9.
Experimental Neurobiology ; : 55-70, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-190710

ABSTRACT

Successful recovery from brain ischemia is limited due to poor vascularization surrounding the ischemic zone. Cell therapy with strong angiogenic factors could be an effective strategy to rescue the ischemic brain. We investigated whether cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP)-Ang1, a soluble, stable and potent Ang1 variant, enhances the angiogenesis of human cord blood derived endothelial progenitor cells (hCB-EPCs) for rescuing brain from ischemic injury. COMP-Ang1 markedly improved the tube formation of capillaries by EPCs and incorporation of EPCs into tube formation with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) upon incubation on matrigel in vitro. COMP-Ang1 stimulated the migration of EPCs more than HUVECs in a scratch wound migration assay. The transplanted EPCs and COMP-Ang1 were incorporated into the blood vessels and decreased the infarct volume in the rat ischemic brain. Molecular studies revealed that COMP-Ang1 induced an interaction between Tie2 and FAK, but AKT was separated from the Tie2-FAK-AKT complex in the EPC plasma membrane. Tie2-FAK increased pp38, pSAPK/JNK, and pERK-mediated MAPK activation and interacted with integrins alphanubeta3, alpha4, beta1, finally leading to migration of EPCs. AKT recruited mTOR, SDF-1, and HIF-1alpha to induce angiogenesis. Taken together, it is concluded that COMP-Ang1 potentiates the angiogenesis of EPCs and enhances the vascular morphogenesis indicating that combination of EPCs with COMP-Ang1 may be a potentially effective regimen for ischemic brain injury salvage therapy.


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Rats , Angiogenesis Inducing Agents , Blood Vessels , Brain , Brain Injuries , Brain Ischemia , Capillaries , Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein , Cell Membrane , Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy , Fetal Blood , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells , Integrins , Ischemia , Morphogenesis , Salvage Therapy , Stem Cells , Wounds and Injuries
10.
Experimental Neurobiology ; : 258-265, 2014.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-50920

ABSTRACT

Destruction of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) is a common pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Characteristics of PD patients include bradykinesia, muscle rigidity, tremor at rest and disturbances in balance. For about four decades, PD animal models have been produced by toxin-induced or gene-modified techniques. However, in mice, none of the gene-modified models showed all 4 major criteria of PD. Moreover, distinguishing between PD model pigs and normal pigs has not been well established. Therefore, we planned to produce a pig model for PD by chronic subcutaneous administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), neurotoxin. Changes in behavioral patterns of pigs were thoroughly evaluated and a new motor scoring system was established for this porcine model that was based on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) in human PD patients. In summary, this motor scoring system could be helpful to analyze the porcine PD model and to confirm the pathology prior to further examinations, such as positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), which is expensive, and invasive immunohistochemistry (IHC) of the brain.


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Mice , 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine , Brain , Dopaminergic Neurons , Electrons , Hypokinesia , Immunohistochemistry , Injections, Subcutaneous , Models, Animal , Muscle Rigidity , Parkinson Disease , Pathology , Substantia Nigra , Swine , Tremor
11.
Experimental Neurobiology ; : 283-300, 2013.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-84007

ABSTRACT

Mitochondrial dysfunction in dopaminergic neurons of patients with idiopathic and familial Parkinson's disease (PD) is well known although the underlying mechanism is not clear. We established a homogeneous population of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hAD-MSCs) from human adult patients with early-onset hereditary familial Parkin-defect PD as well as late-onset idiopathic PD by immortalizing cells with the hTERT gene to better understand the underlying mechanism of PD. The hAD-MSCs from patients with idiopathic PD were designated as "PD", from patients with Parkin-defect PD as "Parkin" and from patients with pituitary adenomas as "non-PD" in short. The pGRN145 plasmid containing hTERT was introduced to establish telomerase immortalized cells. The established hTERT-immortalized cell lines showed chromosomal aneuploidy sustained stably over two-years. The morphological study of mitochondria in the primary and immortalized hAD-MSCs showed that the mitochondria of the non-PD were normal; however, those of the PD and Parkin were gradually damaged. A striking decrease in mitochondrial complex I, II, and IV activities was observed in the hTERT-immortalized cells from the patients with idiopathic and Parkin-defect PD. Comparative Western blot analyses were performed to investigate the expressions of PD specific marker proteins in the hTERT-immortalized cell lines. This study suggests that the hTERT-immortalized hAD-MSC cell lines established from patients with idiopathic and familial Parkin-defect PD could be good cellular models to evaluate mitochondrial dysfunction to better understand the pathogenesis of PD and to develop early diagnostic markers and effective therapy targets for the treatment of PD.


Subject(s)
Adult , Humans , Aneuploidy , Blotting, Western , Cell Line , Diagnosis , Dopaminergic Neurons , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , Mitochondria , Parkinson Disease , Pituitary Neoplasms , Plasmids , Strikes, Employee , Telomerase
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