Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 3 de 3
Filter
Add filters








Language
Year range
1.
The Korean Journal of Pain ; : 304-314, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-903817

ABSTRACT

Background@#The study investigated virtual reality (VR) immersion in alleviating procedure-related pain in patients with chronic pain undergoing fluoroscopy-guided minimally-invasive intervention in a prone position at an outpatient clinic. @*Methods@#In this prospective randomized controlled study, 38 patients undergoing lumbar sympathetic ganglion block were randomized into either the VR or the control group. In the VR group, procedure-related pain was controlled via infiltration of local anesthetics while watching a 30-minute VR hypnotic program. In the control group, the skin infiltration alone was used, with the VR device switched off. The primary endpoint was an 11-point score on the numerical rating scale, indicating procedure-related pain. Patients’ satisfaction with pain control, anxiety levels, the need for additional local anesthetics during the procedure, hemodynamic stability, and any adverse events were assessed. @*Results@#Procedure-related pain was significantly lower in the VR group (3.7 ± 1.4) than in the control group (5.5 ± 1.7; P = 0.002). Post-procedural anxiety was lower in the VR group than in the control group (P = 0.025), with a significant reduction from pre-procedural anxiety (P < 0.001). Although patients’ satisfaction did not differ significantly (P = 0.158) between the groups, a higher number of patients required additional local anesthetics in the control group (n = 13) than in the VR group (n = 4; P = 0.001). No severe adverse events occurred in either group during the study. @*Conclusions@#VR immersion can be safely used as a novel adjunct to reduce procedural pain and anxiety during fluoroscopic pain intervention.

2.
The Korean Journal of Pain ; : 304-314, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-896113

ABSTRACT

Background@#The study investigated virtual reality (VR) immersion in alleviating procedure-related pain in patients with chronic pain undergoing fluoroscopy-guided minimally-invasive intervention in a prone position at an outpatient clinic. @*Methods@#In this prospective randomized controlled study, 38 patients undergoing lumbar sympathetic ganglion block were randomized into either the VR or the control group. In the VR group, procedure-related pain was controlled via infiltration of local anesthetics while watching a 30-minute VR hypnotic program. In the control group, the skin infiltration alone was used, with the VR device switched off. The primary endpoint was an 11-point score on the numerical rating scale, indicating procedure-related pain. Patients’ satisfaction with pain control, anxiety levels, the need for additional local anesthetics during the procedure, hemodynamic stability, and any adverse events were assessed. @*Results@#Procedure-related pain was significantly lower in the VR group (3.7 ± 1.4) than in the control group (5.5 ± 1.7; P = 0.002). Post-procedural anxiety was lower in the VR group than in the control group (P = 0.025), with a significant reduction from pre-procedural anxiety (P < 0.001). Although patients’ satisfaction did not differ significantly (P = 0.158) between the groups, a higher number of patients required additional local anesthetics in the control group (n = 13) than in the VR group (n = 4; P = 0.001). No severe adverse events occurred in either group during the study. @*Conclusions@#VR immersion can be safely used as a novel adjunct to reduce procedural pain and anxiety during fluoroscopic pain intervention.

3.
Korean Journal of Anesthesiology ; : 334-341, 2014.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-41284

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: General anesthetics induce neuronal apoptosis in the immature brain. Regional anesthesia using local anesthetics can be an alternative to general anesthesia. Therefore, this study investigated the possible effect of lidocaine on neuronal apoptosis. METHODS: Fifty-one 7-day-old C57BL6 mice were allocated into control (group C), lidocaine (group L), lidocaine plus midazolam (group LM) and isoflurane (group I) groups. Group C received normal saline administration. Groups L and LM were injected with lidocaine (4 mg/kg, subcutaneously) only and the same dose of lidocaine plus midazolam (9 mg/kg, subcutaneously). Group I was exposed to 0.75 vol% isoflurane for 6 h. After 6 h, apoptotic neurodegeneration was assessed using caspase-3 immunostaining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) staining. RESULTS: For the entire brain section, neuronal cells exhibiting caspase-3 activation were observed more frequently in group I than in group C (P < 0.001). In the thalamus, apoptosis of group L was more frequent than that of group C (P < 0.001), but less freqent than that of groups LM and I (P = 0.0075 and P < 0.001, respectively). In the cortex, group I experienced more apoptosis than group L and C (all Ps < 0.001). On TUNEL staining, the difference in apoptosis between the lidocaine and control groups was marginal (P = 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Lidocaine induced minimal apoptosis in the developing brain compared with isoflurane and lidocaine plus midazolam. However, we cannot fully exclude the possible adverse effect of subcutaneously administered lidocaine on the developing brain.


Subject(s)
Animals , Mice , Anesthesia, Conduction , Anesthesia, General , Anesthetics, General , Anesthetics, Local , Apoptosis , Brain , Caspase 3 , DNA Nucleotidylexotransferase , In Situ Nick-End Labeling , Isoflurane , Lidocaine , Midazolam , Neurons , Thalamus
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL