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1.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-213230

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Intestinal tuberculosis can be difficult to diagnose because it may mimic many other intestinal diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic yield of colonoscopic biopsy and frequency of concomittent extra-intestinal tuberculosis in intestinal tuberculosis. METHODS: The medical records of 225 consecutive patients with intestinal tuberculosis (81 men, 144 women; mean age 40.6 yrs) were analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS: Histological examination of colonoscopic biopsy specimens revealed granulomas in 163 (72.4%) of the 225 patients. However, caseous necrosis was found in only 25 (11.1%) patients, and acid-fast bacilli (AFB) were noted in 39 (17.3%) of the 225 patients. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was isolated from the culture of biopsy specimens in 52 (29.3%) of 177 patients. Eighty-four patients (37.3%) had concomitant extra-intestinal tuberculosis and 67 (29.8%) showed active pulmonary tuberculosis. Histological examination of the biopsy specimens enabled the diagnosis of intestinal tuberculosis by the presence of either caseating granulomas or AFB in 52 (23.1%) patients. Combination of histological examination and Mycobacterium culture established the diagnosis in 87 (38.7%) patients. Before getting the result of Mycobacterium culture, the diagnosis could be made, by either histological examination or the presence of extra-intestinal tuberculosis in 107 (47.6%) patients. Combination of caseating granulomas, AFB staining, Mycobacterium culture, and the presence of extra-intestinal tuberculosis resulted in the diagnosis in 126 (56.0%) patients. CONCLUSIONS: To increase the diagnostic yield, AFB staining and Mycobacterium culture should be routinely performed on biopsy specimens in addition to routine histological examination for caseating granulomas.


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Biopsy, Needle , Colonoscopy , English Abstract , Female , Humans , Intestinal Diseases/diagnosis , Male , Middle Aged , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/isolation & purification , Tuberculosis, Gastrointestinal/complications , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/complications
2.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-32425

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Cowden's disease is an autosomal dominant hereditary disease characterized by the various hamartomatous and neoplastic lesions of multiple organs. We analyzed gastrointestinal manifestations of 5 cases of Cowden's disease and suggest several findings which are helpful to gastroenterologists for the early diagnosis. METHODS: The clinical characteristics of 5 unrelated patients with Cowden's disease were evaluated. Four patients were male, one patient was female, and their ages at the time diagnosis ranged from 17 to 49 years. All patients had the pathognomonic mucocutaneous lesions and thyroid nodules. RESULTS: In all patients, the esophagus was affected by acanthosis. In 4 patients, the stomach was affected by numerous variable sized polyps. In 4 patients, the duodenum was involved by several polyps. In 4 patients, the entire small bowel and in one patients, only the terminal ileum was affected by numerous polyps. In all patients, the colon, especially the sigmoid colon and rectum, showed numerous variable sized polyps. Family history was positive for stomach cancer in two patients. CONCLUSIONS: Cowden's disease should be considered in patients with esophageal acanthosis among patients with colonic polyposis, although the mucocutaneous lesions, unfamiliar to gastroenterolgists, are pathognomonic criteria for the diagnosis.


Subject(s)
Colon , Colon, Sigmoid , Diagnosis , Duodenum , Early Diagnosis , Esophagus , Female , Genetic Diseases, Inborn , Hamartoma Syndrome, Multiple , Humans , Ileum , Male , Polyps , Rectum , Stomach , Stomach Neoplasms , Thyroid Nodule
3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-83849

ABSTRACT

Treatment-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS) and acute myelogenous leukemia (t-AML) are now well established as complications of cytotoxic chemotherapy. We experienced a 28-yr-old female patient who developed t-MDS/t-AML with characteristic chromosomal abnormalities including 11q23 chromosomal rearrangement following high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The patient was admitted with bulky abdominal masses of B cell lineage non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. After 2 cycles of systemic chemotherapy of the Vanderbilt regimen, the patient underwent ASCT with high dose chemotherapy of the BEAC regimen. She also received radiation of 48 Gy for the residual periportal lymphadenopathy. The initial cytogenetic analysis of the infused mononuclear cells revealed a normal karyotype. Twenty two months after the ASCT, pancytopenia was noted and her bone marrow aspirate showed dysplastic hemopoiesis with myeloblasts up to 12% of nonerythroid nucleated cells. The patient was diagnosed as t-MDS (refractory anemia with an excess of blasts). Cytogenetic analysis showed complex chromosomal abnormalities including 11q23 rearrangement, which is frequently found in topoisomerase II inhibitor-related hematologic malignancies. Four months later, it was noted that the t-MDS had evolved into an overt t-AML. Cytogenetic analysis showed an evolving pattern with more complex abnormalities. The patient was treated with combination che-motherapy, but her leukemic cells were resistant to the therapy.


Subject(s)
Adult , Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , Bone Marrow Cells/pathology , Carmustine/adverse effects , Chromosome Aberrations , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11 , Combined Modality Therapy/adverse effects , Cyclophosphamide/adverse effects , Cytarabine/adverse effects , Etoposide/adverse effects , Female , Gene Rearrangement , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Humans , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/etiology , Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin/therapy , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/etiology , Neoplasms, Second Primary/etiology , Pelvis , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic/therapy , Transplantation, Autologous
4.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-132958

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: PFD is effectively treated by biofeedback therapy. For the definite diagnosis of PFD, defecography, colon transit time study, balloon expulsion testing, and anorectal manometry are needed. However, these methods are of high cost and cause discomfort to patients. Moreover, definite diagnosis cannot be made by a single test due to a high false positive rate. In general, several symptoms linked with problems in defecating, including excessive straining, the sensation of incomplete evacuation, and applying pressure around the anus or the vagina to facilitate defecation, are known to be frequently associated with PFD. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether specific clinical parameters could differentiate patients with PFD from other constipated patients. METHODS: An organized questionnaire including 47 questions that contained subjective symptoms, past medical history, and eating habits was designed. The questionnaire was distributed to 132 patients who fulfilled Rome II criteria for functional constipation. Digital rectal examination was conducted by a single gastroenterologist. RESULTS: Among 132 patients, 45 patients were categorized as PFD, 26 patients as slow transit constipation (STC) and 17 patients as normal transit constipation. Among specific questions about constipation, hard stool was more frequently noted in patients with STC than PFD (p<0.05), and the frequency of defecation was lower in patients with STC than PFD (p<0.05). However, the symptoms suggesting difficult defecation were not different between the two groups. The percentage of paradoxical contraction by digital rectal examination was not different between the two groups (PFD: 57.1% vs. STC: 48.0%). CONCLUSION: The symptoms and signs suggesting difficult defecation could not differentiate PFD from STC and normal transit constipation, although several parameters were different among the three subgroups. Therefore, anorectal physiologic tests are needed for the diagnosis of PFD.


Subject(s)
Anal Canal , Ataxia , Biofeedback, Psychology , Colon , Constipation , Defecation , Defecography , Diagnosis , Digital Rectal Examination , Eating , Humans , Manometry , Pelvic Floor , Sensation , Time and Motion Studies , Vagina , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-132955

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: PFD is effectively treated by biofeedback therapy. For the definite diagnosis of PFD, defecography, colon transit time study, balloon expulsion testing, and anorectal manometry are needed. However, these methods are of high cost and cause discomfort to patients. Moreover, definite diagnosis cannot be made by a single test due to a high false positive rate. In general, several symptoms linked with problems in defecating, including excessive straining, the sensation of incomplete evacuation, and applying pressure around the anus or the vagina to facilitate defecation, are known to be frequently associated with PFD. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether specific clinical parameters could differentiate patients with PFD from other constipated patients. METHODS: An organized questionnaire including 47 questions that contained subjective symptoms, past medical history, and eating habits was designed. The questionnaire was distributed to 132 patients who fulfilled Rome II criteria for functional constipation. Digital rectal examination was conducted by a single gastroenterologist. RESULTS: Among 132 patients, 45 patients were categorized as PFD, 26 patients as slow transit constipation (STC) and 17 patients as normal transit constipation. Among specific questions about constipation, hard stool was more frequently noted in patients with STC than PFD (p<0.05), and the frequency of defecation was lower in patients with STC than PFD (p<0.05). However, the symptoms suggesting difficult defecation were not different between the two groups. The percentage of paradoxical contraction by digital rectal examination was not different between the two groups (PFD: 57.1% vs. STC: 48.0%). CONCLUSION: The symptoms and signs suggesting difficult defecation could not differentiate PFD from STC and normal transit constipation, although several parameters were different among the three subgroups. Therefore, anorectal physiologic tests are needed for the diagnosis of PFD.


Subject(s)
Anal Canal , Ataxia , Biofeedback, Psychology , Colon , Constipation , Defecation , Defecography , Diagnosis , Digital Rectal Examination , Eating , Humans , Manometry , Pelvic Floor , Sensation , Time and Motion Studies , Vagina , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-178534

ABSTRACT

Most T-cell lymphomas arise from mature alpabeta T-cells and commonly involve the nodes. Lymphomas bearing the gamadelta T-cell receptor (TCR) are very rare, and involve the lymph nodes minimally, if at all. Hepatosplenic gamadelta T-cell lymphoma is a recently identified, rare entity in which lymphoma cells bearing the gamadelta TCR infiltrate the sinusoids of the liver, splenic red pulp, and bone marrow. Its leukemic transformation is even more rare. Recently, we experienced a case of hepatosplenic gamadelta T-cell lymphoma in a 19-year-old woman who presented with epigastric pain, fever, massive splenomegaly, andpancytopenia. The splenectomy specimen and excisional biopsy of the liver revealed the infiltration of atypical T lymphocytes with the immunophenotypic markers of CD3 (+), CD45RO (pan-T antigen) (+), TIA-1(+), CD4(-),CD8 (-), CD56 (-), and S100 (-) in the sinusoids of the liver and splenic red pulp. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) showed that these cells had the expression of the TCR gama gene rearrangements. Though the pancytopenia had improved after the splenectomy, the response of chemotherapy was transient. Her disease progressed rapidly and she expired in the leukemic phase. We report a case of hepatosplenic gamadelta T-cell lymphoma that developed in a young woman, along with a brief review of the literature.


Subject(s)
Biopsy , Bone Marrow , Drug Therapy , Female , Fever , Gene Rearrangement , Glycogen Storage Disease Type VI , Humans , Liver , Lymph Nodes , Lymphoma , Lymphoma, T-Cell , Pancytopenia , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell , Splenectomy , Splenomegaly , T-Lymphocytes , Young Adult
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