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1.
Journal of Breast Cancer ; : 85-96, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-891297

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Physicians' awareness of their cancer patients' unmet needs is an essential element for providing effective treatment. This study investigated the accuracy of physicians' awareness of breast cancer survivors' unmet needs in Korea. @*Methods@#A cross-sectional interview survey was performed among 106 physicians and 320 Korean breast cancer survivors. The Comprehensive Needs Assessment Tool was administered to physicians and cancer survivors after obtaining their written informed consent to participate. Data were analyzed using t-test, analysis of variance, and multiple regression analysis. @*Results@#The level of unmet needs was highest in the hospital service domain (mean ± standard deviation: 2.19 ± 0.82), and the top-ranked unmet need item was “wished my doctor to be easy, specific, and honest in his/her explanation” (2.44 ± 0.93). Higher unmet needs were correlated with the presence of a genetic counseling clinic. They were not associated with age, sex, marital status, religion, department, working period, type of institution, number of staff, and number of operations. In multiple regression analysis, the presence of a genetic counseling clinic was associated with a higher level of recognition for psychological problems, social support, hospital service, and information and education needs. Physicians overestimated breast cancer survivors' unmet needs in all domains, compared to their selfreported unmet needs. The discordance in the perceived unmet needs was highest in the ‘family/personal relationship problems’ domain. @*Conclusions@#Physicians who treat Korean breast cancer survivors rated the level of unmet needs of breast cancer survivors as highest in the hospital service domain. The presence of a genetic counseling clinic in physicians' institutions was associated with a higher perception of survivors' unmet needs. Physicians overestimated the level of unmet needs in Korean breast cancer survivors. Efforts to reduce these discordances are needed to implement optimal survivorship care.

2.
Journal of Breast Cancer ; : 85-96, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-899001

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Physicians' awareness of their cancer patients' unmet needs is an essential element for providing effective treatment. This study investigated the accuracy of physicians' awareness of breast cancer survivors' unmet needs in Korea. @*Methods@#A cross-sectional interview survey was performed among 106 physicians and 320 Korean breast cancer survivors. The Comprehensive Needs Assessment Tool was administered to physicians and cancer survivors after obtaining their written informed consent to participate. Data were analyzed using t-test, analysis of variance, and multiple regression analysis. @*Results@#The level of unmet needs was highest in the hospital service domain (mean ± standard deviation: 2.19 ± 0.82), and the top-ranked unmet need item was “wished my doctor to be easy, specific, and honest in his/her explanation” (2.44 ± 0.93). Higher unmet needs were correlated with the presence of a genetic counseling clinic. They were not associated with age, sex, marital status, religion, department, working period, type of institution, number of staff, and number of operations. In multiple regression analysis, the presence of a genetic counseling clinic was associated with a higher level of recognition for psychological problems, social support, hospital service, and information and education needs. Physicians overestimated breast cancer survivors' unmet needs in all domains, compared to their selfreported unmet needs. The discordance in the perceived unmet needs was highest in the ‘family/personal relationship problems’ domain. @*Conclusions@#Physicians who treat Korean breast cancer survivors rated the level of unmet needs of breast cancer survivors as highest in the hospital service domain. The presence of a genetic counseling clinic in physicians' institutions was associated with a higher perception of survivors' unmet needs. Physicians overestimated the level of unmet needs in Korean breast cancer survivors. Efforts to reduce these discordances are needed to implement optimal survivorship care.

3.
Journal of Breast Disease ; (2): 100-107, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-891316

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#This study aimed to investigate and analyze the current fertility-related practices for breast cancer patients; the results are intended to help improve the quality of life of young patients and survivors. @*Methods@#This study collected voluntary responses to a questionnaire that was used to survey Korean breast cancer specialists. The questionnaire consisted of five categories: knowledge, practice behaviors regarding fertility preservation, barriers to discussing fertility preservation, attitude toward fertility issues, and demographics and medical background. @*Results@#A total of 120 copies of the questionnaire were distributed; the response rate was 89%. The section of the questionnaire regarding knowledge indicated that most respondents had adequate fertility preservation knowledge for cancer patients. However, 13.1% of the respondents indicated that they thought pregnancy increased the cancer recurrence risk. Respondents’ knowledge and attitudes about fertility preservation were not correlated with actual practice. The absence of patient’s expressions (24.30%), high recurrence risk (27.10%), insufficient time in the clinic (21.50%), and hospital conditions such as no reproductive specialists or infertility clinic (16.82%), were considered major barriers to discussing fertility issues. @*Conclusion@#Although more than 50% of the respondents thought that cancer treatment is more important than fertility preservation and it is complex and difficult, the Korean breast surgical oncologists were generally encouraging when discussing fertility issues with young breast cancer patients. Hence, breast clinicians should share with young patients the updated evidence regarding the feasibility and safety of pregnancy after cancer treatment and the available options so that the best decisions can be made.

4.
Journal of Breast Disease ; (2): 100-107, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-899020

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#This study aimed to investigate and analyze the current fertility-related practices for breast cancer patients; the results are intended to help improve the quality of life of young patients and survivors. @*Methods@#This study collected voluntary responses to a questionnaire that was used to survey Korean breast cancer specialists. The questionnaire consisted of five categories: knowledge, practice behaviors regarding fertility preservation, barriers to discussing fertility preservation, attitude toward fertility issues, and demographics and medical background. @*Results@#A total of 120 copies of the questionnaire were distributed; the response rate was 89%. The section of the questionnaire regarding knowledge indicated that most respondents had adequate fertility preservation knowledge for cancer patients. However, 13.1% of the respondents indicated that they thought pregnancy increased the cancer recurrence risk. Respondents’ knowledge and attitudes about fertility preservation were not correlated with actual practice. The absence of patient’s expressions (24.30%), high recurrence risk (27.10%), insufficient time in the clinic (21.50%), and hospital conditions such as no reproductive specialists or infertility clinic (16.82%), were considered major barriers to discussing fertility issues. @*Conclusion@#Although more than 50% of the respondents thought that cancer treatment is more important than fertility preservation and it is complex and difficult, the Korean breast surgical oncologists were generally encouraging when discussing fertility issues with young breast cancer patients. Hence, breast clinicians should share with young patients the updated evidence regarding the feasibility and safety of pregnancy after cancer treatment and the available options so that the best decisions can be made.

5.
Journal of Breast Disease ; (2): 51-57, 2020.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-835613

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Although increasing body mass index (BMI) is regarded as a potential risk factor for breast cancer (BC) in postmenopausal women, research on premenopausal women has produced conflicting results. We investigated the association between BMI and BC according to menopausal status in Korean. @*Methods@#We analyzed clinical data from 186,835 women aged 20 years or older between 2003 and 2008 using a sample cohort from the national database in Korea. We identified women newly diagnosed with BC and estimated the risk of BC according to BMI (kg/m2). Subjects were categorized into five groups according to World Health Organization recommendations for Asians: underweight, <18.5 kg/m2; normal weight, 18.5–22.9 kg/m2; overweight, 23.0–24.9 kg/m2; obese class I, 25.0–29.9 kg/m2; and obese class II, ≥30.0 kg/m2. @*Results@#1,372 women in the cohort were newly diagnosed with BC. A positive relationship between BMI and BC was detected and the hazard ratio in each group compared with the normal weight group was 0.57 (95% CI, 0.42–0.78), 1.27 (1.11–1.45), 1.25 (1.09–1.44), and 1.28 (0.95–1.73), respectively. BMI was determined to be an important risk factor for BC in postmenopausal women (p for trend was 0.015). We failed to find a significant correlation between BMI and BC in premenopausal women. @*Conclusion@#BMI is positively associated with BC in postmenopausal Korean women.

6.
Journal of Breast Cancer ; : 400-403, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-194952

ABSTRACT

Two consecutive surveys for breast surgeons in Korea were conducted to comprehend the practice patterns and perceptions on margin status after breast-conserving surgery. The surveys were conducted online in 2014 (initial) and 2016 (follow-up). A total of 126 and 88 responses were obtained in the initial and follow-up survey, respectively. More than 80% of the respondents replied to routinely apply frozen section biopsy for intraoperative margin assessment in both surveys. Re-excision recommendations of the margin for invasive cancer significantly changed from a close margin to a positive margin over time (p=0.033). Most of the respondents (73.8%) defined a negative margin as “no ink on tumor” in invasive cancer, whereas more diverse responses were observed in ductal carcinoma in situ cases. The influence of guideline establishment for negative margins has been identified. A high uptake rate of intraoperative frozen section biopsy was noted and routine use needs reconsideration.


Subject(s)
Biopsy , Breast , Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating , Follow-Up Studies , Frozen Sections , Ink , Korea , Mastectomy, Segmental , Surgeons , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Korean Journal of Endocrine Surgery ; : 18-23, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-182984

ABSTRACT

Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is commonly accompanied by cervical lymph node metastasis, whereas metastases to the retropharyngeal lymph nodes (RPN) are rare. Radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation is recommended for detection and treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). However, in some cases of iodine-negative DTC, F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) can aid in detection of additional lesions. We report on a patient with PTC who had retropharyngeal node involvement with iodine-negative features and low thyroglobulin level at the time of diagnosis but with metastasis identified on FDG PET/CT.


Subject(s)
Humans , Diagnosis , Electrons , Iodine , Lymph Nodes , Neoplasm Metastasis , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography , Thyroglobulin , Thyroid Gland , Thyroid Neoplasms
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