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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-833476

ABSTRACT

Objective@#: Spine surgery is associated with higher morbidity and mortality rates in elderly patients. The modified Frailty Index (mFI) is an evaluation tool to determine the frailty of an individual and how preoperative status may impact postoperative survival and outcomes. This study aimed to determine the usefulness of mFI in predicting postoperative complications in patients aged ≥75 years undergoing surgery with instrumentation. @*Methods@#: We retrospectively reviewed the perioperative course of 137 patients who underwent thoracolumbar-instrumentation spine surgery between 2011 and 2016. The preoperative risk factors were the 11 variables of the mFI, as well as body mass index (kg/cm2), preoperative hemoglobin, platelet, albumin, creatinine, anesthesia time, operation time, estimated blood loss, and transfusion amount. The 60-day occurrences of complication rates were used for outcome assessment. @*Results@#: Major complications after spinal instrumentation surgery occurred in 34 of 138 patients (24.6%). The mean mFI score was 0.18±0.12. When we divided patients into a pre-frail group (mFI, 0.09–0.18; n=94) and a frail group (mFI ≥0.27; n=44), only the rate of sepsis was statistically higher in the frail group than in the pre-frail group. There were significantly more major complications in patients with low albumin levels or in patients with infection or who had experienced trauma. The mFI was a more useful predictor of postoperative complications than the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status score. @*Conclusion@#: The mFI can successfully predict postoperative morbidity and mortality in patients aged ≥75 years undergoing spine surgery. The mFI improves perioperative risk stratification that provides important information to assist in the preoperative counselling of patients and their families.

2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-759989

ABSTRACT

Vertebral artery injuries associated with C1 lateral mass screw insertion rarely occur during C1-2 fusion. The posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) is uncommonly located at the C1 lateral mass insertion position. A 71-year-old woman with atlanto-axial subluxation and cord compression underwent C1-2 fusion. Sixth nerve palsy and diplopia were detected postoperatively, and decreased consciousness occurred on postoperative day 4. Brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) revealed PICA infarction. In the preoperative CT angiography, the PICA originated between the C1 and C2 level. In the postoperative CT scan, the PICA was not visible. The patient was treated conservatively for two weeks and recovered. PICA originating between the C1 and C2 level comprises 1.1–1.3% of cases. Therefore, vertebral artery anomalies should be evaluated prior to C1-2 fusion to prevent vessel injuries.


Subject(s)
Abducens Nerve Diseases , Aged , Angiography , Arteries , Brain , Brain Infarction , Consciousness , Diplopia , Female , Humans , Infarction , Pica , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Vertebral Artery
3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-759988

ABSTRACT

Involuntary movement of the cervical spine can cause damage to the cervical spinal cord. Cervical myelopathy may occur at an early age in involuntary movement disorders, such as tics. We report the case of a 21-year-old man with Tourette syndrome, who developed progressive quadriparesis, which was more severe in the upper extremities. The patient had abnormal motor tics with hyperflexion and hyperextension of the cervical spine for more than 10 years. High-signal intensity intramedullary lesions were observed at C3-4-5-6 level on T2 weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Examinations were performed for high-signal intensity intramedullary lesions that may occur at a young age, but no other diseases were detected. Botulinum toxin injection to the neck musculature and medication for tic disorders were administered. However, the myelopathy was further aggravated, as the involuntary cervical movement still remained. Therefore, laminoplasty was performed at C3-4-5-6, with posterior fixation at C2-3-4-5-6-7 to alleviate the symptoms. The neurological signs and symptoms improved dramatically. The management of tic disorders should be the first priority during treatment. However, surgical treatment may be necessary, if symptoms worsen after appropriate treatment.


Subject(s)
Botulinum Toxins , Cervical Cord , Dyskinesias , Humans , Laminoplasty , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Neck , Quadriplegia , Spinal Cord Diseases , Spine , Spondylosis , Tic Disorders , Tics , Tourette Syndrome , Upper Extremity , Young Adult
4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-713252

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of stent-assisted coil embolization using only a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor (tirofiban). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed patients with a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured wide-necked intracranial aneurysms who were treated by stent-assisted coil embolization. In all patients, the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor tirofiban was administered just before stent deployment. Electronic medical records for these patients were reviewed for peri-procedural complications and extra-ventricular drainage catheter related hemorrhage, as well as Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) at discharge, 3 months, and 6 months follow-up were recorded. RESULTS: Fifty-one aneurysms in 50 patients were treated. The mean patient age was 64.9 years. Eighteen patients (36%) received a World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grade of 4 or 5. The mean aneurysm size was 9.48 mm and mean dome-to-neck ratio was 1.06. No intraoperative aneurysm ruptures occurred, although five (10%) episodes of asymptomatic stent thrombosis did occur. Three patients experienced a delayed thrombo-embolic event and two a delayed hemorrhagic event. Immediate radiologic assessment indicated a complete occlusion in 29 patients, a residual neck in 19, and a residual sac in 3. Four patients (8%) died. Sixteen patients (32%) experienced a poor GOS (< 4). Two aneurysms were recanalized during the follow-up period (mean, 19 months for clinical and 18 months for angiographic follow-up). CONCLUSION: Treatment of ruptured wide-necked intracranial aneurysms via stent-assisted coil embolization with a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor alone was found to be relatively safe and efficient.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Catheters , Drainage , Electronic Health Records , Embolization, Therapeutic , Endovascular Procedures , Follow-Up Studies , Glasgow Outcome Scale , Glycoproteins , Hemorrhage , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Neck , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors , Retrospective Studies , Rupture , Stents , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage , Thrombosis
5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-713250

ABSTRACT

A 50-year-old woman reported to the emergency department with thunderclap headache and vomiting. Non-enhanced brain computed tomography (CT) showed a subarachnoid hemorrhage of Hunt-Hess Grade II and Fisher Grade III. Brain angiography CT and transfemoral cerebral angiography (TFCA) revealed an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery. A direct neck clipping was performed using the pterional approach. The post-operation CT was uneventful. Six days postoperatively, the patient became lethargic. The mean velocity (cm/s) of the middle cerebral artery peaked at 173 cm/s on the right side and 167 cm/s on the left. A TFCA revealed decreased perfusion in both recurrent arteries of Heubner (RAH), but no occlusion in either. Intra-arterial nimodipine injection was administered. On the 7th postoperative day, CT demonstrated a newly developed low-density lesion in the RAH territory bilaterally. The cause of the infarction was attributed to decreased perfusion caused by cerebral vasospasm. The patient was discharged with no definite neurologic deficit except for mild cognitive disorder.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Angiography , Arteries , Brain , Cerebral Angiography , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Headache Disorders, Primary , Humans , Infarction , Infarction, Anterior Cerebral Artery , Intracranial Aneurysm , Middle Aged , Middle Cerebral Artery , Neck , Neurologic Manifestations , Nimodipine , Perfusion , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage , Vasospasm, Intracranial , Vomiting
6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-717707

ABSTRACT

Deep neck infections (DNIs) are mainly caused by dental caries, tonsillitis, and pharyngitis; however, DNIs can also occur after head and neck trauma. A 79-year-old male patient underwent a craniectomy due to an acute subdural hematoma. The patient was unconscious and continued to have a fever, but no clear cause was found. On postoperative day 9, he suddenly showed redness and swelling on the anterior neck. Enhanced computed tomography of the pharynx revealed tracheal necrosis and an abscess in the surrounding area. An incision and drainage were performed and Enterobacter aerogenes and E. faecalis were identified. The infection was controlled after antibiotic treatment. High endotracheal tube cuff pressure was suspected as the cause of the tracheal infection. Although DNIs are difficult to predict in patients who cannot report their symptoms due to unconsciousness, prevention and rapid diagnosis are important, as DNIs have serious side effects.


Subject(s)
Abscess , Aged , Brain Injuries , Brain , Dental Caries , Diagnosis , Drainage , Enterobacter aerogenes , Fever , Head , Hematoma, Subdural, Acute , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal , Male , Neck , Necrosis , Palatine Tonsil , Pharyngitis , Pharynx , Tonsillitis , Unconsciousness
7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-717094

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Dapsone (diaminodiphenyl sulfone, DDS) is currently used to treat leprosy, malaria, dermatitis herpetiformis, and other diseases. It is also used to treat pneumocystis pneumonia and Toxoplasma gondii infection in HIV-positive patients. The most common adverse effect of DDS is methemoglobinemia from oxidative stress. Ascorbic acid is an antioxidant and reducing agent that scavenges the free radicals produced by oxidative stress. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of ascorbic acid in the treatment of DDS induced methemoglobinemia. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: an ascorbic acid group, a methylene blue (MB) group, and a control group. After DDS (40 mg/kg) treatment via oral gavage, ascorbic acid (15 mg/kg), MB (1 mg/kg), or normal saline were administered via tail vein injection. Depending on the duration of the DDS treatment, blood methemoglobin levels, as well as the nitric oxide levels and catalase activity, were measured at 60, 120, or 180 minutes after DDS administration. RESULTS: Methemoglobin concentrations in the ascorbic acid and MB groups were significantly lower compared to those in the control group across multiple time points. The plasma nitric oxide levels and catalase activity were not different among the groups or time points. CONCLUSION: Intravenous ascorbic acid administration is effective in treating DDS-induced methemoglobinemia in a murine model.


Subject(s)
Animals , Ascorbic Acid , Catalase , Dapsone , Dermatitis Herpetiformis , Free Radicals , Humans , Leprosy , Malaria , Male , Methemoglobin , Methemoglobinemia , Methylene Blue , Nitric Oxide , Oxidative Stress , Plasma , Pneumonia, Pneumocystis , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Tail , Toxoplasmosis , Veins
8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-727937

ABSTRACT

Cilostazol is a selective inhibitor of type 3 phosphodiesterase (PDE3) and has been widely used as an antiplatelet agent. Cilostazol mediates this activity through effects on the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling cascade. Recently, it has attracted attention as a neuroprotective agent. However, little is known about cilostazol's effect on excitotoxicity induced neuronal cell death. Therefore, this study evaluated the neuroprotective effect of cilostazol treatment against hippocampal neuronal damage in a mouse model of kainic acid (KA)-induced neuronal loss. Cilostazol pretreatment reduced KA-induced seizure scores and hippocampal neuron death. In addition, cilostazol pretreatment increased cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and decreased neuroinflammation. These observations suggest that cilostazol may have beneficial therapeutic effects on seizure activity and other neurological diseases associated with excitotoxicity.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate , Animals , Cell Death , Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein , Hippocampus , Kainic Acid , Mice , Neurons , Neuroprotective Agents , Phosphorylation , Seizures , Therapeutic Uses
9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-148437

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Intracranial vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms are rare lesions that are considered an important cause of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage. We report our decade-long experience in treating ruptured intracranial vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This retrospective single-center study included 21 consecutive patients between February 2005 and March 2015. Their clinical features included radiologic finding at the initial examination, treatment modality, functional outcome at the last follow-up, mortality, and radiologic outcome at more than 6 months after the initial treatment. RESULTS: All 16 aneurysms were treated endovascularly; aneurysm trapping was performed in 9 patients and vascular reconstruction was performed in 7 patients. For 6 aneurysms involving the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA), the modalities of treatment were aneurysm trapping in 3 patients and vascular reconstruction in 3 patients. The mean duration of follow-up was 29 months (range, 6–70 months). Five patients expired, indicating a mortality rate of 31%. In surviving patients, the unfavorable outcome rate (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] > 2) was 36%. The overall mean mRS for survivors was 1.8. Angiographic follow-up in 11 survivors at 13 months, (range, 6–46 months) revealed recanalization of the aneurysm in one patient. CONCLUSIONS: Ruptured intracranial vertebral artery dissecting aneurysm is associated with poor functional outcome and high mortality. More immediate treatments are needed due to the high rebleeding rate in this disease condition. Endovascular treatment may be a useful option for ruptured intracranial vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Aneurysm, Dissecting , Arteries , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Mortality , Retrospective Studies , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage , Survivors , Vertebral Artery
10.
Korean Journal of Spine ; : 162-165, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-222733

ABSTRACT

Thymoma and thymic carcinoma are rare epithelial tumors that originate from the thymus gland. Extrathoracic metastases occur in the liver, kidney, and bone in 1% to 15% of patients. Although thymoma and thymic carcinoma exhibit highly aggressive biological behavior, spinal metastasis is rare. We describe a 78-year-old man with left wrist and grasp weakness that occurred 7 days before admission. The patient underwent thymoma surgery 7 years ago and was cured. Magnetic resonance images showed a rim-enhanced mass in the C6–7–T1 epidural space. C6–7–T1 laminectomy was performed and the mass was removed. Histological examination was performed and patient was diagnosed with metastatic thymoma. The previous reported case occurred with involvement of the vertebral body or posterior element, but our case was mostly rim-enhanced and appeared as an abscess and intradural extramedullary tumor.


Subject(s)
Abscess , Aged , Epidural Abscess , Epidural Space , Hand Strength , Humans , Kidney , Laminectomy , Liver , Neoplasm Metastasis , Thymoma , Thymus Gland , Wrist
11.
Korean Journal of Spine ; : 120-123, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-13812

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Infectious spondylitis is mostly managed by appropriate antibiotic treatment options, and some patients may require surgical interventions. However, surgical interventions that use spinal instrumentation to correct the mechanical instability may be associated with the risk of an increase in the recurrence rate. In this study, we investigated whether spinal instrumentation effects on recurrence of infectious spondylitis. METHODS: The study was conducted as a retrospective study by dividing the subjects into the noninstrumentation surgery and instrumentation surgery groups among a total of 95 patients who had received surgical interventions in infectious spondylitis from 2009 to 2014. The study investigated patient variables such as underlying illness, presumed source of infection, clinical data, laboratory and radiological data, and ultimate outcome, and compared them between the 2 groups. RESULTS: In the 95 patients, instrumentation was not used in 21 patients but it was used in 74 patients. When the disease involved ≥3 vertebral bodies, lumbosacral level and epidural part, noninstrumentation surgery was mainly conducted, but when the disease involved the thoracic level and psoas muscle part, instrumentation surgery was mainly conducted. However, there were no differences between the 2 groups in terms of the recurrence rate and the incidence of primary failure. CONCLUSION: The use of instrumentation in treating infectious spondylitis was determined by the level of involvement and part of the infection, but the use of instrumentation did not cause any increases in the recurrence rate and the incidence of primary failure.


Subject(s)
Decision Making , Humans , Incidence , Psoas Muscles , Recurrence , Retrospective Studies , Spondylitis
12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-205825

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The risk factors for surgical site infections (SSIs) after cranioplasty following decompressive craniectomy remain unclear. The goal of this study was to analyze the risk factors related to developing SSIs after cranioplasty and to suggest valuable predictors. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted of patients who underwent cranioplasty following decompressive craniectomy at our institution from January 2011 to December 2014, a total of 78 patients who underwent 78 cranioplasties. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out to determine possible risk factors related to developing SSIs. We analyzed both patient-specific and surgery-specific factors. RESULTS: The overall rate of SSIs was 9.0% (7/78). SSIs after cranioplasty were significantly related to being female, having the primary etiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and having had a bilateral cranioplasty in the univariate analysis. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that being female [odds ratio (OR) 5.98, p=0.000] and having had a bilateral cranioplasty (OR 4.00, p=0.001) significantly increased the risk of SSIs. CONCLUSION: Based on our data, cranioplasty following decompressive craniectomy is associated with a high incidence of SSI. Being female, having a primary etiology of TBI and having had a bilateral cranioplasty may be risk factors for surgical site infections after cranioplasty.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries , Decompressive Craniectomy , Female , Humans , Incidence , Logistic Models , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Surgical Wound Infection
13.
Anatomy & Cell Biology ; : 262-267, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-208407

ABSTRACT

Recent neuroimaging studies indicate that learning a novel motor skill induces plastic changes in the brain structures of both gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) that are associated with a specific practice. We previously reported an increased volume of vermian lobules VI-VII (declive, folium, and tuber) in elite basketball athletes who require coordination for dribbling and shooting a ball, which awakened the central role of the cerebellum in motor coordination. However, the precise factor contributing to the increased volume was not determined. In the present study, we compared the volumes of the GM and WM in the sub-regions of the cerebellar vermis based on manual voxel analysis with the ImageJ program. We found significantly larger WM volumes of vermian lobules VI-VII (declive, folium, and tuber) in elite basketball athletes in response to long-term intensive motor learning. We suggest that the larger WM volumes of this region in elite basketball athletes represent a motor learning-induced plastic change, and that the WM of this region likely plays a critical role in coordination. This finding will contribute to gaining a deeper understanding of motor learning-evoked WM plasticity.


Subject(s)
Athletes , Basketball , Brain , Cerebellum , Humans , Learning , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Motor Skills , Neuroimaging , Plastics
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-193371

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The presence of a cerebral aneurysm remnant after surgical clipping is associated with a risk of regrowth or rupture. For these recurred aneurysms, coil embolization can be considered as a treatment option. We retrospectively reviewed cases of ruptured or regrown aneurysms after clipping treated by endovascular coil embolization. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective review of patients with ruptured or recurred aneurysm after clipping, who underwent coil embolization between January 1995 and December 2013. We evaluated clinical information and the outcomes of these cases. RESULTS: Eight patients were treated by endovascular coil embolization after surgical clipping. Six aneurysms were located in the anterior communicating artery, one in the posterior communicating artery, and one in the middle cerebral artery bifurcation. All patients were initially treated by surgical clipping because of a ruptured aneurysm. Aneurysm recurrence at the initial clipping site was detected in all cases. The median interval from initial to second presentation was 42 months. In four patients, aneurysms were detected before rupture and the four remaining patients presented with recurrent subarachnoid hemorrhage. All patients were treated by coil embolization and showed successful occlusion of aneurysms without complications. CONCLUSION: Endovascular coil embolization can be a safe and successful treatment option for recurred aneurysms after clipping.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Aneurysm, Ruptured , Arteries , Embolization, Therapeutic , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Middle Cerebral Artery , Recurrence , Retrospective Studies , Rupture , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage , Surgical Instruments
16.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-140387

ABSTRACT

Spinal subdural hematoma is a rarely reported disease and spontaneous spinal subdural hematomas (SSDH) without underlying pathological changes are even rarer. The patients usually show typical symtoms such as back pain, quadriplegia, paraplegia or sensory change. But rarely, patients may show atypical symptoms such as hemiparesis and misdiagnosed to cerebrovascular accident. We recently experienced a case of SSDH, where the patient initially showed vague symptoms, such as the sudden onset of headache which we initially misdiagnosed as subarachnoid hemorrhage. In this case, the headache of patient improved but the neck pain persisted until hospital day 5. Therefre, we conducted the MRI of cervical spine and finally confirmed SSDH. The patient was managed conservatively and improved without recurrence. In this case report, we discuss the clinical features of SSDH with emphasis on the importance of an early diagnosis.


Subject(s)
Back Pain , Diagnosis , Early Diagnosis , Headache , Hematoma, Subdural, Spinal , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Neck Pain , Paraplegia , Paresis , Quadriplegia , Recurrence , Spine , Stroke , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
17.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-140386

ABSTRACT

Spinal subdural hematoma is a rarely reported disease and spontaneous spinal subdural hematomas (SSDH) without underlying pathological changes are even rarer. The patients usually show typical symtoms such as back pain, quadriplegia, paraplegia or sensory change. But rarely, patients may show atypical symptoms such as hemiparesis and misdiagnosed to cerebrovascular accident. We recently experienced a case of SSDH, where the patient initially showed vague symptoms, such as the sudden onset of headache which we initially misdiagnosed as subarachnoid hemorrhage. In this case, the headache of patient improved but the neck pain persisted until hospital day 5. Therefre, we conducted the MRI of cervical spine and finally confirmed SSDH. The patient was managed conservatively and improved without recurrence. In this case report, we discuss the clinical features of SSDH with emphasis on the importance of an early diagnosis.


Subject(s)
Back Pain , Diagnosis , Early Diagnosis , Headache , Hematoma, Subdural, Spinal , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Neck Pain , Paraplegia , Paresis , Quadriplegia , Recurrence , Spine , Stroke , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-76404

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this clinical practice guideline (CPG) is to provide current and comprehensive recommendations for the medical and surgical management of primary intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Since the release of the first Korean CPGs for stroke, evidence has been accumulated in the management of ICH, such as intracranial pressure control and minimally invasive surgery, and it needs to be reflected in the updated version. The Quality Control Committee at the Korean Society of cerebrovascular Surgeons and the Writing Group at the Clinical Research Center for Stroke (CRCS) systematically reviewed relevant literature and major published guidelines between June 2007 and June 2013. Based on the published evidence, recommendations were synthesized, and the level of evidence and the grade of the recommendation were determined using the methods adapted from CRCS. A draft guideline was scrutinized by expert peer reviewers and also discussed at an expert consensus meeting until final agreement was achieved. CPGs based on scientific evidence are presented for the medical and surgical management of patients presenting with primary ICH. This CPG describes the current pertinent recommendations and suggests Korean recommendations for the medical and surgical management of a patient with primary ICH.


Subject(s)
Cerebral Hemorrhage , Consensus , Humans , Intracranial Pressure , Korea , Peer Review , Quality Control , Stroke , Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures , Writing
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-32508

ABSTRACT

Intracranial traumatic pseudoaneurysms are rare, and their vessel structures are immature and easy to disrupt, especially in children. Furthermore, it is difficult to diagnose and treat, which is a characteristic of traumatic pseudoaneurysm. In this study, the authors described a traumatic pseudoaneurysm in A2 segment of anterior cerebral artery, and the treatment with stent for structural stability of vessel.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm, False , Anterior Cerebral Artery , Carotid Artery Injuries , Child , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Stents
20.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-653142

ABSTRACT

Although invasive fungal infections of the paranasal sinuses have been well described in immunocompromised patients, those affecting the ear and temporal bone are uncommon. For these diseases, early suspicion and proving the invasiveness of the fungus with biopsy are very important. Systemic antifungal treatment and wide surgical debridement are the treatment of choice. However, a latent infection is always at risk during the long-term medical therapy. We report, with a literature review, a case of brain abscess from invasive fungal otitis media in an immunocompromised patient who has shown improvement with earlier antifungal medication and surgical debridement.


Subject(s)
Biopsy , Brain Abscess , Debridement , Ear , Facial Paralysis , Fungi , Immunocompromised Host , Otitis Media , Paranasal Sinuses , Temporal Bone
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