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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-765393

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We introduce innovative method of cervical column reconstruction and performed the reconstruction with a flanged titanium mesh cage (TMC) instead of a plate after anterior corpectomy for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) and an ossified posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). METHODS: Fifty patients with CSM or OPLL who underwent anterior cervical reconstruction with a flanged TMC were investigated retrospectively. Odom’s criteria were used to assess the clinical outcomes. The radiographic evaluation included TMC subsidence, fusion status, and interbody height. Thirty-eight patients underwent single-level and 12 patients underwent two-level corpectomy with a mean follow-up period of 16.8 months. RESULTS: In all, 19 patients (38%) had excellent outcomes and 25 patients (50%) had good outcomes. Two patients (4%) in whom C5 palsy occurred were categorized as poor. The fusion rate at the last follow-up was 98%, and the severe subsidence rate was 34%. No differences in subsidence were observed among Odom’s criteria or between the single-level and two-level corpectomy groups. CONCLUSION: The satisfactory outcomes in this study indicate that the flanged TMC is an effective graft for cervical reconstruction.


Subject(s)
Cervical Vertebrae , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Longitudinal Ligaments , Methods , Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament , Paralysis , Retrospective Studies , Spinal Cord Diseases , Spondylosis , Titanium , Transplants
2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-788819

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We introduce innovative method of cervical column reconstruction and performed the reconstruction with a flanged titanium mesh cage (TMC) instead of a plate after anterior corpectomy for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) and an ossified posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL).METHODS: Fifty patients with CSM or OPLL who underwent anterior cervical reconstruction with a flanged TMC were investigated retrospectively. Odom’s criteria were used to assess the clinical outcomes. The radiographic evaluation included TMC subsidence, fusion status, and interbody height. Thirty-eight patients underwent single-level and 12 patients underwent two-level corpectomy with a mean follow-up period of 16.8 months.RESULTS: In all, 19 patients (38%) had excellent outcomes and 25 patients (50%) had good outcomes. Two patients (4%) in whom C5 palsy occurred were categorized as poor. The fusion rate at the last follow-up was 98%, and the severe subsidence rate was 34%. No differences in subsidence were observed among Odom’s criteria or between the single-level and two-level corpectomy groups.CONCLUSION: The satisfactory outcomes in this study indicate that the flanged TMC is an effective graft for cervical reconstruction.


Subject(s)
Cervical Vertebrae , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Longitudinal Ligaments , Methods , Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament , Paralysis , Retrospective Studies , Spinal Cord Diseases , Spondylosis , Titanium , Transplants
3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-785930

ABSTRACT

We present the case of a 38-year-old male who complained of repeated dizziness and syncope. Rotational vertebral artery syndrome (RVAS) was diagnosed via videonystagmoraphy (VNG), computed tomography angiography (CTA) and three-position digital subtraction angiography (DSA). In the neutral position, CTA and DSA revealed left vertebral artery (VA) stenosis at the C2 transverse foramen and right VA hypoplasia. When the head was turned to the right, the blood flow stopped at the C2 level. The bony structure around the VA at the C2 transverse foramen was decompressed via an anterior surgical approach, and the symptoms resolved. This case present the precise stenotic point evaluation by three-position DSA is crucial for the planning of surgical treatment.


Subject(s)
Adult , Angiography , Angiography, Digital Subtraction , Constriction, Pathologic , Decompression , Dizziness , Head , Humans , Male , Syncope , Vertebral Artery
4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-759976

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Osteoporosis is one of the most common causes of vertebral compression fractures (VCFs). Teriparatide, a recombinant human parathyroid hormone, is the first anabolic agent for the treatment of osteoporosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether 3 months of teriparatide could be effective for patients with osteoporotic VCF at the thoracolumbar spine. METHODS: We reviewed 25 patients with thoracolumbar osteoporotic compression fractures between July 2012 and October 2016 who could be followed up for more than 1 year. Patients were divided into 2 groups depending on the use of teriparatide: 14 patients received teriparatide through subcutaneous injection (group I) and 11 patients did not receive teriparatide (group II). Demographic data, bone mineral density, hospitalization period, changes in the visual analogue scale (VAS) score, body mass index, and medical history such as smoking, alcohol, diabetes, and steroid usage were reviewed. Radiographs were also reviewed to evaluate vertebral body compression percentages and kyphotic angles. RESULTS: Overall changes of VAS score between injury and follow-up were statistically improved in both groups at 2 to 3 weeks post-injury. However, difference in VAS improvement at a specific time between the 2 groups was not statistically significant. Overall kyphotic angle and compression percentage between injury and follow-up time were increased in group II than those in group I, although the difference between the 2 groups was not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Three-month of teriparatide did not show protective effects on progression of fractured vertebral body collapse or kyphotic changes in patients with osteoporosis.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , Bone Density , Follow-Up Studies , Fractures, Compression , Hospitalization , Humans , Injections, Subcutaneous , Osteoporosis , Osteoporotic Fractures , Parathyroid Hormone , Smoke , Smoking , Spine , Teriparatide , Thoracic Vertebrae , Treatment Outcome
5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-717476

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Rapid expansion of subacute subdural hematomas (saSDHs) is an uncommon complication in the course of acute subdural hematomas (SDHs). The current study evaluated relevant factors and treatment methods for saSDHs with neurologic deterioration and mass effect. METHODS: A saSDHs was chronologically defined as an SDH occurring 4 to 21 days after head trauma. All cases of surgically treated SDHs were retrieved from the head trauma bank at our institution. Twenty-three patients with expanding saSDHs who met the following criteria were enrolled in the study: defined age of the hematoma, clinical deterioration, and radiological expansion of the hematoma. Cases were analyzed according to demographic factors, trauma mechanism, medical co-morbidity, and surgical method. RESULTS: Expanding saSDHs occurred more often in older (≥60 years old) than in younger patients (69.6% vs. 30.4%, respectively); they also occurred more often in men than in women (64% vs. 36%, respectively). Antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy was used in 52% of patients. The Glasgow Coma Scale score was 13 at the time of the trauma and deteriorated to 11 at the time of surgery. The mean time from the trauma to development of the expanding saSDH from an SDH was 13.3 days. Regarding surgical methods, closed-system drainage was performed in 22 patients, and only one patient underwent craniotomy with hematoma removal. All patients exhibited neurological improvements after surgery. CONCLUSION: An expanding saSDH usually occurs around 13 days after trauma in older adults. Minimal trephination with closed-system drainage can be used to manage an expanding saSDHs.


Subject(s)
Adult , Catheters , Craniocerebral Trauma , Craniotomy , Demography , Drainage , Female , Glasgow Coma Scale , Hematoma , Hematoma, Subdural , Hematoma, Subdural, Acute , Humans , Male , Methods , Trephining
6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-717044

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Protocols for posterior circulation ischemic stroke have not been established by randomized clinical trials. Mechanical endovascular thrombectomy (MET) devices are evolving, and many of these devices already developed or in development are suitable for posterior circulation MET. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We investigated the medical records of patients who underwent MET for posterior circulation ischemic stroke from January 2012 to August 2016. Fifteen patients were included. MET was performed in patients with or without injected intravenous tissue plasminogen activator. MET was considered in patients with a National Institute of Health Stroke Scale score of 4 or more, older than 18 years, with definite occlusion of the basilar artery or posterior cerebral artery (PCA), and who arrived at the hospital within 24 hours from onset. RESULTS: The direct catheter aspiration technique was used in five cases, and the stent retrieval technique was used in seven cases. The stent retrieval technique with the direct aspiration technique was used in three cases. Recanalization failed in two cases. Basilar occlusion without PCA involvement is the only effective factor of successful recanalization (p = 0.03). Successful recanalization (p = 0.005) and the presence of a posterior communicating artery (p = 0.005) affected the good outcome at discharge. CONCLUSION: An early diagnosis and active MET may improve the patient outcome. MET may help recanalization and good flow restoration and the potential for a good outcome.


Subject(s)
Arteries , Basilar Artery , Catheters , Early Diagnosis , Humans , Medical Records , Passive Cutaneous Anaphylaxis , Posterior Cerebral Artery , Stents , Stroke , Thrombectomy , Tissue Plasminogen Activator
7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-765293

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect for biodegradable screws containing bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) in an osteoporotic rat model. METHODS: Twenty-four female Wistar rat (250–300 g, 12 weeks of age) were randomized into four groups. Three groups underwent bilateral ovariectomy (OVX). Biodegradable screws with or without BMP-2 were inserted in the proximal tibia in two implantation groups. The extracted proximal metaphysis of the tibiae were scanned by exo-vivo micro-computed tomography. Evaluated parameters included bone mineral density (BMD), trabecular bone volume (BV/TV), trabecular number, trabecular thickness, and trabecular separation (Tb.Sp). The tibia samples were pathologically evaluated by staining with by Hematoxylin and Eosin, and trichrome. RESULTS: Trabecular formation near screw insertion site was evident only in rats receiving BMP-2 screws. BMD and BV/TV significantly differed between controls and the OVX and OVX with screw groups. However, there were no significant differences between control and OVX with screw BMP groups. Tb.Sp significantly differed between control and OVX and OVX with screw groups (p < 0.05), and between the OVX and OVX with screw BMP group (p < 0.05), with no statistically significant difference between control and OVX with screw BMP groups. Over the 12 weeks after surgery, bone lamellae in direct contact with the screw developed more extensive and thicker trabecular bone around the implant in the OVX with screw BMP group compared to the OVX with screw group. CONCLUSION: Biodegradable screws containing BMP-2 improve nearby bone conditions and enhance ostoeintegration between the implant and the osteoporotic bone.


Subject(s)
Animals , Bone Density , Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 , Eosine Yellowish-(YS) , Female , Hematoxylin , Humans , Models, Animal , Osteoporosis , Ovariectomy , Rats , Tibia
8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-788723

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect for biodegradable screws containing bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) in an osteoporotic rat model.METHODS: Twenty-four female Wistar rat (250–300 g, 12 weeks of age) were randomized into four groups. Three groups underwent bilateral ovariectomy (OVX). Biodegradable screws with or without BMP-2 were inserted in the proximal tibia in two implantation groups. The extracted proximal metaphysis of the tibiae were scanned by exo-vivo micro-computed tomography. Evaluated parameters included bone mineral density (BMD), trabecular bone volume (BV/TV), trabecular number, trabecular thickness, and trabecular separation (Tb.Sp). The tibia samples were pathologically evaluated by staining with by Hematoxylin and Eosin, and trichrome.RESULTS: Trabecular formation near screw insertion site was evident only in rats receiving BMP-2 screws. BMD and BV/TV significantly differed between controls and the OVX and OVX with screw groups. However, there were no significant differences between control and OVX with screw BMP groups. Tb.Sp significantly differed between control and OVX and OVX with screw groups (p < 0.05), and between the OVX and OVX with screw BMP group (p < 0.05), with no statistically significant difference between control and OVX with screw BMP groups. Over the 12 weeks after surgery, bone lamellae in direct contact with the screw developed more extensive and thicker trabecular bone around the implant in the OVX with screw BMP group compared to the OVX with screw group.CONCLUSION: Biodegradable screws containing BMP-2 improve nearby bone conditions and enhance ostoeintegration between the implant and the osteoporotic bone.


Subject(s)
Animals , Bone Density , Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 , Eosine Yellowish-(YS) , Female , Hematoxylin , Humans , Models, Animal , Osteoporosis , Ovariectomy , Rats , Tibia
9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-203612

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Head injury is a leading cause of death and disability in subjects who suffer a traumatic accident. Contralateral hematomas after surgery for traumatic brain injury are rare. However, an unrecognized, these hematomas can cause devastating results. We presented our experience of these patients and discussed diagnosis and management. METHODS: This study included 12 traumatic patients with acute traumatic brain injury who developed delayed contralateral hematoma after evacuation of an acute hematoma. Clinical and radiographic data was obtained through review of medical records and radiographs retrospectively. RESULTS: Ten males and two females were included in the study. Ten (83.3%) patients had severe head injury (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score <8). Intraoperative brain swelling during removal of the traumatic subdural hematoma was noted in 10 (83.3%) patients. A skull fracture on the side contralateral to the acute hematoma was noted on computed tomography (CT) scans of nine (75%) patients. Three (33.3%) patients with severe head injury (GCS <8) died. Only (10%) one patient with a severe head injury had less severe disability. CONCLUSION: A postoperative CT scan is essential in patients with acute traumatic brain injury and a contralateral skull fracture or a low GCS score. Our results indicated that it is very important to evaluate this rare but potentially devastating complication.


Subject(s)
Brain Edema , Brain Injuries , Cause of Death , Coma , Craniocerebral Trauma , Craniotomy , Decompressive Craniectomy , Diagnosis , Female , Hematoma , Hematoma, Subdural , Humans , Male , Medical Records , Postoperative Hemorrhage , Retrospective Studies , Skull Fractures , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-122133

ABSTRACT

Multiple primary or secondary malignancies after anticancer therapy were recently reported to be increasing in frequency. The authors describe a case of metachronous metastatic pulmonary basaloid carcinoma to the central nervous system that was discovered after chemotherapy and radiation therapy for cervical uterine carcinoma. Two different types of cancer developed within some interval. There's the possibility that a secondary pulmonary neoplasm developed after the chemotherapy and radiotherapy conducted as cervical cancer treatment.


Subject(s)
Central Nervous System , Drug Therapy , Lung Neoplasms , Neoplasm Metastasis , Neoplasms, Second Primary , Radiotherapy , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-120948

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We report on the technical feasibility and limitations of the transmanubrial approach for cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) lesions and emphasize the advantage of bisecting the upper part of the manubrium in an inverted Y-shape. METHODS: Thirteen patients who underwent the fourteen transmanubrial approach for various CTJ lesions were enrolled during 2005-2014. For the evaluation of the accessibility for the CTJ lesion, we analyzed the two parallel line defined as a straight line parallel to the inferior and superior plateau of the upper and lower healthy vertebrae, the angle of the two parallel lines and the distance from the sternal notch to lines at the sternum on preoperative magnetic resonance images. Surgical limitations and perspectives, as well as postoperative clinical outcomes were evaluated retrospectively. RESULTS: The CTJ lesions were six metastases, three primary bone tumors, two herniated discs, and one each of a traumatic dislocation with syrinx formation and tuberculous spondylitis and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. If two parallel lines pass below the sternal notch, the manubriotomy should be inevitably performed. The mean preoperative Visual analogue scale score was 8 (range, 5-10), which improved to 4 (range, 0-6) postoperatively. Seven cases showed an increase in Frankel score postoperatively. CONCLUSION: The spatial relationship between the sternal notch and the two parallel lines to the lesion was rational to determine the feasibility of manubriotomy. The transmanubrial approach for CTJ lesions can achieve favorable clinical outcomes by providing direct decompression of lesion and effective reconstruction.


Subject(s)
Cervical Vertebrae , Decompression , Joint Dislocations , Female , Humans , Intervertebral Disc Displacement , Longitudinal Ligaments , Manubrium , Neoplasm Metastasis , Retrospective Studies , Spine , Spondylitis , Sternotomy , Sternum , Thoracic Surgery , Thoracic Vertebrae
12.
Korean Journal of Spine ; : 103-106, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-182512

ABSTRACT

Radiculopathy triggered by degenerative spinal disease is the most common cause of spinal surgery, and the number of affected elderly patients is increasing. Radiating pain that is extraspinal in origin may distract from the surgical decision on how to treat a neurological presentation in the lower extremities. A 54-year-old man with sciatica visited our outpatient clinic. He had undergone laminectomy and discectomy to treat spinal stenosis at another hospital, but his pain remained. Finally, he was diagnosed with a plexopathy caused by late recurrence of colorectal cancer, which compressed the lumbar plexus in the presacral area. This case report illustrates the potential for misdiagnosis of extraspinal plexopathy and the value of obtaining an accurate history. Although the symptoms are similar, spinal surgeons should consider both spinal and extraspinal origins of sciatica.


Subject(s)
Aged , Ambulatory Care Facilities , Colonic Neoplasms , Colorectal Neoplasms , Diagnostic Errors , Diskectomy , Humans , Laminectomy , Lower Extremity , Lumbosacral Plexus , Middle Aged , Radiculopathy , Recurrence , Sciatica , Spinal Diseases , Spinal Stenosis
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-76394

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To analyze the clinical data and surgical results from symptomatic chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) patients who underwent burr-hole drainage (BHD) at the maximal thickness area and twist-drill craniostomy (TDC) at the precoronal point. METHODS: We analyzed data from 65 symptomatic CSDH patients who underwent TDC at the pre-coronal point or BHD at the maximal thickness area. For TDC, we defined the pre-coronal point to be 1 cm anterior to the coronal suture at the level of the superior temporal line. TDC was performed in patients with CSDH that extended beyond the coronal suture, as confirmed by preoperative CT scans. Medical records, radiological findings, and clinical performance were reviewed and analyzed. RESULTS: Of the 65 CSDH patients, 13/17 (76.4%) with BHD and 42/48 (87.5%) with TDC showed improved clinical performance and radiological findings after surgery. Catheter failure was seen in 1/48 (2.4%) cases of TDC. Five patients (29.4%) in the BHD group and four patients (8.33%) in the TDC group underwent reoperations due to remaining hematomas, and they improved with a second operation, BHD or TDC. CONCLUSION: Both BHD at the maximal thickness area and TDC at the pre-coronal point are safe and effective drainage methods for symptomatic CSDHs with reasonable indications.


Subject(s)
Catheters , Drainage , Hematoma , Hematoma, Subdural, Chronic , Humans , Medical Records , Sutures , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-38184

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study describes a method for inducing spinal cord injuries in dogs by using balloon catheters via laminectomy and the subsequent changes in the electrophysiological response. METHODS: Female Beagle (Orient Bio, Seongnam, Korea) dogs weighing 10 kg at the time of injury were used. Under inhalation anesthesia, a posterior midline approach laminectomy was performed. A silicone balloon catheter (size 6 Fr; Sewoon Medical, Cheonan, Korea) was then inserted into the vertebral canal at the center of T10. The balloon was inflated to the maximum volume for 1, 2, or 3 days. Open field testing was performed for evaluating motor functions of the hindlimbs. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) induced by electrical and magnetic stimulation were recorded before and after spinal cord injury. RESULTS: Open field testing yielded locomotor scores of 0 or 1 for dogs subjected to compression for 3 days. These dogs showed no obvious improvement throughout the observation period, and the tonus of their hindlimbs was flaccid. In contrast, motor functions of dogs that had experienced compression for 1 or 2 days were variable, and all dogs showed spastic tonus in their hindlimbs. In dogs subjected to after compression for 3 days, electrically stimulated MEPs for the hindlimbs showed a significant amplitude reduction. Further, hindlimb movements were not evoked by magnetic stimulation of the cervical spine and vertex area. CONCLUSION: Compression for 3 days with a balloon catheter is a safe, reproducible, and reliable method for evaluating electrophysiological changes in a dog model of complete spinal cord injury.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia, Inhalation , Animals , Catheters , Dogs , Evoked Potentials, Motor , Female , Hindlimb , Humans , Laminectomy , Muscle Spasticity , Silicones , Spinal Cord Injuries , Spine
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-38179

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The intracranial pathologies after head trauma should be usually progressed. It is clearly visualized in the non-invasive brain CT. The invasive monitor such as intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring may be accompanied with the complications. This study aims whether the patients with severe head injury could be managed with serial CT scans. METHODS: The medical records of 113 patients with severe head injury in the prospectively enrolled trauma bank were retrospectively analyzed. After the emergency care, all the patients were admitted to the intensive care unit for the aggressive medical managements. Repeat brain CT scans were routinely taken at 6 hours and 48 hours after the trauma. ICP monitoring was restrictively applied for the uncertain intracranial pressure based on the CT. The surgical intervention and the mortality rate were analyzed. RESULTS: Immediate surgical intervention after the initial CT scan was done in 47 patients. Among the initially non-surgical patients, 59 patients were managed with the serial CT scans and 7 with the ICP monitoring. Surgical interventions underwent eventually for 10 patients in the initially non-surgical patients; 1 in the ICP monitoring and 9 in the serial CT. The mortality rate was 23.7% in the serial brain CT and 28.6% in the ICP monitoring. There was no statistical difference between two groups in the aspect of mortality (p=0.33). CONCLUSION: Serial CT scans in time could be a good way to monitor the intracranial progression in the severe head injury and reduce the implantation of an invasive ICP probe.


Subject(s)
Brain , Craniocerebral Trauma , Emergency Medical Services , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Intracranial Pressure , Medical Records , Mortality , Pathology , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
16.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-179141

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate changes in the posterior cranial fossa in patients with symptomatic Chiari malformation type I (CMI) compared to a control group. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed clinical and radiological data from 12 symptomatic patients with CMI and 24 healthy control subjects. The structures of the brain and skull base were investigated using magnetic resonance imaging. RESULTS: The length of the clivus had significantly decreased in the CMI group than in the control group (p=0.000). The angle between the clivus and the McRae line (p<0.024), as the angle between the supraocciput and the McRae line (p<0.021), and the angle between the tentorium and a line connecting the internal occipital protuberance to the opisthion (p<0.009) were significantly larger in the CMI group than in the control group. The mean vertical length of the cerebellar hemisphere (p<0.003) and the mean length of the coronal and sagittal superoinferior aspects of the cerebellum (p<0.05) were longer in the CMI group than in the control group, while the mean length of the axial anteroposterior aspect of the cerebellum (p<0.001) was significantly shorter in the CMI group relative to control subjects. CONCLUSION: We elucidate the transformation of the posterior cranial fossa into the narrow funnel shape. The sufficient cephalocaudal extension of the craniectomy of the posterior cranial fossa has more decompression effect than other type extension of the craniectomy in CMI patients.


Subject(s)
Arnold-Chiari Malformation , Brain , Cerebellum , Congenital Abnormalities , Cranial Fossa, Posterior , Decompression , Decompressive Craniectomy , Embryology , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Retrospective Studies , Skull Base
17.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-25059

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Recent studies have shown encouraging progress toward the use of autogenic and allogenic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to arrest, or even lead to partial regeneration in, intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. However, this technology is still in its infancy, and further development is required. The aim of this study was to analyze whether rat adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSC) can differentiate towards IVD-like cells after treatment with transforming growth factor beta3 (TGF-beta3) in vitro. We also performed quantitative analysis of gene expression for ADMSC only, ADMSCs treated with TGF-beta3, and co-cultured ADMSCs treated with TGF-beta3. METHODS: ADMSCs were sub-cultured to homogeneity and used in fluorocytometry assays for CD11, CD45, and CD90/Thy1. ADMSCs were differentiated in spheroid culture towards the chondrogenic lineage by the presence of TGF-beta3, dexamethasone, and ascorbate. We also co-cultured pure ADMSCs and nucleus pulposus cells in 24-well plates, and performed immunohistochemical staining, western blotting, and RT-PCR for quantitativeanalysis of gene expression. RESULTS: Results of fluorocytometry were positive for CD90/Thy1 and negative for CD11 and CD45. TGF-beta3-mediated induction of ADMSCs led to the expression of the differentiation markers of intervertebral disc-like cells, such as aggrecan, collagen II, and sox-9. Co-cultured ADMSCs treated with TGF-beta3 showed higher expression of differentiation markers and greater extracellular matrix production compared with ADMSCs treated with TGF-beta3 alone. CONCLUSION: ADMSC treated with TGF-beta3 may be an attractive source for regeneration therapy in degenerative IVD. These findings may also help elucidate the pathologic mechanism of MSC therapy in the degeneration of IVD in vivo.


Subject(s)
Adipose Tissue , Aggrecans , Animals , Antigens, Differentiation , Blotting, Western , Collagen , Dexamethasone , Extracellular Matrix , Gene Expression , Intervertebral Disc , Intervertebral Disc Degeneration , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , Rats , Regeneration , Transforming Growth Factor beta3
18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-211791

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is usually carried out under three-dimensional (2D) fluoroscopic guidance. However, operative complications or bone cement distribution might be difficult to assess on the basis of only 2D radiographic projection images. We evaluated the feasibility of performing an intraoperative and postoperative examination in patients undergoing PVP by using three-dimensional (3D) reconstructive C-arm. METHODS: Standard PVP procedures were performed on 14 consecutive patients by using a Siremobil Iso-C3D and a multidetector computed tomography machine. Post-processing of acquired volumetric datasets included multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) and surface shaded display (SSD). We analyzed intraoperative and immediate postoperative evaluation of the needle trajectory and bone cement distribution. RESULTS: The male : female ratio was 2 : 12; mean age of patients, 70 (range, 77-54) years; and mean T score, -3.4. The mean operation time was 52.14 min, but the time required to perform and post-process the rotational acquisitions was 7.76 min. The detection of bone cement distribution and leakage after PVP by using MPR and SSD was possible in all patients. However, detection of the safe trajectory for needle insertion was not possible. CONCLUSION: 3D rotational image acquisition can enable intra- or post-procedural assessment of vertebroplasty procedures for the detection of bone cement distribution and leakage. However, it is difficult to assess the safe trajectory for needle insertion.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Male , Multidetector Computed Tomography , Needles , Silver Sulfadiazine , Vertebroplasty
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-96392

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a minimally invasive procedure to relieve or decrease pain in patients with osteoporotic compression fractures. However, vertebroplasty in the osteoporotic burst fracture patients with preoperative canal encroachment are still being debated, because it can aggravate spinal canal encroachment. The objects of this study is evaluation of the changes in spinal canal narrowing after percutaneous vertebroplasty. METHODS: Inclusion criteria was osteoporotic bursting fracture patients with 5 to 20% canal encroachment (less than 5 mm). Exclusion criteria included pathological fractures, unstable vertebral fractures involving the posterior column, and severe neurological deficit. We measured the changes in spinal canal narrowing by pre- and postoperative computed tomography. Degree of canal encroachment was measured as the distance between the imaginary line along the posterior margin of the bony fragment and the maximal anterior imaginary line of the spinal canal in the axial CT scan. RESULTS: This study was based on 10 patients (1 male and 9 female; age range, 52-89 years; mean age, 75 years). The mean decrease in the compression rate of the vertebral body height was 14.4% (43.4% to 29%). The mean decrease in the kyphotic angle was 4.3degrees (11.7degrees to 7.4degrees). The mean preoperative canal encroachment were 3.5 mm and postoperative canal encroachment was 3.7 mm, respectively. The mean preoperative VAS score was 4.3 and postoperative VAS score was 1.4. CONCLUSION: Vertebroplasty can be a safe treatment option for osteoporotic burst fractures with preoperative minimal canal encroachment.


Subject(s)
Body Height , Fractures, Compression , Fractures, Spontaneous , Humans , Kyphosis , Male , Osteoporotic Fractures , Spinal Canal , Spinal Injuries , Vertebroplasty
20.
Korean Journal of Spine ; : 334-339, 2012.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-69197

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We investigated the association between clinical and radiological results and assessed the radiological changes according to the distribution pattern and amount of injected cement after vertebroplasty. METHODS: Two hundred and one patients underwent vertebroplasty; of these, 15 were follow up for more than 2 years. For radiological analysis, we grouped the patients according to cement distribution as follows: group 1, unilateral, unilateral distribution of cement; group 2, bilateral-uneven, bilateral distribution of cement but separated mass; and group 3, bilateral-even, bilateral single mass of cement. To compare radiologic with clinical results, we assessed the visual analogue scale (VAS) score, amount of injected cement, bone mineral density (BMD), postoperative and follow-up vertebral body compression ratios, and postoperative and follow-up kyphotic angles. RESULTS: There were 4 (26.7%) patients in group 1, 6 (40.0%) in group 2, and 5 (33.3%) in group 3. The mean VAS score was 5.2 preoperatively, 1.8 postoperatively, and 3.2 at 2-year follow-up. The 2-year follow-up compression ratio was better in patients with even distribution of injected cement (group 2 and 3) than group 1. However, it was not statistically insignificant (p>0.05). The follow-up kyphotic angle was more aggravated in the group 1 than in the other groups (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: Our study showed that vertebroplasty had a beneficial effect on pain relief, particularly in the immediate postoperative stage. The augmented spine tended to be more stable in the cases with increased amount and more even distribution of injected cement.


Subject(s)
Bone Density , Follow-Up Studies , Fractures, Compression , Humans , Osteoporotic Fractures , Spine , Vertebroplasty
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