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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-927019

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#The study investigated the incidence of thromboembolic events (TEE) in head and neck (H&N) cancer patients who received concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) with cisplatin, and analyzed the factors affecting TEE occurrence @*Methods@#Two hundred and fifty-seven patients who started CCRT with cisplatin for H&N cancer from January 2005 to December 2019 were analyzed. @*Results@#TEE occurred in five patients, an incidence rate of 1.9%. The 2-, 4-, and 6-month cumulative incidences of TEE were 0.8%, 1.6%, and 1.9%, respectively. Khorana score was the only factor associated with TEE occurrence (p = 0.010). @*Conclusions@#The incidence of TEE in H&N cancer patients who underwent CCRT with cisplatin was relatively low when compared to other types of cancer. However, patients with a high Khorana score require more careful surveillance for possible TEE occurrence.

2.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-917696

ABSTRACT

Background/Objectives@#Extra-nodal extension (ENE) is one of the strongest prognosticators in oral cancers. Here we tried to evaluate clinicopathological factors associated with the presence of ENE.Materials & Methods: We retrospectively analyzed clinical information of 120 patients who diagnosed with oral cancer and received curative surgery at our hospital from Mar 2012 to Apr 2020. We comparatively analyzed clinicopathological factors associated with the presence of lymph node (LN) metastasis and ENE, respectively. @*Results@#Variable factors of primary tumor characteristics such as lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, largest diameter of tumor, depth of invasion and maximum standardized uptake value were significantly associated with the presence of cervical LN metastasis. The largest diameter of tumor was statistically significant also in multivariate analysis for predicting the LN metastasis. Meanwhile, the association between primary tumor characteristics and the presence of ENE were not statistically significant except the primary tumor size. Importantly, factors associated with LN characteristics including the maximum diameter and number of metastatic LNs were significantly associated with ENE. @*Conclusion@#In this study, several factors affecting cervical LN metastasis and ENE in oral cancer patients were identified. The ENE seems to be influenced by the status of the metastatic LNs, such as the number of metastatic LNs, rather than the characteristics of the primary tumor itself.

3.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-902111

ABSTRACT

Extranodal Natural Killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, is a subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, strongly associated with Epstein-Barr virus. Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma mostly affects the nasal cavity and there has been no report of the disease’s occurrence at the base of tongue. Here we report a case of 43-year-old man who presented with a diffuse ulcerative lesion at the base of tongue. Because the patient had oral bleeding, tracheostomy and lingual artery ligation was performed via a transcervical approach to control bleeding and protect the upper airway. We performed a deep biopsy through the lateral pharyngotomy approach, and finally, the patient was diagnosed with extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type. We report this rare case of extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma at the base of tongue with a literature review.

4.
Article in 0 | WPRIM | ID: wpr-902099

ABSTRACT

Secretory carcinoma of salivary gland origin is a recently described tumor that harbors a characteristic ETV6-NTRK3 translocation that is identical to secretory carcinoma of the breast. The majority of tumors were located in the parotid gland and other major salivary glands, while the minority occurred in a minor salivary gland. We present a case of a 71-year-old female who was diagnosed with low-grade salivary gland cancer presenting in the soft palate accompanying lymph node metastasis. Peroral wide excision, selective neck dissection, reconstruction with radial forearm free flap was performed. The final pathology report indicated secretory carcinoma of the soft palate. The patient was followed-up without evidence of recurrence for one year. At present, it is difficult to accurately assess prognosis and treatment for the secretory carcinoma of the minor salivary gland origin. Continuous follow-up with various cases is needed further.

5.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-894407

ABSTRACT

Extranodal Natural Killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, is a subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, strongly associated with Epstein-Barr virus. Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma mostly affects the nasal cavity and there has been no report of the disease’s occurrence at the base of tongue. Here we report a case of 43-year-old man who presented with a diffuse ulcerative lesion at the base of tongue. Because the patient had oral bleeding, tracheostomy and lingual artery ligation was performed via a transcervical approach to control bleeding and protect the upper airway. We performed a deep biopsy through the lateral pharyngotomy approach, and finally, the patient was diagnosed with extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type. We report this rare case of extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma at the base of tongue with a literature review.

6.
Article in 0 | WPRIM | ID: wpr-894395

ABSTRACT

Secretory carcinoma of salivary gland origin is a recently described tumor that harbors a characteristic ETV6-NTRK3 translocation that is identical to secretory carcinoma of the breast. The majority of tumors were located in the parotid gland and other major salivary glands, while the minority occurred in a minor salivary gland. We present a case of a 71-year-old female who was diagnosed with low-grade salivary gland cancer presenting in the soft palate accompanying lymph node metastasis. Peroral wide excision, selective neck dissection, reconstruction with radial forearm free flap was performed. The final pathology report indicated secretory carcinoma of the soft palate. The patient was followed-up without evidence of recurrence for one year. At present, it is difficult to accurately assess prognosis and treatment for the secretory carcinoma of the minor salivary gland origin. Continuous follow-up with various cases is needed further.

7.
Cancer Research and Treatment ; : 1019-1030, 2020.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-831137

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Radiation-induced oral mucositis limits delivery of high-dose radiation to targeted cancers. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a treatment strategy to alleviate radiation-induced oral mucositis during radiation therapy. We previously reported that inhibiting reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation suppresses autophagy. Irradiation induces autophagy, suggesting that antioxidant treatment may be used to inhibit radiation-induced oral mucositis. @*Materials and Methods@#We determined whether treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) could attenuate radiation-induced buccal mucosa damage in vitro and in vivo. The protective effects of NAC against oral mucositis were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry. mRNA and protein levels of DNA damage and autophagy-related genes were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. @*Results@#Rats manifesting radiation-induced oral mucositis showed decreased oral intake, loss of body weight, and low survival rate. NAC intake slightly increased oral intake, body weight, and the survival rate without statistical significance. However, histopathologic characteristics were markedly restored in NAC-treated irradiated rats. LC3B staining of rat buccal mucosa revealed that NAC treatment significantly decreased the number of radiation-induced autophagic cells. Further, NAC inhibited radiation-induced ROS generation and autophagy signaling. In vitro, NAC treatment significantly reduced the expression of NRF2, LC3B, p62, and Beclin-1 in keratinocytes compared with that after radiation treatment. @*Conclusion@#NAC treatment significantly inhibited radiation-induced autophagy in keratinocytes and rat buccal mucosa and may be a potentially safe and effective option for the prevention of radiation-induced buccal mucosa damage.

8.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-916558

ABSTRACT

Acute supraglottitis is characterized by an inflammation and edema of the supraglottic region and a potential life-threatening condition because of its risk for sudden upper airway compromise. Prompt diagnosis, administration of broad spectrum antibiotics, and airway management is pivotal for reducing serious complications. In the immunocompromised host, microorganisms are more likely to elicit mucosal inflammations, thus clinicians should pay attention to those patients for prompt removal of the causes of immune disruption. Here we report a case of acute adult supraglottitis with neutropenia caused by anti-thyroid drug with a review of the related literatures.

9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762712

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: An enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocol incorporates up-to-date perioperative care principles; the primary aim in using an ERAS protocol is to reduce issues that delay the recovery and cause the complications. The aim of this study was to compare outcomes associated with head and neck cancer surgery with free-flap reconstruction before and after implementation of an ERAS protocol. METHODS: Outcomes were analyzed by dividing patients into 2 groups: 29 patients in the non-ERAS group and 60 patients in the ERAS group. The ERAS group performed a prospective observational cohort study of patients who underwent a head and neck cancer surgery with free-flap reconstruction in Ajou University Hospital from August 2015 to December 2017. The non-ERAS group retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who had undergone the same surgery from August 2012 to July 2015. RESULTS: Demographics, comorbidities, hospital length of stay (LOS), postoperative complications, starting time of rehabilitation, and postoperative periods before radiotherapy for the non-ERAS and ERAS groups were compared. Hospital LOS was significantly lower for patients whose care followed the ERAS protocol than for patients in the non-ERAS group (30.87 ± 20.72 days vs. 59.66 ± 40.43 days, P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: In this study, hospital LOS was reduced through fast recovery after the implementation of the ERAS protocol. Therefore, the ERAS protocol appeared feasible and safe in head and neck cancer surgery with free-flap reconstruction.


Subject(s)
Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Demography , Free Tissue Flaps , Head and Neck Neoplasms , Head , Humans , Length of Stay , Medical Records , Perioperative Care , Postoperative Care , Postoperative Complications , Postoperative Period , Prospective Studies , Radiotherapy , Radiotherapy, Adjuvant , Rehabilitation , Retrospective Studies
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-763307

ABSTRACT

Korean Society of Thyroid-Head and Neck Surgery appointed a Task Force to provide guidance on the implementation of a surgical treatment of oral cancer. MEDLINE databases were searched for articles on subjects related to “surgical management of oral cancer” published in English. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. The quality of evidence was rated with use RoBANS (Risk of Bias Assessment Tool for Nonrandomized Studies) and AMSTAR (A Measurement Tool to Assess the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews). Evidence-based recommendations for practice were ranked according to the American College of Physicians grading system. Additional directives are provided as expert opinions and Delphi questionnaire when insufficient evidence existed. The Committee developed 68 evidence-based recommendations in 34 categories intended to assist clinicians and patients and counselors, and health policy-makers. Proper surgical treatment selection for oral cancer, which is directed by patient- and subsite-specific factors, remains the greatest predictor of successful treatment outcomes. These guidelines are intended for use in conjunction with the individual patient's treatment goals.


Subject(s)
Advisory Committees , Bias , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell , Counseling , Expert Testimony , Humans , Mouth Neoplasms , Neck , Republic of Korea
11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-786671

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Macrophages have been known to have diverse roles either after tissue damage or during the wound healing process; however, their roles in flap wound healing are poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to evaluate how macrophages contribute to the flap wound regeneration.METHODS: A murine model of a pedicled flap was generated, and the time-course of the wound healing process was determined. Especially, the interface between the flap and the residual tissue was histopathologically evaluated. Using clodronate liposome, a macrophage-depleting agent, the functional role of macrophages in flap wound healing was investigated. Coculture of human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT and monocytic cell line THP-1 was performed to unveil relationship between the two cell types.RESULTS: Macrophage depletion significantly impaired flap wound healing process showing increased necrotic area after clodronate liposome administration. Interestingly, microscopic evaluation revealed that epithelial remodeling between the flap tissue and residual normal tissue did not occurred under the lack of macrophage infiltration. Coculture and scratch wound healing assays indicated that macrophages significantly affected the migration of keratinocytes.CONCLUSION: Macrophages play a critical role in the flap wound regeneration. Especially, epithelial remodeling at the flap margin is dependent on proper macrophage infiltration. These results implicate to support the cellular mechanisms of impaired flap wound healing.


Subject(s)
Cell Line , Clodronic Acid , Coculture Techniques , Humans , Keratinocytes , Liposomes , Macrophages , Regeneration , Surgical Flaps , Wound Healing , Wounds and Injuries
12.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 746-753, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-716429

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The present study investigated the dynamics and prognostic role of messenger RNA (mRNA) expression responsible for 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in FDG positron emission tomography (PET) and radioactive iodine (131I) uptake in whole-body radioactive iodine scans (WBS) in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The primary and processed data were downloaded from the Genomic Data Commons Data Portal. Expression data for sodium/iodide symporter (solute carrier family 5 member 5, SLC5A5), hexokinase (HK1–3), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), and glucose transporter (solute carrier family 2, SLC2A1–4) mRNA were collected. RESULTS: Expression of SLC5A5 mRNA were negatively correlated with SLC2A1 mRNA and positively correlated with SLC2A4 mRNA. In PTC with BRAF mutations, expressions of SLC2A1, SLC2A3, HK2, and HK3 mRNA were higher than those in PTC without BRAF mutations. Expression of SLC5A5, SLC2A4, HK1, and G6PD mRNA was lower in PTC without BRAF mutation. PTCs with higher expression of SLC5A5 mRNA had more favorable disease-free survival, but no association with overall survival. CONCLUSION: Expression of SLC5A5 mRNA was negatively correlated with SLC2A1 mRNA. This finding provides a molecular basis for the management of PTC with negative WBS using 18F-FDG PET scans. In addition, higher expression of SLC5A5 mRNA was associated with less PTC recurrence, but not with deaths.


Subject(s)
Disease-Free Survival , Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 , Genome , Glucose Transport Proteins, Facilitative , Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase , Hexokinase , Humans , Iodine , Ion Transport , Positron-Emission Tomography , Recurrence , RNA, Messenger , Thyroid Gland , Thyroid Neoplasms
13.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-13304

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: High-speed videolaryngoscopy (HSV) is the only technique that captures the true intra-cycle vibratory behavior of the vocal folds by capturing full images of the vocal folds. However, it has problems of no immediate feedback during examination, considerable waiting time for digital kymography (DKG), recording duration limited to a few seconds, and extreme demands for storage space. Herein, we demonstrate a new post-processing method that converts HSV images to two-dimensional digital kymography (2D-DKG) images, which adopts the algorithm of 2D videokymography (2D VKG). MATERIALS AND METHODS: HSV system was used to capture images of vocal folds. HSV images were post-processed in Kay image-process software (KIPS), and conventional DKG images were retrieved. Custom-made post-processing system was used to convert HSV images to 2D-DKG images. The quantitative parameters of the post-processed 2D-DKG images was validated by comparing these parameters with those of the DKG images. RESULTS: Serial HSV images for all phases of vocal fold vibratory movement are included. The images were converted by the scanning method using U-medical image-process software. Similar to conventional DKG, post-processed 2D DKG image from the HSV image can provide quantitative information on vocal fold mucosa vibration, including the various vibratory phases. Differences in amplitude symmetry index, phase symmetry index, open quotient, and close quotient between 2D-DKG and DKG were analyzed. There were no statistical differences between the quantitative parameters of vocal fold vibratory movement in 2D-DKG and DKG. CONCLUSION: The post-processing method of converting HSV images to 2D DKG images could provide clinical information and storage economy.


Subject(s)
Kymography , Methods , Mucous Membrane , Vibration , Vocal Cords , Voice
14.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-654497

ABSTRACT

Lymph node metastasis (LNM) is an important prognostic factor in head and neck cancer (HNC), which leads to recurrence and poor outcome. Despite the advances in multimodality treatment protocols, overall survival in patients with LNM remains limited, thus calling for the need of a more thorough understanding of the biology in metastatic process. In the past, LNM had been suspected to rely mostly on passive mechanistic impulse from primary tumor. However, recent discovery of new lymphatic markers, regulating growth factors, and cognate receptors, has elucidated the active biological regulation during metastatic cascades, which primarily involves primary tumor lymphangiogenesis, pre-metastatic niche formation, and sentinel LNM. In this review, we discuss recent literatures on the mechanisms of LNM in HNC that is expected to allow a better understanding of the disease as well as suggesting a potential clinical implication.


Subject(s)
Biology , Clinical Protocols , Head and Neck Neoplasms , Head , Humans , Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins , Lymph Nodes , Lymphangiogenesis , Lymphatic Metastasis , Neoplasm Metastasis , Recurrence
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-169452

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Lymph node metastasis (LNM) is a strong prognostic factor in many solid cancers, including head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), and LNM can be dependent upon primary tumor biology, as well as tumor dimension. Here, we investigate the relative risk of LNM in accordance to tumor dimension and biology in HNSCC subsites. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Medical data of 295 HNSCC patients who had undergone the initial curative surgery (oral tongue 174, oropharynx 75, hypopharynx 46) were analyzed to identify the significant predictive factor for LNM. Tumor volume and thickness were set as tumor dimensional variables, and biological variables included lymphovascular, perineural invasion, and tumor differentiation. Statistical analyses were conducted to assess the predictability of LNM from variables, and subgroup analyses according to the tumor subsites. In addition, we evaluated the impacts of tumor dimension and biological variables on the treatment outcomes and survival in HNSCC subsites. RESULTS: The overall tumor dimension and biological variables had a similar impact on the prediction of LNM in HNSCC (area under the curve, 0.7682 and 0.7717). The prediction sensitivity of LNM in oral tongue cancer was mainly dependent on tumor dimension, while LNM in oroand hypo-pharynx cancers was more influenced by biological factors. Survival analyses also confirmed that biological factor was more powerful in estimating disease-free survival of hypopharyngeal cancer patients, while tumor dimension was more significant in that of oral cancer patients. CONCLUSION: Tumor dimension and biology have a significant, tumor subsite-dependent impact on the occurrence of LNM and disease-free survival in HNSCC.


Subject(s)
Biological Factors , Biology , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell , Disease-Free Survival , Head and Neck Neoplasms , Head , Humans , Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms , Hypopharynx , Lymph Nodes , Lymphatic Metastasis , Mouth Neoplasms , Neck , Neoplasm Metastasis , Oropharynx , Tongue , Tongue Neoplasms , Tumor Burden
16.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-30185

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To clarify the anatomical distribution of the lingual artery in normal adult subjects through histopathologic evaluations. METHODS: Eighteen healthy cadaveric tongues were used to produce 8 paraffin-embedded tissue sections each. Length from midline raphe, depth from dorsum of tongue and the whole transverse length tongue were measured. The lateral distance, depth, and proportion of lateral distance of deep lingual artery were determined from tip to base of tongue gradually. Lateral distance is length from median raphe to the center of deep lingual artery lumen. Depth is vertical distance from dorsal surface of tongue to the center of deep lingual artery. Proportion of lateral distance is obtained by dividing lateral distance with transverse length from median raphe to lateral border of tongue. The degree of symmetry between right and left sides and the difference between selected spots were evaluated. RESULTS: Right and left sides of the lingual artery were symmetric. The lingual artery was lateralized as it run posterior. The lingual artery runs gradually deeper from the surface as it goes near the base of tongue. Both length and depth of the lingual artery gradually increased between 0%–75% of the mobile tongue, but 75%–100% zone of the lingual artery showed no significant difference. There was no anastomosis between right and left side of the lingual arteries. The lingual artery was located within 50% of the transverse length of tongue from median raphe. CONCLUSION: The present study reveals 3-dimensional information on the anatomical distributions of the lingual artery in normal adult subjects. These findings gives us beneficial information about the handling of the lingual artery during oral and base of tongue-related surgery.


Subject(s)
Adult , Arteries , Cadaver , Humans , Surgery, Oral , Tongue
17.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-66370

ABSTRACT

Total laryngectomy remains as an important treatment option in selected patients with laryngopharyngeal cancers, which inevitably sacrifices naturally produced voice. Much effort has been devoted to voice restoration for these laryngectomized patients. Several ways of voice rehabilitation after total laryngectomy have been developed and utilized thus far, including tracheoesophageal shunt speech, esophageal speech, pneumatic speech aid, and electrolarynx. Of these, tracheoesophageal shunt speech appears to be the most effective voice restoration method, while other trials might also be useful in special situations. Nevertheless, each method has its own unique mechanisms of voice production, thus has its advantages and drawbacks in clinical setting. In this review, we discuss the currently available management options for the rehabilitation of laryngectomized voice.


Subject(s)
Humans , Laryngectomy , Methods , Rehabilitation , Speech, Esophageal , Voice
18.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-66367

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Microsurgical resection of intracordal cysts is technically difficult and challenging because the wall of cysts may be tightly attached to underlying vocal ligament and/or overlying epithelium, and therefore their thin wall will easily rupture during surgical dissection. We aimed to evaluate the voice outcomes of standard microflap subepithelial resection and the recurrence rate depending on the intraoperative rupturing of the cyst. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Medical records of Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea, were reviewed for sixty-four consecutive patients who received surgical resection of vocal cyst using microflap subepithelial dissection technique between the year 2004 and 2013. Meticulous dissection was performed to completely remove the cyst wall while preserving the mucosa and the lamina propria as much as possible. Voice outcomes and recurrence rates were compared according to the type, size and the intraoperative rupture of cyst. RESULTS: Presence or absence of cyst rupture was clearly described in the operation records of 41 patients. Intraoperative rupture of the cyst occurred in 32 of 41 (78%) patients. The recurrence was detected in 5 of 64 (7.8%) total cases and 4 of 32 (12.5%) cases of ruptured cyst, but not in 9 cases of intact extirpation. Rupture was more common in case of mucous retention cyst compared with epidermoid cyst (p=0.036). Subjective and objective voice parameters were measured at before and 3 months after surgery, which improved regardless of the cyst rupture. CONCLUSION: Although complete microsurgical extirpation of intracordal cyst while keeping the cyst wall intact is technically difficult, meticulous dissection with maximal preservation of surrounding tissue may warrant the improvement of voice outcomes.


Subject(s)
Epidermal Cyst , Epithelium , Humans , Korea , Medical Records , Mucous Membrane , Recurrence , Rupture , Seoul , Vocal Cords , Voice
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-87796

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Head and neck reconstruction is still challenging in terms of esthetic and functional outcomes. This study investigated the feasibility of the angular branch-based scapular tip free flap (STFF). METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 17 patients undergoing maxillectomy and mandibulectomy and either primary or secondary reconstruction by STFF. This study included surgical, esthetic, and functional outcomes, and detailed data are presented regarding the flap, such as pedicle length, size of the harvested bone, and failure rate. Medical photographs were used to estimate the esthetic outcome, and computed tomography was used to check the flap status postoperatively. RESULTS: The data were collected from April 2013 to April 2014. Eight patients underwent maxillary reconstruction, and nine underwent mandibular reconstruction. Maxillary defects usually included unilateral alveolar structures and the palate; mandibular defects were usually those involving mandibular angle and short segment. Vein grafting was not required in any of the patients. Flap failure occurred in one of the 17 patients (5.9%) with successful reconstruction after revision. Of the eight maxillectomy patients, orbital revisions for diplopia after maxillary reconstruction were performed in two patients (25%), and oroantral fistula repair was performed in one patient (12.5%). CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated the reconstructive advantages of the angular branch-based STFF, long pedicle, low flap failure, 3-dimensional nature of bone and soft tissues (chimeric flap), and small rate of donor site morbidity with free ambulation. This flap is an excellent option for use in complex three-dimensional head and neck reconstruction.


Subject(s)
Diplopia , Free Tissue Flaps , Head and Neck Neoplasms , Head , Humans , Mandibular Reconstruction , Neck , Orbit , Oroantral Fistula , Palate , Retrospective Studies , Scapula , Tissue Donors , Transplants , Veins , Walking
20.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-653668

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In head and neck reconstructive surgery, the stability of vital signs is important for patient recovery and flap outcome. We aimed to determine the better sedation protocol by comparing two protocols, namaely, midazolam/morphine (MM)-based and remifentanil (RF)-based sedation protocols, in the immediate postoperative settings of head and neck reconstructive surgery. SUBJECTS AND METHOD: We retrospectively reviewed the medical data of patients who underwent reconstructive surgery after the ablation of head and neck cancer involving MM sedation (n=34) or RF sedation (n=28). Parameters related to vital signs, flap outcomes, occurrence of delirium, length of stay and nursing burden were compared between the groups. RESULTS: The length of stay at the intensive care unit and flap outcomes were similar in the two groups. However, blood pressure as measured by frequency of variation was more stable in the RF group than in the MM group. In addition, the number of medical calls from the attending nurse due to the fluctuation of vital signs was less in the RF group than in the MM group. CONCLUSION: RF-based sedation for the postoperative intensive care unit care after head and neck reconstructive surgery is more effective in cases where vital signs are less stable. This type of sedation may decrease the nursing burden for these patients.


Subject(s)
Blood Pressure , Delirium , Free Tissue Flaps , Head and Neck Neoplasms , Head , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Critical Care , Length of Stay , Neck , Nursing , Postoperative Care , Retrospective Studies , Vital Signs
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