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1.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 136-140, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-914035

ABSTRACT

Eradication of Helicobacter pylori is the first-line treatment for gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas; however, lesions may persist in 20% of patients after initial treatment, thereby necessitating the use of an additional therapeutic approach. Other treatment options include radiation therapy, chemotherapy, endoscopic resection, rituximab therapy, or watchful waiting. We present a case of localized gastric MALT lymphoma that did not respond to H. pylori eradication therapy. The patient waited for 12 months but the tumor showed no signs of regression endoscopically. Histologic examination revealed residual MALT lymphoma. The tumor was then successfully treated using endoscopic submucosal dissection and the patient remained disease-free for 4 years. To our knowledge, this is the first case in which a gastric MALT lymphoma was treated with endoscopic submucosal dissection. In conclusion, endoscopic resection may be recommended as second-line therapy for properly selected patients with gastric MALT lymphoma as it is effective and minimally invasive.

2.
Gut and Liver ; : 723-731, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-898474

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#This study examined the long-term outcomes of undifferentiated-type early gastric cancer (UD EGC) with positive horizontal margins (HMs) after endoscopic resection (ER) and compared them between additional surgery and nonsurgical management. @*Methods@#From 2005 to 2015, a total of 1,124 patients with UD EGC underwent ER at 18 tertiary hospitals in Korea. Of them, 92 patients with positive HMs as the only noncurative factor (n=25) or with both positive HMs and tumor size >2 cm (n=67) were included. These patients underwent additional surgery (n=40), underwent additional endoscopic treatment (n=6), or were followed up without further treatment (n=46). @*Results@#No lymph node (LN) metastasis was found in patients who underwent additional surgery. During a median follow-up of 57.7 months (interquartile range, 27.6 to 68.8 months), no LN or distant metastases or gastric cancer-related deaths occurred in the overall cohort. At baseline, the residual cancer rate was 57.8% (26/45) after additional surgery or ER. The 5-year local recurrence rate was 33.6% among patients who were followed up without additional treatment. The 5-year overall survival rates were 95.0% and 87.8% after additional surgery and nonsurgical management (endoscopic treatment or close follow-up), respectively (log-rank p=0.224). In the multivariate Cox regression analysis, nonsurgical management was not associated with an increased risk of mortality. @*Conclusions@#UD EGC with positive HMs after ER may have favorable long-term outcomes and a very low risk of LN metastasis. Nonsurgical management may be suggested as an alternative, particularly for patients with old age or chronic illness.

3.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 759-762, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-897817

ABSTRACT

Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas are typically found in the stomach, while colonic MALT lymphoma is rarely found. Considering its rarity, definitive treatment of colonic MALT lymphoma has not been established. Different from that in the stomach, Helicobacter pylori infection might play a minor role while determining the treatment of colonic MALT lymphoma. If colonic MALT lymphoma is localized, treatment options are surgical resection, radiation, endoscopic resection, or combination therapy. Here, we report a case of residual colonic MALT lymphoma after endoscopic mucosal resection, which was a 1.5-cm-sized tumor confined to the superficial wall of the rectum. The lesion was successfully treated using the endoscopic submucosal dissection technique. The patient remained disease-free for 4 years. This case provides rationale for endoscopic submucosal dissection treatment as a salvage therapy for residual tumors in properly selected patients with colonic MALT lymphoma.

4.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 920-923, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-914005

ABSTRACT

Transcatheter arterial embolization is a safe and effective treatment for visceral artery aneurysms; nevertheless, some complications can occur. Coil migration to other organs after embolization is extremely rare, and only 16 cases have been reported previously. We report a rare case of coil migration to the duodenal lumen after embolization of a right colic artery pseudoaneurysm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of coil migration after a right colic artery embolization. The patient exhibited no symptoms and was treated conservatively without any intervention. Some previous reports have demonstrated spontaneous coil passage and successful conservative management. Our case supports conservative treatment as the primary treatment for asymptomatic patients. Clinicians should assess the risks and benefits of coil removal in asymptomatic patients before performing any intervention.

5.
Gut and Liver ; : 723-731, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-890770

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#This study examined the long-term outcomes of undifferentiated-type early gastric cancer (UD EGC) with positive horizontal margins (HMs) after endoscopic resection (ER) and compared them between additional surgery and nonsurgical management. @*Methods@#From 2005 to 2015, a total of 1,124 patients with UD EGC underwent ER at 18 tertiary hospitals in Korea. Of them, 92 patients with positive HMs as the only noncurative factor (n=25) or with both positive HMs and tumor size >2 cm (n=67) were included. These patients underwent additional surgery (n=40), underwent additional endoscopic treatment (n=6), or were followed up without further treatment (n=46). @*Results@#No lymph node (LN) metastasis was found in patients who underwent additional surgery. During a median follow-up of 57.7 months (interquartile range, 27.6 to 68.8 months), no LN or distant metastases or gastric cancer-related deaths occurred in the overall cohort. At baseline, the residual cancer rate was 57.8% (26/45) after additional surgery or ER. The 5-year local recurrence rate was 33.6% among patients who were followed up without additional treatment. The 5-year overall survival rates were 95.0% and 87.8% after additional surgery and nonsurgical management (endoscopic treatment or close follow-up), respectively (log-rank p=0.224). In the multivariate Cox regression analysis, nonsurgical management was not associated with an increased risk of mortality. @*Conclusions@#UD EGC with positive HMs after ER may have favorable long-term outcomes and a very low risk of LN metastasis. Nonsurgical management may be suggested as an alternative, particularly for patients with old age or chronic illness.

6.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 759-762, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-890113

ABSTRACT

Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas are typically found in the stomach, while colonic MALT lymphoma is rarely found. Considering its rarity, definitive treatment of colonic MALT lymphoma has not been established. Different from that in the stomach, Helicobacter pylori infection might play a minor role while determining the treatment of colonic MALT lymphoma. If colonic MALT lymphoma is localized, treatment options are surgical resection, radiation, endoscopic resection, or combination therapy. Here, we report a case of residual colonic MALT lymphoma after endoscopic mucosal resection, which was a 1.5-cm-sized tumor confined to the superficial wall of the rectum. The lesion was successfully treated using the endoscopic submucosal dissection technique. The patient remained disease-free for 4 years. This case provides rationale for endoscopic submucosal dissection treatment as a salvage therapy for residual tumors in properly selected patients with colonic MALT lymphoma.

8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-107255

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Elevated carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 level may be unable to differentiate between benign and malignant pancreatobiliary disease with obstructive jaundice. The study aims to determine the clinical interpretation and the diagnostic value of CA 19-9 level in pancreatobiliary diseases with coexistent obstructive jaundice. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the data of 981 patients who underwent biliary drainage due to obstructive jaundice following pancreatobiliary disease at Sanggye Paik Hospital for 5 years. 114 patients with serial follow-up data for CA 19-9 level were included in this study (80 patients with malignancy and 34 patients with benign diseases). We compared the levels of CA 19-9 levels and the biochemical value before and after biliary drainage. RESULTS: The rate of CA 19-9 elevation (>37 U/mL) was significantly different between the benign group and the malignant group (59% vs. 90%, p=0.001). Despite the decrease in serum bilirubin after biliary drainage, CA 19-9 levels remained elevated in 12% of patients in the benign group and in 63% of patients in the malignant group (p<0.001). Finally, 12% of patients in the benign group turned out to have malignant disease. A receiver operating characteristic analysis provided a cut-off value of 38 U/mL for differentiating benign disease from malignant disease after biliary drainage (area under curve, 0.787; 95% confidence interval, 0.703 to 0.871; sensitivity, 62%; specificity, 88%). CONCLUSIONS: This study suggested that we should consider the possibility of malignant causes if the CA 19-9 levels remain high or are more than 38 U/mL after resolution of biliary obstruction.


Subject(s)
Bilirubin , CA-19-9 Antigen , Drainage , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Jaundice, Obstructive , Retrospective Studies , ROC Curve , Sensitivity and Specificity
9.
Journal of Gastric Cancer ; : 167-176, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-216434

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a prior gastrectomy on the difficulty of subsequent colonoscopy, and to identify the surgical factors related to difficult colonoscopies. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with a prior gastrectomy who had undergone a colonoscopy between 2011 and 2014 (n=482) were matched (1:6) to patients with no history of gastrectomy (n=2,892). Cecal insertion time, intubation failure, and bowel clearance score were compared between the gastrectomy and control groups, as was a newly generated comprehensive parameter for a difficult/incomplete colonoscopy (cecal intubation failure, cecal insertion time >12.9 minutes, or very poor bowel preparation scale). Surgical factors including surgical approach, extent of gastrectomy, extent of lymph node dissection, and reconstruction type, were analyzed to identify risk factors for colonoscopy performance. RESULTS: A history of gastrectomy was associated with prolonged cecal insertion time (8.7±6.4 vs. 9.7±6.5 minutes; P=0.002), an increased intubation failure rate (0.1% vs. 1.9%; P<0.001), and a poor bowel preparation rate (24.7 vs. 29.0; P=0.047). Age and total gastrectomy (vs. partial gastrectomy) were found to be independent risk factors for increased insertion time, which slowly increased throughout the postoperative duration (0.35 min/yr). Total gastrectomy was the only independent risk factor for the comprehensive parameter of difficult/incomplete colonoscopy. CONCLUSIONS: History of gastrectomy is related to difficult/incomplete colonoscopy performance, especially in cases of total gastrectomy. In any case, it may be that a pre-operative colonoscopy is desirable in selected patients scheduled for gastrectomy; however, it should be performed by an expert endoscopist each time.


Subject(s)
Colonoscopy , Gastrectomy , Humans , Intubation , Lymph Node Excision , Postoperative Period , Risk Factors
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-149531

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Helicobacter pylori infection induces aberrant DNA methylation in gastric mucosa. We evaluated the long-term effect of H. pylori eradication on promotor CpG island hypermethylation in gastric carcinogenesis. METHODS: H. pylori-positive patients with gastric adenoma or early gastric cancer who underwent endoscopic resection were enrolled. According to H. pylori eradication after endoscopic resection, the participants were randomly assigned to H. pylori eradication or non-eradication group. H. pylori-negative gastric mucosa from normal participants provided the normal control. CpG island hypermethylation of tumor-related genes (p16, CDH1, and RUNX-3) was evaluated by quantitative MethyLight assay in non-tumorous gastric mucosa. The gene methylation rate and median values of hypermethylation were compared after one year by H. pylori status. RESULTS: In H. pylori-positive patients, hypermethylation of p16 was found in 80.6%, of CDH1 in 80.6%, and of RUNX-3 in 48.4%. This is significantly higher than normal control (p16, 10%; CDH1, 44%; RUNX-3, 16%) (p<0.05). In the H. pylori eradication group, methylation rates of p16 and CDH1 decreased in 58.1% and 61.3% of the patients, and the median values of hypermethylation were significantly lower at one year compared with the non-eradication group. However, RUNX-3 hypermethylation did not differ significantly at one year after H. pylori eradication. The non-eradication group hypermethylation did not change after one year. CONCLUSIONS: H. pylori infection was associated with promotor hypermethylation of genes in gastric carcinogenesis, and H. pylori eradication might reverse p16 and CDH1 hypermethylation.


Subject(s)
Adenoma , Carcinogenesis , CpG Islands , DNA Methylation , Gastric Mucosa , Helicobacter pylori , Helicobacter , Humans , Methylation , Stomach Neoplasms
11.
Journal of Gastric Cancer ; : 129-134, 2014.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-7121

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to analyze the effect of screening by using endoscopy on the diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The clinicopathologic characteristics of gastric cancer were compared in individuals who underwent an endoscopy because of symptoms (non-screening group) or for screening purposes (screening group). The distributions of gastric cancer stages and treatment modalities in 2006 and 2011 were compared. RESULTS: The proportion of patients in the screening group increased from 45.1% in 2006 to 65.4% in 2011 (P<0.001). The proportion of stage I cancers in the entire patient sample also increased (from 60.5% in 2006 to 70.6% in 2011; P=0.029). In 2011, the percentages of patients with cancer stages I, II, III, and IV were 79.9%, 8.2%, 10.9%, and 1.1%, respectively, in the screening group, and 47.9%, 10.8%, 29.8%, and 11.5%, respectively, in the non-screening group. The proportion of laparoscopic and robotic surgeries increased from 9.6% in 2006 to 48.3% in 2011 (P<0.001), and endoscopic submucosal dissection increased from 9.8% in 2006 to 19.1% 2011 (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of patients diagnosed with gastric cancer by using the screening program increased between 2006 and 2011. This increase was associated with a high proportion of early-stage cancer diagnoses and increased use of minimally invasive treatments.


Subject(s)
Diagnosis , Early Detection of Cancer , Endoscopy , Humans , Mass Screening , Stomach Neoplasms
12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-91001

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: The role of Helicobacter pylori in gastroesophageal reflux disease remains still controversial and the effect of the organism on severity of reflux esophagitis have been rarely issued. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between H. pylori infection and reflux esophagitis, and especially the severity of reflux esophagitis. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional case-control study of 5,616 subjects undergoing both upper endoscopy and H. pylori serology during health Check-up (2,808 cases vs age- and sex-matched controls). Smoking, alcohol, body mass index and waist circum - ference were added to a multiple regression model. RESULTS: Prevalence of H. pylori infection was lower in cases with reflux esophagitis than in controls (38.4% vs 58.2%, P < 0.001) and negative associations with H. pylori infection continued across the grade of esophagitis (46.7% in Los Angeles classification M [LA-M], 34.3% in LA-A or LA-B and 22.4% in LA-C or LA-D, P < 0.001). Positive serology for H. pylori independently reduced the risk of reflux esophagitis (adjusted OR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.39-0.49). Notably, the negative associations continued across the grade of esophagitis with adjusted ORs of 0.63 in LA-M, 0.36 in LA-A or LA-B and 0.20 in LA-C or LA-D (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In a age-sex matched Korean, H. pylori seropositivity was independently and inversely associated with the risk and severity of reflux esophagitis, suggesting the organism may have a protective role against gastroesophageal reflux disease.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , Case-Control Studies , Electrolytes , Endoscopy , Esophagitis , Esophagitis, Peptic , Gastroesophageal Reflux , Helicobacter , Helicobacter pylori , Los Angeles , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Smoke , Smoking
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