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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-938105

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#We evaluated the clinical significance and prognostic power of functional luminal imaging probe (FLIP) panometry in patients with achalasia treated with peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM), and examined the clinical parameters associated with symptomatic improvement and the presence of contractility (POC) following POEM. @*Methods@#We reviewed the electronic medical records of patients with achalasia treated with FLIP panometry and POEM at a tertiary teaching hospital in Seoul, Republic of Korea. Follow-up examination was composed of esophageal manometry and questionnaires on symptoms. We analyzed the FLIP data by interpolating using the cubic spline method in MATLAB. @*Results@#We retrospectively analyzed 33 men and 35 women (mean age: 52 ± 17 years), of whom 14, 39, and 15 patients were diagnosed with achalasia types I, II, and III, respectively. The FLIP panometry diagnoses were reduced esophagogastric junction opening (REO) with a retrograde contractile response (n = 43); REO with an absent contractile response (n = 5); REO with a normal contractile response (n = 11); and a retrograde contractile response (n = 9). Overall, the patients showed improvements in Eckardt scores following POEM from 6.48 ± 2.20 to 1.16 ± 1.15 (P < 0.01). Post-POEM symptomatic improvement was not significantly associated with any of the clinical parameters, including panometry diagnosis. Conversely, post-POEM POC was significantly associated with the presence of repetitive antegrade contractions and achalasia subtypes (both P < 0.01). @*Conclusion@#While FLIP panometry was not significantly associated with the clinical course of achalasia, FLIP panometry was associated with POC following POEM and may complement manometry in the functional evaluation of esophageal motility disorders.

2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-938061

ABSTRACT

Background@#The rapid urease test (RUT) is a major diagnostic tool for detecting Helicobacter pylori infection. This study aimed to establish an objective method for measuring the color changes in the RUT kit to improve the test’s diagnostic accuracy. @*Methods@#A UV-visible spectrophotometer was selected as the colorimeter; experiments were conducted in three stages to objectively identify the color changes in the RUT kit. @*Results@#First, the urea broth solution showed an identifiable color change from yellow to red as the pH increased by 0.2. The largest transmittance difference detected using the UV-visible spectrophotometer was observed at a 590-nm wavelength. Second, the commercialized RUT kit also showed a gradual color change according to the pH change detected using the UV-visible spectrophotometer. Third, 13 cases of negative RUT results with a biopsy specimen and 16 of positive RUT results were collected. The transmittance detected using the UV-visible spectrophotometer showed a clear division between the positive and negative RUT groups; the largest difference was observed at a 559-nm wavelength. The lowest transmittance in the negative RUT group was 64, while the highest in the positive RUT group was 56, at the 559-nm wavelength. The UV-visible spectrophotometry reading showed a consistency of 92.7% compared with that of manual reading. @*Conclusion@#A transmittance of 60 at a 559-nm wavelength detected using UV-visible spectrophotometer can be used as a cutoff value for interpreting RUT results; this will help develop an automatic RUT kit reader with a high accuracy.

3.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-926280

ABSTRACT

In Korea, the number of screening endoscopies to detect early stage gastric neoplasms has increased exponentially following the active implementation of the National Cancer Screening Program.Current Concepts: Endoscopic treatment, including endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection, is recognized as a minimally invasive treatment method with low morbidity and mortality for gastric dysplasia or early gastric cancer. Owing to improvement in the detection of early gastric cancer and advances in techniques, cases of endoscopic resection have increased and indications have been expanded. Endoscopic resection can preserve gastric function with excellent maintenance of the patient’s quality of life, and previous studies have shown better long-term follow-up outcomes compared to those with surgery. However, the fundamental limitation of endoscopic procedures is that gastric lymph-node dissection is not possible using endoscopic resection.Discussion and Conclusion: Although the usefulness of endoscopic resection is proven for tumors with a very low risk of lymph-node metastasis, follow-up examination using endoscopy and computed tomography should be performed for at least 5 years after curative resection of early gastric cancer.

4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-926155

ABSTRACT

Background@#Extremely well-differentiated adenocarcinoma (EWDA) is a deceptively bland-looking adenocarcinoma of the stomach. It often causes diagnostic problems, especially in endoscopic biopsy samples. To better recognize this deceptively bland lesion, we carefully reviewed a series of EWDAs treated at our institution. @*Methods@#A total of 55 specimens from 19 patients were obtained. Endoscopic, gross and microscopic features defining EWDA were described and documented. For comparison, hyperplastic polyp specimens were randomly selected and analyzed. @*Results@#Most cases (18 of 19, 94.7%) were advanced gastric cancer (AGC) and primarily located in the body of the stomach (15 of 19, 79.0%). The majority of AGCs were non-ulcerated (11 of 18, 61.1%) with an undermining growth pattern and a relatively small mucosal involvement. Specific histologic features included an irregular glandular shape, an undulating apical cytoplasmic border, disproportionately large glands, a variably distended mucinous cytoplasm. Classical features, such as small infiltrating glands or desmoplastic reactions, were barely observed. Identification of irregularly spaced nuclei and disruption of the foveolar epithelial structure, along with atypical features described above were helpful in making a diagnosis especially in gastric forceps biopsies. @*Conclusions@#Awareness of the histomorphologic characteristics described in this report would lead to timely diagnosis and prevent repeated endoscopic procedures.

5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-925919

ABSTRACT

Background@#No definite guidelines for the management of small esophageal subepithelial tumors (SETs) have been established, because there are limited data and studies on their natural history. We aimed to assess the natural history and propose optimal management strategies for small esophageal SETs. @*Methods@#Patients diagnosed as esophageal SETs ≤ 30 mm in size between 2003 and 2017 using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) with a minimal follow-up of 3 months were enrolled, and their esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and EUS were retrospectively reviewed. @*Results@#Of 275 esophageal SETs in 262 patients, the initial size was < 10 mm, 10–20 mm, and 20–30 mm in 104 (37.8%), 105 (38.2%), and 66 (24.0%) lesions, respectively. Only 22 (8.0%) SETs showed significant changes in size and/or echogenicity and/or morphology at a median of 40 months (range, 4–120 months). Tissues of 6 SETs showing interval changes were obtained using EUS-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy; 1 was identified as a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and was surgically resected, while the other 5 were leiomyomas and were regularly observed. Eight SETs showing interval changes were resected surgically or endoscopically without pathological confirmation; 1 was a GIST, 2 were granular cell tumors, and the other 5 were leiomyomas. @*Conclusion@#Regular follow-up with EGD or EUS may be necessary for esophageal SETs ≤ 30 mm in size considering that small portion of them has a possibility of malignant potential. When esophageal SETs ≤ 30 mm show significant interval changes, pathological confirmation may precede treatment to avoid unnecessary resection.

6.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 381-389, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-925798

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#The treatment of superficial esophageal neoplasms (SENs) in cirrhotic patients is challenging and rarely investigated. We evaluated the outcomes of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) to determine the efficacy and safety of treating SENs in patients with liver cirrhosis. @*Methods@#The baseline characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients who underwent ESD for SENs between November 2005 and December 2017 were retrospectively reviewed. @*Results@#ESD was performed in 437 patients with 481 SENs, including 15 cirrhotic patients with 17 SENs. En bloc resection (88.2% vs. 97.0%) and curative resection (64.7% vs. 78.9%) rates were not different between the cirrhosis and non-cirrhosis groups (p=0.105 and p=0.224, respectively). Bleeding was more common in cirrhotic patients (p=0.054), and all cases were successfully controlled endoscopically. The median procedure and hospitalization duration did not differ between the groups. Overall survival was lower in cirrhotic patients (p=0.003), while disease-specific survival did not differ between the groups (p=0.85). @*Conclusions@#ESD could be a safe and effective treatment option for SENs in patients with cirrhosis. Detailed preprocedural assessments are needed, including determination of liver function, esophageal varix status, and remaining life expectancy, to identify patients who will obtain the greatest benefit.

7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-925688

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#This study aimed to evaluate the real-world efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), and to identify clinicolaboratory factors to predict treatment outcomes in patients with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) receiving ICIs. @*Materials and Methods@#Sixty patients with metastatic or unresectable ESCC treated with nivolumab (n=48) or pembrolizumab (n=12) as ≥ second-line treatment between 2016 and 2019 at Asan Medical Center were included. @*Results@#The median age of the patients was 68 years (range, 52 to 76 years), and 93.3% were male. Most patients had metastatic disease (81.7%) and had been previously treated with fluoropyrimidines, platinum, and taxane. In 53 patients with measurable disease, the overall response rate and disease control rate were 15.1% and 35.8%, respectively. With a median follow-up duration of 16.0 months, the median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 1.9 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.54 to 2.19) and 6.4 months (95% CI, 4.77 to 8.11), respectively. After multivariate analysis, recent use of antibiotics, low prognostic nutrition index (< 35.93), high Glasgow Prognosis Score (≥ 1) at baseline, and ≥ 1.4-fold increase in neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio after one cycle from baseline were significantly unfavorable factors for both PFS and OS. Younger age (< 65 years) was a significant factor for unfavorable PFS and hyponatremia (< 135 mmol/L) for unfavorable OS. @*Conclusion@#The use of ICIs after the failure of chemotherapy showed comparable efficacy in patients with advanced ESCC in real practice; this may be associated with host immune-nutritional status, which could be predicted by clinical and routine laboratory factors.

8.
Gut and Liver ; : 198-206, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-925006

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Postprocedural bleeding is known to be relatively low after argon plasma coagulation (APC) for gastric neoplasms; however, there are few studies proving the effect of antithrombotic agents. This study aimed to analyze the incidence of delayed bleeding (DB) based on antithrombotic agents administered and to identify the risk factors for DB in APC for gastric tumors. @*Methods@#A total of 785 patients with 824 lesions underwent APC for single gastric neoplasm between January 2011 and January 2018. After exclusion, 719 and 102 lesions were classified as belonging to the non-antithrombotics (non-AT) and AT groups, respectively. The clinical outcomes were compared between the two groups, and we determined the risk factors for DB in gastric APC. @*Results@#Of the total 821 cases, DB occurred in 20 cases (2.4%): 17 cases in the non-AT group and three cases in the AT group (2.4% vs 2.9%, p=0.728). Multivariate analysis of the risk factors for DB confirmed the following significant, independent risk factors: male sex (odds ratio, 7.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 57.69; p=0.048) and chronic kidney disease (odds ratio, 4.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.57 to 13.02; p=0.005). Thromboembolic events and perforation were not observed in all patients regardless of whether they took AT agents. @*Conclusions@#AT therapy is acceptably safe in gastric APC because it does not significantly increase the incidence of DB. However, patients with chronic kidney disease or male sex need to receive careful follow-up on the incidence of post-APC bleeding.

9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-903620

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#The learning curve is essential in endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) training to improve outcomes and reduce the risk of procedure-related complications. We compared the outcomes of gastric ESD in live pigs performed by inexperienced endoscopists with or without ex vivo training. @*Materials and Methods@#At the Olympus Medical Training and Education Center, nine endoscopists inexperienced in ESD were randomly divided into two groups (group A: ex vivo training followed by in vivo training; group B: in vivo training only), and they performed gastric ESDs. @*Results@#A total of 18 ESDs were performed. The en bloc resection rate was 88.9% (16/18), and the complete resection rate was 94.4% (17/18). The median specimen size was 2.5 cm in group A and 2.1 cm in group B (P=0.227). There was no significant difference in the procedure time between the two groups, except for the marking time (0′58″ vs. 2′58″, P=0.027). However, group A took a shorter time in dissecting the same area than group B (109 vs. 246 sec/cm2, P=0.083). Complication rates were not significantly different between both groups. @*Conclusions@#The procedure time during in vivo ESD training in pigs may be shortened by prior ex vivo training. However, the ex vivo model presented poor air inflation, unstable fixation, and excessive mucosal hardness for cutting. An advanced simulator or sufficient ex vivo training may be effective in training for the ESD procedure.

10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-899846

ABSTRACT

Background@#Endoscopic surveillance after total gastrectomy (TG) for gastric cancer is routinely performed to detect tumor recurrence and postoperative adverse events.However, the reports on the clinical benefits of endoscopic surveillance are ambiguous. We investigated the clinical benefit of endoscopic surveillance after TG for gastric cancer. @*Methods@#We analyzed 848 patients who underwent TG with R0 resection for gastric cancer between 2011 and 2012 (380 early gastric cancer and 468 advanced gastric cancer) and underwent regular postoperative surveillance with endoscopy and abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) with contrast. @*Results@#Median follow-up periods were 58 months for both endoscopy (range, 3–96) and abdominopelvic CT (range, 1–96). Tumor recurrence occurred in 167 patients (19.7%), of whom seven (4.2%) were locoregional recurrences in the peri-anastomotic area (n = 5) or regional gastric lymph nodes (n = 2). Whereas the peri-anastomotic recurrences were detected by both endoscopy and abdominopelvic CT, regional lymph node recurrences were only detected by abdominopelvic CT. Out of the 23 events of postoperative adverse events, the majority (87%) were detected by radiologic examinations; three events of benign strictures in the anastomotic site were detected only by endoscopy. @*Conclusion@#Endoscopic surveillance did not have a significant role in detecting locoregional tumor recurrence and postoperative adverse events after TG with R0 resection for gastric cancer. Routine endoscopic surveillance after TG may be considered optional and performed according to the capacities of each clinical setting.

11.
Gut and Liver ; : 705-712, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-898478

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Data regarding the prognosis of early esophageal cancer are lacking. This study investigated the long-term outcomes and factors affecting the survival of patients with mucosal esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (T1aESCC). @*Methods@#We analyzed the clinical and tumor-specific parameters of 263 patients who received surgical resection (SR; n=63) or endoscopic resection (ER; n=200) for T1aESCC. Underlying comorbidities were scored using the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). Overall survival (OS) was the primary outcome, and multivariate regression analysis was performed to predict factors for OS. @*Results@#Of the study patients (age, 64.5±8.0 years), the CCI was 1.0±1.4 in the ER group and 0.6±0.9 in the SR group (p=0.107). The 5-year OS rate during follow-up (54.4±20.4 months) was 85.7% (ER group, 86.8%; SR group, 82.4%; p=0.631). The cumulative 5-year incidence of esophageal cancer recurrence was 10.5% in the ER group (vs 0% in the SR group). The overall mortality rate was 12.9% (ER group, 12.0%; SR group, 15.9%; p=0.399). The most common cause of mortality was second primary cancers in the ER group (75%) and organ dysfunction or postoperative complications in the SR group (70%). According to multivariate analysis, only CCI was significantly associated with OS (p2 and in those with a CCI ≤2 was 60.2% and 88.2%, respectively (p<0.001). The treatment method (ER vs SR) was not a significant affecting factor (p=0.238). @*Conclusions@#The long-term prognosis of patients with T1aESCC was significantly associated with underlying comorbidities.

12.
Gut and Liver ; : 723-731, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-898474

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#This study examined the long-term outcomes of undifferentiated-type early gastric cancer (UD EGC) with positive horizontal margins (HMs) after endoscopic resection (ER) and compared them between additional surgery and nonsurgical management. @*Methods@#From 2005 to 2015, a total of 1,124 patients with UD EGC underwent ER at 18 tertiary hospitals in Korea. Of them, 92 patients with positive HMs as the only noncurative factor (n=25) or with both positive HMs and tumor size >2 cm (n=67) were included. These patients underwent additional surgery (n=40), underwent additional endoscopic treatment (n=6), or were followed up without further treatment (n=46). @*Results@#No lymph node (LN) metastasis was found in patients who underwent additional surgery. During a median follow-up of 57.7 months (interquartile range, 27.6 to 68.8 months), no LN or distant metastases or gastric cancer-related deaths occurred in the overall cohort. At baseline, the residual cancer rate was 57.8% (26/45) after additional surgery or ER. The 5-year local recurrence rate was 33.6% among patients who were followed up without additional treatment. The 5-year overall survival rates were 95.0% and 87.8% after additional surgery and nonsurgical management (endoscopic treatment or close follow-up), respectively (log-rank p=0.224). In the multivariate Cox regression analysis, nonsurgical management was not associated with an increased risk of mortality. @*Conclusions@#UD EGC with positive HMs after ER may have favorable long-term outcomes and a very low risk of LN metastasis. Nonsurgical management may be suggested as an alternative, particularly for patients with old age or chronic illness.

13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-897420

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The association of serum lipids with gastric cancer is controversial. We clarified the role of serum lipids in the development, progression, and prognosis of gastric cancer. @*Materials and Methods@#In total, 412 patients diagnosed with gastric cancer were prospectively recruited, and 2,934 control subjects who underwent screening endoscopy were enrolled from December 2013 to March 2017 to conduct a case-control study in a tertiary center. Serum lipid profiles, including total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglyceride (TG), apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), and apolipoprotein B, and clinicopathologic characteristics were analyzed. @*Results@#The gastric cancer group showed significantly lower HDL-C, higher LDL-C, and lower apoA-I level than the control group. In multivariate analysis, old age (odds ratio [OR], 1.051; p < 0.001), smoking (OR, 1.337; p < 0.001), a family history of gastric cancer (OR, 2.038; p < 0.001), Helicobacter pylori seropositivity (OR, 4.240; p < 0.001), lower HDL-C (OR, 0.712; p=0.020), and higher LDL-C (p=0.002) were significant risk factors for gastric cancer. Lower HDL-C and higher LDL-C remained significant after adjustments for covariates, including age and sex. In a subgroup analysis of the gastric cancer group, lower TG levels were associated with undifferentiated histology. No serum lipids were associated with overall survival. @*Conclusion@#Lower HDL-C and higher LDL-C were associated with the risk of gastric cancer, even after adjusting for age, sex, and other factors. In the gastric cancer group, undifferentiated histology was associated with lower TG levels.

14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-895916

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#The learning curve is essential in endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) training to improve outcomes and reduce the risk of procedure-related complications. We compared the outcomes of gastric ESD in live pigs performed by inexperienced endoscopists with or without ex vivo training. @*Materials and Methods@#At the Olympus Medical Training and Education Center, nine endoscopists inexperienced in ESD were randomly divided into two groups (group A: ex vivo training followed by in vivo training; group B: in vivo training only), and they performed gastric ESDs. @*Results@#A total of 18 ESDs were performed. The en bloc resection rate was 88.9% (16/18), and the complete resection rate was 94.4% (17/18). The median specimen size was 2.5 cm in group A and 2.1 cm in group B (P=0.227). There was no significant difference in the procedure time between the two groups, except for the marking time (0′58″ vs. 2′58″, P=0.027). However, group A took a shorter time in dissecting the same area than group B (109 vs. 246 sec/cm2, P=0.083). Complication rates were not significantly different between both groups. @*Conclusions@#The procedure time during in vivo ESD training in pigs may be shortened by prior ex vivo training. However, the ex vivo model presented poor air inflation, unstable fixation, and excessive mucosal hardness for cutting. An advanced simulator or sufficient ex vivo training may be effective in training for the ESD procedure.

15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-892142

ABSTRACT

Background@#Endoscopic surveillance after total gastrectomy (TG) for gastric cancer is routinely performed to detect tumor recurrence and postoperative adverse events.However, the reports on the clinical benefits of endoscopic surveillance are ambiguous. We investigated the clinical benefit of endoscopic surveillance after TG for gastric cancer. @*Methods@#We analyzed 848 patients who underwent TG with R0 resection for gastric cancer between 2011 and 2012 (380 early gastric cancer and 468 advanced gastric cancer) and underwent regular postoperative surveillance with endoscopy and abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) with contrast. @*Results@#Median follow-up periods were 58 months for both endoscopy (range, 3–96) and abdominopelvic CT (range, 1–96). Tumor recurrence occurred in 167 patients (19.7%), of whom seven (4.2%) were locoregional recurrences in the peri-anastomotic area (n = 5) or regional gastric lymph nodes (n = 2). Whereas the peri-anastomotic recurrences were detected by both endoscopy and abdominopelvic CT, regional lymph node recurrences were only detected by abdominopelvic CT. Out of the 23 events of postoperative adverse events, the majority (87%) were detected by radiologic examinations; three events of benign strictures in the anastomotic site were detected only by endoscopy. @*Conclusion@#Endoscopic surveillance did not have a significant role in detecting locoregional tumor recurrence and postoperative adverse events after TG with R0 resection for gastric cancer. Routine endoscopic surveillance after TG may be considered optional and performed according to the capacities of each clinical setting.

16.
Gut and Liver ; : 705-712, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-890774

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Data regarding the prognosis of early esophageal cancer are lacking. This study investigated the long-term outcomes and factors affecting the survival of patients with mucosal esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (T1aESCC). @*Methods@#We analyzed the clinical and tumor-specific parameters of 263 patients who received surgical resection (SR; n=63) or endoscopic resection (ER; n=200) for T1aESCC. Underlying comorbidities were scored using the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). Overall survival (OS) was the primary outcome, and multivariate regression analysis was performed to predict factors for OS. @*Results@#Of the study patients (age, 64.5±8.0 years), the CCI was 1.0±1.4 in the ER group and 0.6±0.9 in the SR group (p=0.107). The 5-year OS rate during follow-up (54.4±20.4 months) was 85.7% (ER group, 86.8%; SR group, 82.4%; p=0.631). The cumulative 5-year incidence of esophageal cancer recurrence was 10.5% in the ER group (vs 0% in the SR group). The overall mortality rate was 12.9% (ER group, 12.0%; SR group, 15.9%; p=0.399). The most common cause of mortality was second primary cancers in the ER group (75%) and organ dysfunction or postoperative complications in the SR group (70%). According to multivariate analysis, only CCI was significantly associated with OS (p2 and in those with a CCI ≤2 was 60.2% and 88.2%, respectively (p<0.001). The treatment method (ER vs SR) was not a significant affecting factor (p=0.238). @*Conclusions@#The long-term prognosis of patients with T1aESCC was significantly associated with underlying comorbidities.

17.
Gut and Liver ; : 723-731, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-890770

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#This study examined the long-term outcomes of undifferentiated-type early gastric cancer (UD EGC) with positive horizontal margins (HMs) after endoscopic resection (ER) and compared them between additional surgery and nonsurgical management. @*Methods@#From 2005 to 2015, a total of 1,124 patients with UD EGC underwent ER at 18 tertiary hospitals in Korea. Of them, 92 patients with positive HMs as the only noncurative factor (n=25) or with both positive HMs and tumor size >2 cm (n=67) were included. These patients underwent additional surgery (n=40), underwent additional endoscopic treatment (n=6), or were followed up without further treatment (n=46). @*Results@#No lymph node (LN) metastasis was found in patients who underwent additional surgery. During a median follow-up of 57.7 months (interquartile range, 27.6 to 68.8 months), no LN or distant metastases or gastric cancer-related deaths occurred in the overall cohort. At baseline, the residual cancer rate was 57.8% (26/45) after additional surgery or ER. The 5-year local recurrence rate was 33.6% among patients who were followed up without additional treatment. The 5-year overall survival rates were 95.0% and 87.8% after additional surgery and nonsurgical management (endoscopic treatment or close follow-up), respectively (log-rank p=0.224). In the multivariate Cox regression analysis, nonsurgical management was not associated with an increased risk of mortality. @*Conclusions@#UD EGC with positive HMs after ER may have favorable long-term outcomes and a very low risk of LN metastasis. Nonsurgical management may be suggested as an alternative, particularly for patients with old age or chronic illness.

18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-889716

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The association of serum lipids with gastric cancer is controversial. We clarified the role of serum lipids in the development, progression, and prognosis of gastric cancer. @*Materials and Methods@#In total, 412 patients diagnosed with gastric cancer were prospectively recruited, and 2,934 control subjects who underwent screening endoscopy were enrolled from December 2013 to March 2017 to conduct a case-control study in a tertiary center. Serum lipid profiles, including total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglyceride (TG), apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), and apolipoprotein B, and clinicopathologic characteristics were analyzed. @*Results@#The gastric cancer group showed significantly lower HDL-C, higher LDL-C, and lower apoA-I level than the control group. In multivariate analysis, old age (odds ratio [OR], 1.051; p < 0.001), smoking (OR, 1.337; p < 0.001), a family history of gastric cancer (OR, 2.038; p < 0.001), Helicobacter pylori seropositivity (OR, 4.240; p < 0.001), lower HDL-C (OR, 0.712; p=0.020), and higher LDL-C (p=0.002) were significant risk factors for gastric cancer. Lower HDL-C and higher LDL-C remained significant after adjustments for covariates, including age and sex. In a subgroup analysis of the gastric cancer group, lower TG levels were associated with undifferentiated histology. No serum lipids were associated with overall survival. @*Conclusion@#Lower HDL-C and higher LDL-C were associated with the risk of gastric cancer, even after adjusting for age, sex, and other factors. In the gastric cancer group, undifferentiated histology was associated with lower TG levels.

19.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-918978

ABSTRACT

An esophageal perforation is one of the most fatal clinical events, with a mortality rate of up to 21%. This may arise postoperatively or post-endoscopically. In the past, surgical treatment, such as an esophagectomy, was performed these cases. However, the procedure was challenging and had a high risk of postoperative complications. Recently, advancements in endoscopic techniques have been made, and endoscopic procedures became a common treatment modality for patients with esophageal perforation, even in those with underlying diseases. Among the endoscopic procedures, endoscopic vacuum-assisted closure (E-VAC) has been known to be safe and effective. We present the case of a 64-year-old female with advanced liver cirrhosis and an overtube-induced esophageal perforation during esophageal variceal ligation. She was successfully treated with E-VAC.

20.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 798-804, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-913983

ABSTRACT

While perforations, postoperative fistulas, and leaks have traditionally led to surgical or interventional radiology consultation for management, the introduction of the over-the-scope clip has allowed increased therapeutic possibilities for endoscopists. While primarily limited to case reports and series, the over-the-scope clip successfully manages gastrointestinal bleeding, perforations, as well as postoperative leaks and fistulas. Retrospective studies have demonstrated a relatively high success rate and a low complication rate. Given the similarity to variceal banding equipment, the learning curve with the over-the-scope clip is rapid. However, given the higher risk of procedures involving the use of the over-the-scope clip, it is essential to obtain the scope in a stable position and grasp sufficient tissue with the cap using a grasping tool and/or suction. From our experience, while closure may be successful in lesions sized up to 3 cm, successful outcomes are obtained for lesions sized <1 cm. Ultimately, given the limited available data, prospective randomized trials are needed to better evaluate the utility of the over-the-scope clip in various clinical scenarios, including fistula and perforation management.

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