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1.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-913076

ABSTRACT

An imported case of acute schistosomiasis was reported in Wuhan City in 2020. The case was infected with Schistosoma by contact with the infested water due to playing water in the Yangtze River when working out of Hubei Province. The patient visited four medical institutions and the duration from onset to definitive diagnosis was 20 days. The patient’s low awareness of schistosomiasis prevention and control knowledge and lack of diagnosis and treatment awareness for schistosomiasis among medical institutions were considered as main causes of the development of acute schistosomiasis and progression to severe case. Intensifying schistosomiasis health education among mobile populations and improving the awareness and capability of early diagnosis of schistosomiasis among clinicians are recommended.

2.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-772625

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE@#This study aims to compare the osteogenic differentiation capability of stem cells derived from human inflammatory periodontal ligament tissues (iPDLSCs) with those of stem cells derived from healthy periodontal ligament tissues (hPDLSCs). Both types of tissues were induced by stromal cell derived factor (SDF-1) in vitro.@*METHODS@#iPDLSCs and hPDLSCs were primarily cultured by tissue digestion method and purified by limited dilution cloning. The cells were passaged and identified by stem cell surface marker expression through flow cytometry. Then, we used thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide to detect and compare the proliferation capabilities of the iPDLSCs and hPDLSCs. Express of bone volumes were detected by alizarin red staining after SDF-1 was added to the cells. Using alkaline phosphatase, we evaluated the osteogenic differentiation capability of the cells induced by SDF-1. The expression levels of the osteogenesis-related genes of the cells induced by SDF-1 were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.@*RESULTS@#After purification, both iPDLSCs and hPDLSCs expressed stem cell markers. hPDLCSs had a higher proliferation capability than iPDLSCs. Osteogenesis-related genes had higher expression levels in the cells induced by SDF-1 than in those without induction (P<0.05). SDF-1 at 50 and 200 ng·mL⁻¹ concentration greatly affected the differen-tiation capabilities of iPDLSCs and hPDLSCs respectively.@*CONCLUSIONS@#iPDLSCs and hPDLSCs had osteogenic differentia-tion capability. The level of osteogenic differentiation in normal and inflamed periodontal ligament stem cells increases after SDF-1 induction.


Subject(s)
Cell Differentiation , Cell Proliferation , Cells, Cultured , Humans , Osteogenesis , Periodontal Ligament , Stem Cells , Stromal Cells
3.
Microbiology ; (12)2008.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-686035

ABSTRACT

In order to demonstrate the taxonomic position of paramyxovirus Tianjin strain and explore its mechanism of pathogenesis. Bioinformatics methods were used to analyze the deduced amino acid sequences of NP, P, M, and L protein of Tianjin strain. Phylogenetic analysis based on NP, P, M, and L protein sequences demonstrated that Tianjin strain belonged to the genus Respirovirus, in the subfamily Paramyxovirinae and most likely a new genotype of Sendai virus. Sequence similarities comparisons indicated that Tianjin strain P protein was poorly conserved, sharing only 78.7%~91.9% amino acid identity with 6 known Sendai viruses, while L protein was the most conserved, having 96.0%~98.0% amino acid identity with other Sendai viruses. Multiple-sequence alignments of Tianjin strain NP, P, M, and L protein with those of 6 known Sendai viruses showed that Tianjin strain possessed a lot of unique amino acid substitutions in protein sequences, 15 in NP, 29 in P, 6 in M, and 29 in L. The presence of these unique amino acid substitutions suggests that Tianjin strain maybe has a significant difference in host or pathological characteristics from the known Sendai viruses.

4.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-311484

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To compare the effects of dust exposure and smoking on mortality of respiratory system diseases (RSD).</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Based on the Guangzhou Occupational Health Surveillance Record System established between 1989 and 1992, 80,987 factory workers, aged 30 years old or older, occupationally exposed or not exposed to dusts, were included in a prospective cohort study.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>(1) The mean age of the cohort was 43.5. Most subjects were workers, had secondary education, and almost all were married. The dust exposure rate was 16.3%, the smoking rate 43.7% and the alcohol-drinking rate 33.5%. (2) The cohort was followed up for 8 years on average, but 35 people (0.04%) were lost for follow up. Among the 1593 deaths, 219 and 90 people died of lung cancer and non-cancer respiratory system diseases (NCRSD) respectively. (3) The adjusted relative risk (RR) of death of lung cancer for smokers, 3.32, was 2.2 times of that for dust exposed workers, 1.53, and the RR of death of NCRSD for dust exposed workers, 2.41, 1.28 times of that for smokers, 1.89, especially for silica dust-exposed workers, 5.72, 3.03 times of that for smokers. Dust exposure combined with smoking caused significantly higher RR of death of RSD. (4) In male, the death risks of RSD were increased with the amount of smoking per day and years of smoking.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>Occupational dust exposure and smoking may cause excessive lung cancer and NCRSD death with synergistic effects. Smoking has higher RR of Lung cancer death than dust exposure. However, the dust exposure contributes to higher RR of NCRSD death. There is a significant dose-effect relationship between smoking and the death risk of RSD.</p>


Subject(s)
Adult , China , Epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Dust , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Exposure , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Tract Diseases , Mortality , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Smoking
5.
Chinese Journal of Epidemiology ; (12): 748-752, 2004.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-247482

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To compare the effects of dust exposure and smoking on mortality.</p><p><b>METHODS</b>Based on the Guangzhou Occupational Health Surveillance Record System established in 1989-1992, 80 987 factory workers, aged > or = 30, occupationally exposed to dust and non-exposure to dust, were included in a prospective cohort study.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>(1) The mean age of the cohort was 43.5. Most subjects were workers, with secondary education, and married. Out of them 16.3% having ever exposed to dust, 43.7% ever smoked and 33.5% drank alcohol. (2) The cohort were traced for 8 years on average, but 35 were lost for follow-up. Malignant neoplasm was most commonly seen among 1539 deaths. (3) The adjusted relative risk (RRs) of death of all causes, malignant neoplasm and cerebro-cardiovascular diseases for dust exposed workers were close to those for smokers. However, the adjusted RRs of death of nasopharynx cancer and respiratory system diseases for dust exposed workers were higher than those for smokers. The adjusted RRs of death of lung cancer and stomach cancer for smokers were 2.2 times and 1.5 times of that for dust exposed workers respectively. Dust exposure combined with smoking caused significantly higher death RR. (4) In males, the adjusted RRs of death of all causes, malignant neoplasm and respiratory system diseases for silica dust exposed workers and the adjusted RR of death of cerebro-cardiovascular diseases for wood dust exposed workers were higher those in smokers. (5) The population attributable risk percentage (PARP) of all causes of death for smokers was 2.5 times of that for dust exposed workers. (6) In males, the risks of death for all causes, malignant neoplasm, lung cancer and stomach cancer increased with the amount of smoking per day and the duration of smoking. The risks of death caused by coronary heart disease and respiratory system diseases were increasing with the amount of smoking per day and the duration of smoking respectively.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b>The adjusted RRs for dust exposed workers were close to those for smokers with dust exposure and smoking having synergistic effects. Some of the adjusted RRs for smokers were higher than those for dust exposed workers PARP for smokers was higher than that for dust exposed workers. Our findings suggested that there was a significant dose-effect between smoking and risk of deaths.</p>


Subject(s)
Adult , Cause of Death , China , Epidemiology , Coal , Cohort Studies , Dust , Female , Humans , Male , Occupational Exposure , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , Silicon Dioxide , Smoking
6.
Article in Chinese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-272068

ABSTRACT

<p><b>OBJECTIVE</b>To study the relative risk (RR) of mortalities of cerebro-cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in Guangzhou workers with hypertension.</p><p><b>METHOD</b>Prospective cohort study was conducted in 78,379 workers, aged >or= 35, from 399 factories. Cox regression model were mainly used for data analysis.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>(1) There were 48,705 male and 29,674 female workers in the cohort. All workers were followed-up for 8 years. 363 CVD deaths (male 305, female 58) mainly died of stroke, coronary heart disease and hypertension. The crude mortalities were 78.58/100,000 person years in male and 24.55/100,000 person years in female. (2) Compared with the optimal or normal blood pressure (ONBP), the RR (95%) of CVD deaths with high blood pressure (HBP) were 6.19 (4.85 - 7.91) in male and 2.78 (1.59 - 4.85) in female. In male, compared with ONBP, the RR of CVD deaths without illness but with 1st-grade HBP at baseline, and of those suffered non-CVD but with 1st-grade HBP at baseline, and of those suffered CVD with 2nd-grade HBP at baseline were 3.98, 3.25 and 3.15 respectively (P < 0.01). (3) After stratifying of age, smoking, drinking, educational levels and occupational exposure, the RR of CVD deaths was higher in those who were younger, or ever-smoking, non-drinking, higher educational level, exposed to occupational hazards and with hypertension.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>There is relationship between BP levels and CVD mortality. High BP may affect CVD deaths at younger age. Comprehensive measures should be used to reduce the risk of CVD deaths.</p>


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Blood Pressure , Cardiovascular Diseases , Mortality , Cerebrovascular Disorders , Mortality , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies
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