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1.
Intestinal Research ; : 62-70, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-874639

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR) can serve as biomarkers for diagnosing and assessing disease activity in ulcerative colitis (UC). We investigated their clinical significance in UC. @*Methods@#We analyzed 48 patients with UC who underwent measurement of fecal calprotectin (FC) and endoscopy and 96 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. NLR and PLR were compared between the patients and healthy controls. The endoscopic activity was divided into 2 groups: group 1 (mild to moderate inflammation) and group 2 (severe inflammation) according to the Mayo endoscopic subscore in UC. @*Results@#To diagnose UC, the optimal cutoff of NLR and PLR was 2.26 (sensitivity 54.2%; specificity 90.6%; positive likelihood ratio 5.778, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.944–11.339; area under the curve [AUC] 0.774, 95% CI, 0.690–0.859) and 179.8 (sensitivity 35.4%; specificity 90.6%; positive likelihood ratio 3.778, 95% CI 1.821–7.838; AUC 0.654, 95% CI 0.556–0.753), respectively. The optimal cutoff to differentiate group 1 and group 2 was 3.44, 175.9, and 453 µg/g for NLR, PLR, and FC, respectively (sensitivity, 63.6% vs. 90.9% vs. 81.8%; specificity, 81.1% vs. 78.4% vs. 73.0%; positive likelihood ratio, 3.364 vs. 4.205 vs. 3.027; AUC, 0.714 vs. 0.897 vs. 0.813). PLR had the highest AUC and positive likelihood ratio. @*Conclusions@#NLR and PLR help differentiate patients with UC from healthy controls. NLR, PLR, and FC indicate endoscopic activity and may reflect intestinal mucosal conditions.

2.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-833865

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#We aimed to evaluate associations between comorbidities, peripheral neuropathy, and spontaneous internal anal sphincter relaxation (SAR) in patients with defecatory disorders. @*Methods@#A patient was considered to exhibit SAR during high-resolution anorectal manometry (HR-ARM) when the nadir pressure is < 15 mmHg and the time from onset to relaxation was ≥ 15 seconds in the resting pressure frame. A case-control study was performed using HR-ARM data collected from 880 patients from January 2010 to May 2015. We identified 23 cases with SAR (median age 75 years; 15 females; 12 fecal incontinence and 11 constipation). We compared HR-ARM values, Charlson index comorbidity scores, neuropathy, and the prevalence of diseases that potentially cause neuropathy between controls and SAR patients. Each SAR case was compared to 3 controls. Controls were selected to match the age, gender, and examination year of each SAR case. @*Results@#Compared to controls (26.1%), SAR patients (52.2%) exhibited a significantly higher frequency of fecal incontinence. SAR patients also had higher Charlson index scores (5 vs 4, P = 0.028). Nine of 23 SAR patients (39.1%) exhibited peripheral neuropathy— this frequency was higher than that for the control group (11.6%; P = 0.003). Diseases that potentially cause neuropathy were observed in 17 of 23 SAR cases and 32 of 69 controls (P = 0.022). @*Conclusions@#SAR develops in patients with constipation and fecal incontinence but is more common in patients with fecal incontinence. Our controlled observational study implies that SAR is associated with peripheral neuropathy and more severe comorbidities.

3.
Intestinal Research ; : 516-526, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-785864

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: When determining the subsequent management after endoscopic resection of the early colon cancer (ECC), various factors including the margin status should be considered. This study assessed the subsequent management and outcomes of ECCs according to margin status.METHODS: We examined the data of 223 ECCs treated by endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) from 215 patients during 2004 to 2014, and all patients were followed-up at least for 2 years.RESULTS: According to histological analyses, the margin statuses of all lesions after EMR were as follows: 138 cases (61.9%) were negative, 65 cases (29.1%) were positive for dysplastic cells on the resection margins, and 20 cases (8.9%) were uncertain. The decision regarding subsequent management was affected not only by pathologic outcomes but also by the endoscopist’s opinion on whether complete resection was obtained. Surgery was preferred if the lesion extended to the submucosa (odds ratio [OR], 25.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 7.09–91.42), the endoscopic resection was presumed incomplete (OR, 15.55; 95% CI, 4.28–56.56), or the lymph system was invaded (OR, 13.69; 95% CI, 1.76–106.57). Fourteen patients (6.2%) had residual or recurrent malignancies at the site of the previous ECC resection and were significantly associated with presumed incomplete endoscopic resection (OR, 4.59; 95% CI, 1.21–17.39) and submucosal invasion (OR, 5.14; 95% CI, 1.18–22.34).CONCLUSIONS: Subsequent surgery was associated with submucosa invasion, lymphatic invasion, and cancer-positive margins. Presumed completeness of the resection may be helpful for guiding the subsequent management of patients who undergo endoscopic resection of ECC.


Subject(s)
Colon , Colonic Neoplasms , Humans
4.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 426-430, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-763478

ABSTRACT

The Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy introduced the Accredited Endoscopy Unit Program to enhance endoscopy unit quality through systematic quality management in 2012. It was gradually expanded from training hospitals to institutions with 100+ beds, and the criteria for certification were applied according to the actual conditions of each institution. On the basis of the continuous communication with the institutions and feedback, the Accredited Endoscopy Unit Program certification criteria were revised in 2019 and introduced as follows: (1) the qualification criteria for endoscopy doctors and nurses; (2) facilities and equipment; (3) endoscopic examination process; (4) performance; (5) disinfection and infection control; and (6) endoscopic sedation. The assessment items consist of essential and recommended items. All essential items must be met for accreditation to be awarded. The assessment criteria for each evaluation area were revised as follows: (1) upgrading assessment criteria; (2) qualification of endoscopists and reinforcement of quality control education; (3) detailed standards for safety, disinfection, endoscopic sedation, and management instructions; and (4) presentation of new performance measurement of endoscopy and colonoscopy.


Subject(s)
Accreditation , Awards and Prizes , Certification , Colonoscopy , Disinfection , Education , Endoscopy , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal , Infection Control , Korea , Quality Control
5.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 239-252, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-714598

ABSTRACT

Gastroscopy and colonoscopy are widely used for the early diagnosis of stomach and colorectal cancer. The present revision integrates recent data regarding previous quality indicators and novel indicators suggested for gastroscopy and colonoscopy procedures for the National Cancer Screening Program in Korea. The new indicators, developed by the Quality Improvement Committee of the Korean Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, vary in the level of supporting evidence, and most are based solely on expert opinion. Updated indicators validated by clinical research were prioritized, but were chosen by expert consensus when such studies were absent. The resultant quality indicators were graded according to the levels of consensus and recommendations. The updated indicators will provide a relevant guideline for high-quality endoscopy. The future direction of quality indicator development should include relevant outcome measures and an evidence-based approach to support proposed performance targets.


Subject(s)
Colonoscopy , Colorectal Neoplasms , Consensus , Early Detection of Cancer , Early Diagnosis , Endoscopy , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal , Expert Testimony , Gastroscopy , Korea , Mass Screening , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Quality Improvement , Stomach
6.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-714521

ABSTRACT

Gastroscopy and colonoscopy are widely used for the early diagnosis of stomach and colorectal cancer. The present revision integrates recent data regarding previous quality indicators and novel indicators suggested for gastroscopy and colonoscopy procedures for the National Cancer Screening Program in Korea. The new indicators, developed by the Quality Improvement Committee of the Korean Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, vary in the level of supporting evidence, and most are based solely on expert opinion. Updated indicators validated by clinical research were prioritized, but were chosen by expert consensus when such studies were absent. The resultant quality indicators were graded according to the levels of consensus and recommendations. The updated indicators will provide a relevant guideline for high-quality endoscopy. The future direction of quality indicator development should include relevant outcome measures and an evidence-based approach to support proposed performance targets.


Subject(s)
Colonoscopy , Colorectal Neoplasms , Consensus , Early Detection of Cancer , Early Diagnosis , Endoscopy , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal , Expert Testimony , Gastroscopy , Korea , Mass Screening , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Quality Improvement , Stomach
7.
Intestinal Research ; : 467-474, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-197217

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Although the role of capsule endoscopy (CE) in Crohn's disease (CD) has expanded, CE is not used routinely for diagnosing and evaluating CD in Korea. We aimed to investigate current patterns of practice and evaluate the clinical significance of the use of CE in CD in Korean patients. METHODS: Among 651 CE procedures performed for various indications, we retrospectively analyzed the medical records of patients who underwent CE in 57 cases of suspected CD (sCD) and 14 cases of established CD (eCD). RESULTS: In the sCD group, CE was most commonly used for the initial diagnosis of CD (54.4%). Capsule retention was found in only 1 patient in the eCD group (1/71, 1.4%). In the sCD group, 28.1% of patients were diagnosed with CD on the basis of CE findings; other diseases diagnosed included tuberculous enteritis (7.0%), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced enteropathy (5.3%), and other enteritis (17.5%). Only 11.5% of patients with eCD (14/122) underwent CE. The indication for CE in the 14 patients with eCD was to assess disease extent and activity. The overall diagnostic yield of CE was 59.7%. Therapeutic strategies were changed in 70.2% of patients in the sCD group and 50% of those in the eCD group based on CE findings. CONCLUSIONS: In clinical practice, CE was most commonly indicated for the initial diagnosis of CD and was not generally performed in patients with eCD. CE appears to be an effective diagnostic modality for evaluating sCD and is useful for determining therapeutic strategies for patients with sCD and those with eCD.


Subject(s)
Capsule Endoscopy , Crohn Disease , Diagnosis , Enteritis , Humans , Korea , Medical Records , Retrospective Studies
8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-61973

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: The post-reflux swallow-induced peristaltic wave (PSPW) index and esophageal baseline impedance (BI) are novel impedance parameters used to evaluate esophageal chemical clearance and mucosal integrity. However, their relationship with reflux symptoms is not known. We aim to evaluate the correlations of PSPW index and esophageal BI with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH (MII-pH) tracings in patients with suspected GERD. Reflux symptoms were also analyzed from checklists using ordinal scales. The PSPW index and esophageal BIs in 6 spots (z1–z6) were measured. Bivariate (Spearman) correlation was used to analyze the relationship between the PSPW index or esophageal BI, and the degree of GERD symptoms measured. RESULTS: The MII-pH records of 143 patients were analyzed. The PSPW index was significantly lower in patients who had heartburn and negatively correlated with the degree of heartburn (r = −0.186, P < 0.05). On the contrary, the PSPW index was not significantly correlated with the degree of dysphagia (r = −0.013, P = 0.874). Distal esophageal BI was not significantly correlated with heartburn, but negatively correlated with the degree of dysphagia (z3: r = −0.328, z4: r = −0.361, z5: r = −0.316, z6: r = −0.273; P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that delayed chemical clearance of the esophagus may induce heartburn, but that it is not related to dysphagia. However, a lack of esophageal mucosal integrity may be related to dysphagia.


Subject(s)
Checklist , Deglutition Disorders , Electric Impedance , Esophagus , Gastroesophageal Reflux , Heartburn , Humans , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Retrospective Studies , Weights and Measures
9.
Gut and Liver ; : 253-260, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-69994

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: In some cases, chronic diarrhea is unexplained, and small bowel disorders may be one of the causes. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic yield and clinical impact of video capsule endoscopy (VCE) in patients with chronic diarrhea. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed records from October 2002 to August 2013 in the VCE nationwide database registry (n=2,964). Ninety-one patients from 15 medical centers (60 males and 31 females; mean age, 47±19 years) were evaluated for VCE as a result of chronic diarrhea. RESULTS: The duration of chronic diarrhea was 8.3±14.7 months. The positive diagnostic yield of VCE was 42.9% (39/91). However, 15.4% (14/91) exhibited an inconsistent result, and 41.8% (38/91) were negative. Abnormal findings consistent with chronic diarrhea included erosions/aphthous ulcers (19.8%), ulcers (17.6%), mucosal erythema (3.3%), edema (1.1%), and luminal narrowing (1.1%). The most common diagnoses were functional diarrhea associated with irritable bowel syndrome in 37 patients (40.7%) and Crohn’s disease in 18 patients (19.8%). After VCE examination, the diagnosis was changed in 34.1% of the patients (31/91). Hematochezia (odds ratio [OR], 8.802; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.126 to 36.441) and hypoalbuminemia (OR, 4.811; 95% CI, 1.241 to 18.655) are predictive factors of a positive diagnostic yield. CONCLUSIONS: VCE had a favorable diagnostic yield and clinical impact on the management of patients with chronic diarrhea.


Subject(s)
Capsule Endoscopy , Diagnosis , Diarrhea , Edema , Erythema , Female , Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage , Humans , Hypoalbuminemia , Irritable Bowel Syndrome , Male , Phenobarbital , Retrospective Studies , Ulcer
10.
Gut and Liver ; : 821-827, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-82305

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: The adoption of colonoscopy as a primary colorectal cancer (CRC) screening technique has been argued for in Korea, without evidence of patient preferences. This study aimed to investigate patients’ preferences for the primary CRC screening test for the National Cancer Screening Program (NCSP). METHODS: Between June and August 2016, 414 individuals aged ≥50 years who participated in the NCSP were prospectively invited to complete a questionnaire regarding their preferences for the primary CRC screening test and the reasons for their selection. RESULTS: Among the 396 respondents who completed the questionnaire, 124 individuals (31.3%) preferred the fecal immunochemical test (FIT), whereas 272 individuals (68.7%) preferred colonoscopy. Elderly participants preferred the FIT (p < 0.001), whereas participants with a higher education level (p=0.030), a higher income level (p=0.009), or individuals with a family member (p=0.028) or acquaintance (p=0.013) with a history of CRC preferred colonoscopy. Only 12.9% of participants had a bad experience with a previous FIT; however, 39.3% of participants had a bad experience with a previous colonoscopy. CONCLUSIONS: Colonoscopy was preferred to FIT in a 2.2:1 ratio as the primary CRC screening test for the NCSP. Patients’ preference for colonoscopy should be considered for the NCSP in Korea.


Subject(s)
Aged , Colonoscopy , Colorectal Neoplasms , Early Detection of Cancer , Education , Humans , Korea , Mass Screening , Patient Preference , Prospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 542-547, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-209985

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: In Korea, the nationwide gastric cancer screening program recommends biennial screening for individuals aged 40 years or older by way of either an upper gastrointestinal series or endoscopy. The national endoscopic quality assessment (QA) program began recommending endoscopy in medical institutions in 2009. We aimed to assess the effect, burden, and cost of the QA program from the viewpoint of medical institutions. METHODS: We surveyed the staff of institutional endoscopic units via e-mail. RESULTS: Staff members from 67 institutions replied. Most doctors were endoscopic specialists. They responded as to whether the QA program raised awareness for endoscopic quality (93%) or improved endoscopic practice (40%). The percentages of responders who reported improvements in the diagnosis of gastric cancer, the qualifications of endoscopists, the quality of facilities and equipment, endoscopic procedure, and endoscopic reprocessing were 69%, 60%, 66%, 82%, and 75%, respectively. Regarding reprocessing, many staff members reported that they had bought new automated endoscopic preprocessors (3%), used more disinfectants (34%), washed endoscopes longer (28%), reduced the number of endoscopies performed to adhere to reprocessing guidelines (9%), and created their own quality education programs (59%). Many responders said they felt that QA was associated with some degree of burden (48%), especially financial burden caused by purchasing new equipment. Reasonable quality standards (45%) and incentives (38%) were considered important to the success of the QA program. CONCLUSIONS: Endoscopic quality has improved after 5 years of the mandatory endoscopic QA program.


Subject(s)
Diagnosis , Disinfectants , Education , Electronic Mail , Endoscopes , Endoscopy , Korea , Mass Screening , Motivation , Specialization , Stomach Neoplasms
12.
Gut and Liver ; : 699-705, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-166359

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: We evaluated the characteristics of the National Cancer Screening Program (NCSP) and opinions regarding the National Endoscopy Quality Improvement Program (NEQIP). METHODS: We surveyed physicians performing esophagogastroduodenoscopy and/or colonoscopy screenings as part of the NCSP via e-mail between July and August in 2015. The 32-item survey instrument included endoscopic capacity, sedation, and reprocessing of endoscopes as well as opinions regarding the NEQIP. RESULTS: A total of 507 respondents were analyzed after the exclusion of 40 incomplete answers. Under the current capacity of the NCSP, the typical waiting time for screening endoscopy was less than 4 weeks in more than 90% of endoscopy units. Performance of endoscopy reprocessing was suboptimal, with 28% of respondents using unapproved disinfectants or not knowing the main ingredient of their disinfectants and 15% to 17% of respondents not following reprocessing protocols. Agreement with the NEQIP was optimal, because only 5.7% of respondents did not agree with NEQIP; however, familiarity with the NEQIP was suboptimal, because only 37.3% of respondents were familiar with the NEQIP criteria. CONCLUSIONS: The NEQ-IP remains suboptimal in Korea. Given the suboptimal performance of endoscopy reprocessing and low familiarity with the NEQIP, improved quality in endoscopy reprocessing and better understanding of the NEQIP should be emphasized in Korea.


Subject(s)
Colonoscopy , Colorectal Neoplasms , Disinfectants , Early Detection of Cancer , Electronic Mail , Endoscopes , Endoscopy , Endoscopy, Digestive System , Korea , Mass Screening , Quality Improvement , Recognition, Psychology , Stomach Neoplasms , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
Gut and Liver ; : 623-628, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-216108

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Currently, the videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) is the standard tool for evaluating dysphagia. We evaluated whether the addition of endoscopist-directed flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) to VFSS could improve the detection rates of penetration, aspiration, and pharyngeal residue, compared the diagnostic efficacy between VFSS and endoscopist-directed FEES and assessed the adverse events of the FEES. METHODS: In single tertiary referral center, a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data was conducted. Fifty consecutive patients suspected of oropharyngeal dysphagia were enrolled in this study between January 2012 and July 2012. RESULTS: The agreement in the detection of penetration and aspiration between VFSS and FEES of viscous food (kappa=0.34; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.15 to 0.53) and liquid food (kappa=0.22; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.42) was "fair." The agreement in the detection of pharyngeal residue between the two tests was "substantial" with viscous food (kappa=0.63; 95% CI, 0.41 to 0.94) and "fair" with liquid food (kappa=0.37; 95% CI, 0.10 to 0.63). Adding FEES to VFSS significantly increased the detection rates of penetration, aspiration, and pharyngeal residue. No severe adverse events were noted during FEES, except for two cases of epistaxis, which stopped spontaneously without requiring any packing. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that the addition of endoscopist-directed FEES to VFSS increased the detection rates of penetration, aspiration, and pharyngeal residue.


Subject(s)
Aged , Deglutition/physiology , Deglutition Disorders/diagnosis , Female , Fluoroscopy/methods , Humans , Laryngoscopy/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Pharynx/diagnostic imaging , Reproducibility of Results , Retrospective Studies , Video Recording
14.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 178-180, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-203521

ABSTRACT

"Cat scratch colon" is a gross finding characterized by hemorrhagic mucosal scratches on colonoscopy. It is usually associated with a normal colon and is rarely associated with collagenous colitis. In a previous report, cat scratch colon was noted in the cecum and ascending colon, but has also been observed in the distal transverse colon. The patient in this study was also diagnosed with ischemic colitis that may have played a role in the development of cat scratch colon.


Subject(s)
Animals , Barotrauma , Cats , Cecum , Colitis , Colitis, Collagenous , Colitis, Ischemic , Colon , Colon, Ascending , Colon, Transverse , Colonoscopy , Humans , Ischemia
15.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 399-404, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-170083

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Capsule endoscopy (CE) is widely used. However, CE has limitations including incomplete examination, inadequate bowel preparation, and retention. The aim of this study was to estimate the indications for and detection, completion, and retention rates of small intestine CE based on the 10-year data from the Korean Capsule Endoscopy Registry. METHODS: Twenty-four hospitals participated in this study. Clinical information, such as reasons for CE, method and quality of bowel preparation, and incomplete examination and capsule retention rates, was collected and analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 2,914 CEs were registered. The most common reason for CE was obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (59%). Significant lesions were detected in 66% of cases. Positive CE diagnosis occurred in 63% of cases. The preparation method did not significantly affect the quality of bowel preparation for CE. The overall incomplete rate was 33%, and was high in the elderly and those with poor bowel preparation. Capsule retention was 3% and high in patients with small bowel tumors and Crohn's disease and in children under 10 years of age. CONCLUSIONS: CE is a valuable technique; while the overall detection rate is high, incompletion and retention rates are also relatively high. CE should be carefully considered in the elderly and children less than 10 years of age, as well as in patients with small bowel tumors and Crohn's disease.


Subject(s)
Aged , Capsule Endoscopy , Child , Crohn Disease , Diagnosis , Hemorrhage , Humans , Intestine, Small
16.
Gut and Liver ; : 494-501, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-149100

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: We investigated whether sodium picosulfate with magnesium citrate (SPMC) plus bisacodyl compares favorably with conventional polyethylene glycol (PEG) with respect to bowel cleansing adequacy, compliance, and safety. METHODS: We performed a multicenter, prospective, single-blinded study in outpatients undergoing daytime colonoscopies. Patients were randomized into a split preparation SPMC/bisacodyl group and a conventional split PEG group. We compared preparation adequacy using the Boston bowel preparation scale (BBPS), ease of use using a modified Likert scale (LS), compliance/satisfaction level using a visual analogue scale (VAS), and safety by monitoring adverse events during the colonoscopy between the two groups. RESULTS: A total of 365 patients were evaluated by intention to treat (ITT) analysis, and 319 were evaluated by per protocol (PP) population analysis (153 for SPMC/bisacodyl, 166 for PEG). The mean total BBPS score was not different between the two groups in both the ITT and PP analyses (p>0.05). The mean VAS score for satisfaction and LS score for the ease of use were higher in the SPMC/bisacodyl group (p<0.001). The adverse event rate was lower in the SPMC/bisacodyl group than in the PEG group (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The SPMC/bisacodyl treatment was comparable to conventional PEG with respect to bowel preparation adequacy and superior with respect to compliance, satisfaction, and safety.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Cathartics/administration & dosage , Citrates/administration & dosage , Citric Acid/administration & dosage , Colon/drug effects , Colonoscopy , Drug Combinations , Drug Therapy, Combination/methods , Female , Humans , Intention to Treat Analysis , Laxatives/administration & dosage , Male , Middle Aged , Organometallic Compounds/administration & dosage , Patient Compliance , Patient Satisfaction , Picolines/administration & dosage , Polyethylene Glycols/administration & dosage , Preoperative Care/methods , Single-Blind Method , Young Adult
17.
Gut and Liver ; : 727-733, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-67333

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: We evaluated the long-term outcome and clinical course of patients of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced small intestinal injury by performing capsule endoscopy (CE). METHODS: A multicenter retrospective study was conducted using data collected from the CE nationwide database registry, which has been established since 2002. RESULTS: A total of 140 patients (87 males; mean age, 60.6+/-14.8 years) from the CE nationwide database registry (n=2,885) were diagnosed with NSAID-induced small intestinal injury and enrolled in our study. Forty-nine patients (35.0%) presented with a history of aspirin use and an additional 49 (35.0%) were taking NSAIDs without aspirin. The most prominent findings after performing CE were multiple ulcerations (n=82, 58.6%) and erosions or aphthae (n=32, 22.9%). During the follow-up period (mean, 15.9+/-19.0 months; range, 0 to 106 months), NSAID-induced small intestinal injury only recurred in six patients (4.3%). Older age and hypertension were positive predictive factors for recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that the recurrence of NSAID-induced small bowel injury was not frequent in the presence of conservative treatment. Therefore, the initial diagnosis using CE and the medication history are important.


Subject(s)
Age Factors , Aged , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/adverse effects , Aspirin/adverse effects , Capsule Endoscopy , Female , Humans , Intestinal Diseases/chemically induced , Intestine, Small/drug effects , Male , Middle Aged , Recurrence , Republic of Korea , Retrospective Studies , Time Factors , Ulcer/chemically induced
18.
Intestinal Research ; : 313-317, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-50553

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Pneumoperitoneum is recognized as a benign and self-limiting finding after the insertion of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube, while complicated pneumoperitoneum is rarely reported. The aim of this study was to reappraise pneumoperitoneum following PEG. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 193 patients who underwent PEG from May 2008 to May 2014. All patients had a follow-up upright chest or simple abdominal radiograph after PEG. Pneumoperitoneum was quantified by measuring the height of the air column under the diaphragm and graded as small (4 cm). Clinically significant signs were defined as fever, abdominal tenderness or leukocytosis occurring after PEG insertion. RESULTS: Of the 193 study patients, 9 (4.6%) had a pneumoperitoneum visualized by radiographic imaging, graded as small in 5 patients, moderate in 2 patients and large in 2 patients. Clinically significant signs were observed in 5 (55.5%) patients with fever reported in 4 patients, abdominal tenderness in 4 patients and leukocytosis in 4 patients. The time to resolution of free air was 2-18 days. Two patients (22.2%) with moderate or large pneumoperitoneum after PEG died from either pneumonia or septic shock. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical course of pneumoperitoneum after PEG is not always benign and self-limiting. These findings suggest that clinicians should not neglect a moderate or large pneumoperitoneum, particularly in patients who have an altered mental status or received antibiotics, since peritoneal irritation cannot be observed under these circumstances.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents , Diaphragm , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal , Fever , Follow-Up Studies , Gastrostomy , Humans , Leukocytosis , Pneumonia , Pneumoperitoneum , Retrospective Studies , Shock, Septic , Thorax
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-14527

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: To date, high-resolution manometry has been used mainly in the study of esophageal motility disorders and has been shown to provide more physiological information than conventional manometry, and is easier to interpret. This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of high-resolution anorectal manometry (HRARM) compared to water-perfused anorectal manometry. METHODS: Patients who complained of chronic constipation with/without fecal incontinence underwent both water-perfused anorectal manometry and HRARM in a random order on the same day. Resting and squeezing pressures of the anal sphincter, attempted defecation, rectoanal inhibitory reflex, rectoanal contractile reflex, Rao's type of dyssynergia during attempted defecation, anal canal length, defecation dynamic parameters and measurement times for each method were analyzed. RESULTS: Of 14 patients, 7 were female, and the median age was 59 years (range 35-77). Indications for manometry were constipation (n = 8) and constipation with fecal incontinence (n = 6). Resting and squeezing pressures showed that the 2 methods were strongly correlated (resting pressure: r = 0.746, P = 0.002; squeezing pressure: r = 0.921, P < 0.001). In attempted defection, one equivocal case with water-perfused anorectal manometry was diagnosed type I pelvic floor dyssynergia with HRARM providing detailed pressure changes in internal and external anal spincters, and puborectalis muscle which improved assessment of anorectal disorders. The measurement time for HRARM was significantly shorter than that for water-perfused anorectal manometry (11.3 vs 23.0 minutes, P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Both water-perfused anorectal manometry and HRARM are well tolerated and reliable methods of evaluating defecation disorders of pelvic floor dysfunction. HRARM is likely to provide better physiological information and to require a shorter measurement time compared to water-perfused anorectal manometry.


Subject(s)
Anal Canal , Ataxia , Constipation , Defecation , Esophageal Motility Disorders , Fecal Incontinence , Female , Humans , Manometry , Pelvic Floor , Reflex
20.
Intestinal Research ; : 139-145, 2014.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-121984

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops from colonic adenomas. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with a higher risk of CRC and metformin decreases CRC risk. However, it is not certain if metformin affects the development of colorectal polyps and adenomas. This study aimed to elucidate if metforminaffects the incidence of colonic polyps and adenomas in patients with type 2 DM. METHODS: Of 12,186 patients with type 2 DM, 3,775 underwent colonoscopy between May 2001 and March 2013. This study enrolled 3,105 of these patients, and divided them in two groups: 912 patients with metformin use and 2,193 patients without metformin use. Patient clinical characteristics, polyp and adenoma detection rate in the two groups were analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS: The Colorectal polyp detection rate was lower in the metformin group than in the non-meformin group (39.4% vs. 62.4%, P<0.01). Colorectal adenoma detection rate was significantly lower in the metformin group than in the non-metformin group (15.2% vs. 20.5%, P<0.01). Fewer advanced adenomas were detected in the metformin group than in the non-metformin group (12.2% vs. 22%, P<0.01). Multivariate analysis identified age, sex, Body mass index and metformin use as factors associated with polyp incidence, whereas only metforminwas independently associated with decreased adenoma incidence (Odd ratio=0.738, 95% CI=0.554-0.983, P=0.03). CONCLUSIONS: In patients with type 2 DM, metformin reduced the incidence of adenomas that may transform into CRC. Therefore, metformin may be useful for the prevention of CRC in patients with type 2 DM.


Subject(s)
Adenoma , Body Mass Index , Colon , Colonic Polyps , Colonoscopy , Colorectal Neoplasms , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Humans , Incidence , Metformin , Multivariate Analysis , Polyps , Retrospective Studies
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