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1.
Gut and Liver ; : 354-374, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-898451

ABSTRACT

Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided tissue acquisition of pancreatic solid tumor requires a strict recommendation for its proper use in clinical practice because of its technical difficulty and invasiveness. The Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (KSGE) appointed a task force to draft clinical practice guidelines for EUS-guided tissue acquisition of pancreatic solid tumor. The strength of recommendation and the level of evidence for each statement were graded according to the Minds Handbook for Clinical Practice Guideline Development 2014. The committee, comprising a development panel of 16 endosonographers and an expert on guideline development methodology, developed 12 evidence-based recommendations in eight categories intended to help physicians make evidence-based clinical judgments with regard to the diagnosis of pancreatic solid tumor. This clinical practice guideline discusses EUS-guided sampling in pancreatic solid tumor and makes recommendations on circumstances that warrant its use, technical issues related to maximizing the diagnostic yield (e.g., needle type, needle diameter, adequate number of needle passes, sample obtaining techniques, and methods of specimen processing), adverse events of EUS-guided tissue acquisition, and learning-related issues. This guideline was reviewed by external experts and suggests best practices recommended based on the evidence available at the time of preparation. This guideline may not be applicable for all clinical situations and should be interpreted in light of specific situations and the availability of resources. It will be revised as necessary to cover progress and changes in technology and evidence from clinical practice.

2.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 161-181, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-897748

ABSTRACT

Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided tissue acquisition of pancreatic solid tumor requires a strict recommendation for its proper use in clinical practice because of its technical difficulty and invasiveness. The Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (KSGE) appointed a Task Force to draft clinical practice guidelines for EUS-guided tissue acquisition of pancreatic solid tumor. The strength of recommendation and the level of evidence for each statement were graded according to the Minds Handbook for Clinical Practice Guideline Development 2014. The committee, comprising a development panel of 16 endosonographers and an expert on guideline development methodology, developed 12 evidence-based recommendations in 8 categories intended to help physicians make evidence-based clinical judgments with regard to the diagnosis of pancreatic solid tumor. This clinical practice guideline discusses EUS-guided sampling in pancreatic solid tumor and makes recommendations on circumstances that warrant its use, technical issues related to maximizing the diagnostic yield (e.g., needle type, needle diameter, adequate number of needle passes, sample obtaining techniques, and methods of specimen processing), adverse events of EUS-guided tissue acquisition, and learning-related issues. This guideline was reviewed by external experts and suggests best practices recommended based on the evidence available at the time of preparation. This guideline may not be applicable for all clinical situations and should be interpreted in light of specific situations and the availability of resources. It will be revised as necessary to cover progress and changes in technology and evidence from clinical practice.

3.
The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology ; : 73-93, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-903564

ABSTRACT

Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided tissue acquisition of pancreatic solid tumor requires a strict recommendation for its proper use in clinical practice because of its technical difficulty and invasiveness. The Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy appointed a Task Force to draft clinical practice guidelines for EUS-guided tissue acquisition of pancreatic solid tumor. The strength of recommendation and the level of evidence for each statement were graded according to the Minds Handbook for Clinical Practice Guideline Development 2014. The committee, comprising a development panel of 16 endosonographers and an expert on guideline development methodology, developed 12 evidence-based recommendations in eight categories intended to help physicians make evidence-based clinical judgments with regard to the diagnosis of pancreatic solid tumor. This clinical practice guideline discusses EUS-guided sampling in pancreatic solid tumor and makes recommendations on circumstances that warrant its use, technical issues related to maximizing the diagnostic yield (e.g., needle type, needle diameter, adequate number of needle passes, sample obtaining techniques, and methods of specimen processing), adverse events of EUS-guided tissue acquisition, and learning-related issues.This guideline was reviewed by external experts and suggests best practices recommended based on the evidence available at the time of preparation. This guideline may not be applicable for all clinical situations and should be interpreted in light of specific situations and the availability of resources. It will be revised as necessary to cover progress and changes in technology and evidence from clinical practice

4.
Korean Journal of Pancreas and Biliary Tract ; : 125-147, 2021.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-902372

ABSTRACT

Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided tissue acquisition of pancreatic solid tumor requires a strict recommendation for its proper use in clinical practice because of its technical difficulty and invasiveness. The Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy appointed a Task Force to draft clinical practice guidelines for EUS-guided tissue acquisition of pancreatic solid tumor. The strength of recommendation and the level of evidence for each statement were graded according to the Minds Handbook for Clinical Practice Guideline Development 2014. The committee, comprising a development panel of 16 endosonographers and an expert on guideline development methodology, developed 12 evidence-based recommendations in eight categories intended to help physicians make evidence-based clinical judgments with regard to the diagnosis of pancreatic solid tumor. This clinical practice guideline discusses EUS-guided sampling in pancreatic solid tumor and makes recommendations on circumstances that warrant its use, technical issues related to maximizing the diagnostic yield (e.g., needle type, needle diameter, adequate number of needle passes, sample obtaining techniques, and methods of specimen processing), adverse events of EUS-guided tissue acquisition, and learning-related issues. This guideline was reviewed by external experts and suggests best practices recommended based on the evidence available at the time of preparation. This guideline may not be applicable for all clinical situations and should be interpreted in light of specific situations and the availability of resources. It will be revised as necessary to cover progress and changes in technology and evidence from clinical practice.

5.
The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology ; : 73-93, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-895860

ABSTRACT

Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided tissue acquisition of pancreatic solid tumor requires a strict recommendation for its proper use in clinical practice because of its technical difficulty and invasiveness. The Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy appointed a Task Force to draft clinical practice guidelines for EUS-guided tissue acquisition of pancreatic solid tumor. The strength of recommendation and the level of evidence for each statement were graded according to the Minds Handbook for Clinical Practice Guideline Development 2014. The committee, comprising a development panel of 16 endosonographers and an expert on guideline development methodology, developed 12 evidence-based recommendations in eight categories intended to help physicians make evidence-based clinical judgments with regard to the diagnosis of pancreatic solid tumor. This clinical practice guideline discusses EUS-guided sampling in pancreatic solid tumor and makes recommendations on circumstances that warrant its use, technical issues related to maximizing the diagnostic yield (e.g., needle type, needle diameter, adequate number of needle passes, sample obtaining techniques, and methods of specimen processing), adverse events of EUS-guided tissue acquisition, and learning-related issues.This guideline was reviewed by external experts and suggests best practices recommended based on the evidence available at the time of preparation. This guideline may not be applicable for all clinical situations and should be interpreted in light of specific situations and the availability of resources. It will be revised as necessary to cover progress and changes in technology and evidence from clinical practice

6.
Korean Journal of Pancreas and Biliary Tract ; : 125-147, 2021.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-894668

ABSTRACT

Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided tissue acquisition of pancreatic solid tumor requires a strict recommendation for its proper use in clinical practice because of its technical difficulty and invasiveness. The Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy appointed a Task Force to draft clinical practice guidelines for EUS-guided tissue acquisition of pancreatic solid tumor. The strength of recommendation and the level of evidence for each statement were graded according to the Minds Handbook for Clinical Practice Guideline Development 2014. The committee, comprising a development panel of 16 endosonographers and an expert on guideline development methodology, developed 12 evidence-based recommendations in eight categories intended to help physicians make evidence-based clinical judgments with regard to the diagnosis of pancreatic solid tumor. This clinical practice guideline discusses EUS-guided sampling in pancreatic solid tumor and makes recommendations on circumstances that warrant its use, technical issues related to maximizing the diagnostic yield (e.g., needle type, needle diameter, adequate number of needle passes, sample obtaining techniques, and methods of specimen processing), adverse events of EUS-guided tissue acquisition, and learning-related issues. This guideline was reviewed by external experts and suggests best practices recommended based on the evidence available at the time of preparation. This guideline may not be applicable for all clinical situations and should be interpreted in light of specific situations and the availability of resources. It will be revised as necessary to cover progress and changes in technology and evidence from clinical practice.

7.
Gut and Liver ; : 354-374, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-890747

ABSTRACT

Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided tissue acquisition of pancreatic solid tumor requires a strict recommendation for its proper use in clinical practice because of its technical difficulty and invasiveness. The Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (KSGE) appointed a task force to draft clinical practice guidelines for EUS-guided tissue acquisition of pancreatic solid tumor. The strength of recommendation and the level of evidence for each statement were graded according to the Minds Handbook for Clinical Practice Guideline Development 2014. The committee, comprising a development panel of 16 endosonographers and an expert on guideline development methodology, developed 12 evidence-based recommendations in eight categories intended to help physicians make evidence-based clinical judgments with regard to the diagnosis of pancreatic solid tumor. This clinical practice guideline discusses EUS-guided sampling in pancreatic solid tumor and makes recommendations on circumstances that warrant its use, technical issues related to maximizing the diagnostic yield (e.g., needle type, needle diameter, adequate number of needle passes, sample obtaining techniques, and methods of specimen processing), adverse events of EUS-guided tissue acquisition, and learning-related issues. This guideline was reviewed by external experts and suggests best practices recommended based on the evidence available at the time of preparation. This guideline may not be applicable for all clinical situations and should be interpreted in light of specific situations and the availability of resources. It will be revised as necessary to cover progress and changes in technology and evidence from clinical practice.

8.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 161-181, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-890044

ABSTRACT

Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided tissue acquisition of pancreatic solid tumor requires a strict recommendation for its proper use in clinical practice because of its technical difficulty and invasiveness. The Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (KSGE) appointed a Task Force to draft clinical practice guidelines for EUS-guided tissue acquisition of pancreatic solid tumor. The strength of recommendation and the level of evidence for each statement were graded according to the Minds Handbook for Clinical Practice Guideline Development 2014. The committee, comprising a development panel of 16 endosonographers and an expert on guideline development methodology, developed 12 evidence-based recommendations in 8 categories intended to help physicians make evidence-based clinical judgments with regard to the diagnosis of pancreatic solid tumor. This clinical practice guideline discusses EUS-guided sampling in pancreatic solid tumor and makes recommendations on circumstances that warrant its use, technical issues related to maximizing the diagnostic yield (e.g., needle type, needle diameter, adequate number of needle passes, sample obtaining techniques, and methods of specimen processing), adverse events of EUS-guided tissue acquisition, and learning-related issues. This guideline was reviewed by external experts and suggests best practices recommended based on the evidence available at the time of preparation. This guideline may not be applicable for all clinical situations and should be interpreted in light of specific situations and the availability of resources. It will be revised as necessary to cover progress and changes in technology and evidence from clinical practice.

9.
The Korean Journal of Parasitology ; : 283-290, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-761741

ABSTRACT

A rapid diagnostic test (RDT) kit was developed to detect non-structural protein 1 (NS1) of yellow fever virus (YFV) using monoclonal antibody. NS1 protein was purified from the cultured YFV and used to immunize mice. Monoclonal antibody to NS1 was selected and conjugated with colloidal gold to produce the YFV NS1 RDT kit. The YFV RDTs were evaluated for sensitivity and specificity using positive and negative samples of monkeys from Brazil and negative human blood samples from Korea. Among monoclonal antibodies, clones 3A11 and 3B7 proved most sensitive, and used for YFV RDT kit. Diagnostic accuracy of YFV RDT was fairly high; Sensitivity was 0.0% and specificity was 100% against Dengue viruses type 2 and 3, Zika, Chikungunya and Mayaro viruses. This YFV RDT kit could be employed as a test of choice for point-of-care diagnosis and large scale surveys of YFV infection under clinical or field conditions in endemic areas and on the globe.


Subject(s)
Animals , Humans , Mice , Antibodies, Monoclonal , Brazil , Clone Cells , Dengue Virus , Diagnosis , Diagnostic Tests, Routine , Gold Colloid , Haplorhini , Korea , Point-of-Care Systems , Sensitivity and Specificity , Yellow fever virus , Yellow Fever
10.
Korean Journal of Pediatrics ; : S60-S63, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-201860

ABSTRACT

Herein, we report a rare case of hemolytic anemia with reticulocytopenia following intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in a young infant treated for Kawasaki disease. A 2-month-old boy presented with fever lasting 3 days, conjunctival injection, strawberry tongue, erythematous edema of the hands, and macular rash, symptoms and signs suggestive of incomplete Kawasaki disease. His fever resolved 8 days after treatment with aspirin and high dose infusion of intravenous immunoglobulin. The hemoglobin and hematocrit decreased from 9.7 g/dL and 27.1% to 7.4 g/dL and 21.3%, respectively. The patient had normocytic hypochromic anemia with anisocytosis, poikilocytosis, immature neutrophils, and nucleated red blood cells. The direct antiglobulin test result was positive, and the reticulocyte count was 1.39%. The patient had an uneventful recovery. However, reticulocytopenia persisted 1 month after discharge.


Subject(s)
Humans , Infant , Male , Anemia , Anemia, Hemolytic , Anemia, Hypochromic , Aspirin , Coombs Test , Edema , Erythrocytes , Exanthema , Fever , Fragaria , Hand , Hematocrit , Hemolysis , Immunization, Passive , Immunoglobulins , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome , Neutrophils , Reticulocyte Count , Reticulocytes , Tongue
11.
Korean Journal of Anesthesiology ; : 419-424, 2012.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-227541

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study was designed to assess the effects of pneumoperitoneal pressure (PP) and positional changes on the respiratory mechanics during laparoscopy assisted colectomy. METHODS: Peak inspiratory pressure, plateau pressure, lung compliance, and airway resistance were recorded in PP of 10 mmHg and 15 mmHg, with the position change in 5 steps: head-down at 20degrees, head-down at 10degrees, neutral position, head-up at 10degrees and head-up at 20degrees. RESULTS: When the patient was placed head-down, the position change accentuated the effects of pneumoperitoneum on respiratory mechanics. However, when the patient was placed in a head-up position during pneumoperitoneum the results showed no pattern. In the 20degrees head-up position with the PP being 10 mmHg, the compliance increased from 30.6 to 32.6 ml/cmH2O compared with neutral position (P = 0.002). However with the PP being 15 mmHg, the compliance had not changed compared with neutral position (P = 0.989). In 20degrees head-down position with the PP of 10 mmHg, the compliance was measured as 24.2 ml/cmH2O. This was higher than that for patients in the 10degrees head-down position with a PP of 15 mmHg, which was recorded as 21.2 ml/cmH2O. Also in the airway resistance, the patient in the 20degrees head-down position with the PP of 10 mmHg showed 15.8 cmH2O/L/sec, while the patient in the 10degrees head-down position with the PP of 15 mmHg showed 16.2 cmH2O/L/sec of airway resistance. These results were not statistically significant but still suggested that the head-down position accentuated the effects of pneumoperitoneum on respiratory mechanics. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that respiratory mechanics are affected by the patient position and the level of PP - the latter having greater effect.


Subject(s)
Humans , Airway Resistance , Colectomy , Compliance , Laparoscopy , Lung Compliance , Pneumoperitoneum , Respiratory Mechanics
12.
The Korean Journal of Pain ; : 33-37, 2012.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-59301

ABSTRACT

Thoracic paravertebral block is performed for the treatment of patients with chronic pain, such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and post-herpetic neuralgia. Thoracic paravertebral block can result in iatrogenic pneumothorax. Because pneumothorax can develop into medical emergencies and needle aspiration or chest tube placement may be needed, early diagnosis is very important. Recently, thoracic ultrasonography has begun to be used to diagnose pneumothorax. In addition, ultrasound-guided aspiration can be an accurate and safe technique for treatment of pneumothorax, as the needle position can be followed in real time. We report a case of iatrogenic pneumothorax following thoracic paravertebral block for the treatment of chronic pain due to CRPS, treated successfully by ultrasound-guided aspiration.


Subject(s)
Humans , Chest Tubes , Chronic Pain , Early Diagnosis , Emergencies , Needles , Neuralgia , Pneumothorax
13.
Anesthesia and Pain Medicine ; : 16-20, 2011.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-192500

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lumbar epidural block is a common regional anesthetic/analgesic technique. The depth of the epidural space beneath the skin surface varies from patient to patient at the same vertebral level. It also varies at different levels of the spinal column in the same patient. This study was performed to evaluate the correlations between the lumbar epidural depth and physical measurements depending on the puncture site. METHODS: Data was gathered from 1,653 patients who were undergoing elective lumbar epidural blocks for anesthesia during surgical procedures. The age, gender, height and weight were obtained from the medical records. We calculated the physical parameters such as the weight/height ratio, the body mass index (BMI) and Broca's index. Pearson's correlation analysis and regression testing between the lumbar epidural depth and the physical measurements were performed. RESULTS: The epidural depths at the L2-3, L3-4, L4-5 and L5-S1 intervertebral space were 4.4 +/- 0.62, 4.6 +/- 0.69, 4.6 +/- 0.69 and 4.1 +/- 0.52 cm, respectively. A significant correlation was found between the epidural depth and the weight/height ratio and BMI. CONCLUSIONS: The weight/height ratio and BMI showed the highest correlation with the lumbar epidural depth.


Subject(s)
Adult , Humans , Anesthesia , Body Mass Index , Epidural Space , Medical Records , Punctures , Skin , Spine
14.
Korean Journal of Anesthesiology ; : 409-412, 2010.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-11409

ABSTRACT

A 23-year-old woman with MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes) underwent a laparoscopy-assisted appendectomy. MELAS syndrome is a multisystemic disease caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. General anesthesia has several potential hazards to patients with MELAS syndrome, such as malignant hyperthermia, hypothermia, and metabolic acidosis. In this case, anesthesia was performed with propofol, remifentanil TCI, and atracurium without any surgical or anesthetic complications. We discuss the anesthetic effects of MELAS syndrome.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Young Adult , Acidosis , Acidosis, Lactic , Anesthesia , Anesthesia, General , Anesthesia, Intravenous , Anesthetics , Appendectomy , Atracurium , Hypothermia , Malignant Hyperthermia , MELAS Syndrome , Muscular Diseases , Piperidines , Propofol
15.
Journal of the Korean Society of Coloproctology ; : 337-340, 2006.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-175634

ABSTRACT

Crohn's disease is a chronic condition characterized by a non-specific granulomatous necrosis involving potentially any location in the alimentary tract, but a primary lesion confined to the appendix alone is very rare. It is difficult to discriminate Crohn's appendicitis from acute appendicitis preoperatively because of their clinical similarities. Because Crohn's disease confined to the appendix has a more favorable prognosis than typical Crohn's disease, it is considered a separate disease from Crohn's disease. Recently, the term idiopathic granulomatous appendicitis has gained wide acceptance as a distinct disease entity. We experienced a case of Crohn's disease giving rise to appendicitis or idiopathic granulomatous appendicitis and report a case with a review of the literature.


Subject(s)
Appendicitis , Appendix , Crohn Disease , Necrosis , Prognosis
16.
The Korean Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery ; : 866-870, 1993.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-153322

ABSTRACT

No abstract available.


Subject(s)
Pneumothorax
17.
The Korean Journal of Parasitology ; : 69-82, 1987.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-99691

ABSTRACT

The prevalences of the fluke belonging to genus Metagonimus have been reported along the upper stream of inhabitants by several workers since 1980, however the taxonomical problems of the fluke was not yet settled. The larval flukes; cercaria and metacercaria as well as their intermediate hosts, and adult were studied in order to identify the Metagonimus in the areas. The results obtained are summarized as follows: The snails, Semisulcospira globus were collected from the three different localities along the upper stream of the River. The cercariae were found from 125(7.2%) out of 1,730 snails by natural emerging method, and were identified into 5 species including Metagonimus sp. (3.7%), Pseudexorchis major(1.4%), Cercaria nipponensis (0.9), Cercaria incerta (0.6%) and Cercaria yoshidae(0.6%). Cercariae of Metagonimus species had four to five oral spines on its anterior of the first line. The cercariae of Metagonimus were experimentally exposed to goldfish. Infection rate was 22.9% out of 105 goldfish, and the encysted metacercariae were found in fins(86.7%) and on scales (13.7%) of the fishes, but not in their muscle, head or visceral organs. Seven species of fish were caught in the Daecheong reservoir and the upper stream. Infestations with metacercaria of Metagonimus were found 100% in Opsariichtys bidens and the parasitized numbers of the metacercariae were observed from 250 to 2,400 per fish. In the upper stream, Zacco temmincki, Z. platypus and Pseudogobio esocinus were infected 100% with the metacercaria, on the other hand, the fishes caught in the reservoir showed the lower infestation rates, and a few metacercariae found in the fishes Carassius carassius and Cyprinus carpio in the reservoir and the stream. The majority of metacercariae was detected only on the scales of fishes. In order to know the infectivity and the distribution patterns in the intestine of hosts, rats and dogs were infected with the metacercariae obtained from O. bidens and Z. platypus. In addition the metacercariae obtained from Z. temmincki, P. esocinus and goldfish were given to the rats. The recovery rates of the worms in the small intestine of dogs were higher (63.3-65.8%) than those of the rats (3.5-31.6%). The flukes were found mostly in the middle and the lower part of small tntestine of the rats and the dogs, but no worm was collected in the upper part of the intestine of rats. The size of adult flukes varied by the hosts. In the adult flukes, oral sucker was smaller than ventral sucker, and the right and left testes were located diagonally, the uterine tubules circled around the upper left testis. The average egg size was 29.1 x 17.7 micro-meter. According to the above results, the flukes belonging to genus Metagonimus distributed along the Geum River was concluded to be identical with Miyata type of M. yokogawai as that Saito had proposed.


Subject(s)
Epidemiology , Cercaria , Metacercariae , Carps , Carps
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