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1.
Blood Research ; : 200-206, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-185278

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CVP) is one of the effective chemotherapeutic regimens for patients with advanced stage marginal zone lymphoma (MZL). However, prognostic factors that affect the outcome of treatment for MZL are not well understood. METHODS: Between August 2006 and June 2013, patients with newly diagnosed stage III and IV MZL treated with R-CVP as a first-line therapy from 15 institutions were retrospectively analyzed. Patients' clinical and laboratory data at diagnosis were collected by review of medical records. RESULTS: A total of 80 patients were analyzed. Bone marrow involvement was observed in 30% cases. Twelve patients (15%) had nodal MZL, and 41.3% patients exhibited multiple mucosa-associated lymphoma tissue sites. Overall response rate was 91.3%, including 73.8% achieving complete response. Advanced MZL patients treated with R-CVP showed a 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) rate of 69.6%. Prognostic markers significantly affecting PFS in univariate analysis were platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR, 3.9 g/dL, P=0.008), and the International Prognostic Index (IPI) score (1 vs. 2–4, P=0.032). In multivariate analysis, only PLR (<95 vs. ≥95, HR 0.367, 95% CI, 0.139–0.971, P=0.043) was an independent risk factor for PFS. CONCLUSION: PLR ≥95 at diagnosis is an independent prognostic marker for PFS in advanced stage MZL patients treated with R-CVP. This marker may aid clinicians in predicting the response to R-CVP chemotherapy in stage III and IV MZL patients.


Subject(s)
Humans , Blood Platelets , Bone Marrow , Cyclophosphamide , Diagnosis , Disease-Free Survival , Drug Therapy , Drug Therapy, Combination , Lymphocytes , Lymphoma , Medical Records , Multivariate Analysis , Prednisone , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Rituximab , Serum Albumin , Vincristine
2.
Annals of Laboratory Medicine ; : 291-299, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-48343

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mutations in calreticulin (CALR) have been reported to be key markers in the molecular diagnosis of myeloid proliferative neoplasms. In most previous reports, CALR mutations were analyzed by using Sanger sequencing. Here, we report a new, rapid, and convenient system for screening CALR mutations without sequencing. METHODS: Eighty-three bone marrow samples were obtained from 81 patients with thrombocytosis. PCR primers were designed to detect wild-type CALR (product: 357 bp) and CALR with type 1 (product: 302 bp) and type 2 mutations (product: 272 bp) in one reaction. The results were confirmed by Sanger sequencing and compared with results from fragment analysis. RESULTS: The minimum detection limit of the screening PCR was 10 ng for type 1, 1 ng for type 2, and 0.1 ng for cases with both mutations. CALR type 1 and type 2 mutants were detected with screening PCR with a maximal analytical sensitivity of 3.2% and <0.8%, respectively. The screening PCR detected 94.1% (16/17) of mutation cases and showed concordant results with sequencing in the cases of type 1 and type 2 mutations. Sanger sequencing identified one novel mutation (c.1123_1132delinsTGC). Compared with sequencing, the screening PCR showed 94.1% sensitivity, 100.0% specificity, 100.0% positive predictive value, and 98.5% negative predictive value. Compared with fragment analysis, the screening PCR presented 88.9% sensitivity and 100.0% specificity. CONCLUSIONS: This screening PCR is a rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective method for the detection of major CALR mutations.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Base Sequence , Bone Marrow/metabolism , Calreticulin/chemistry , DNA Mutational Analysis , Follow-Up Studies , Genotype , Janus Kinase 2/chemistry , Mutation , Myeloproliferative Disorders/complications , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Thrombocytosis/complications
3.
Korean Journal of Medicine ; : 598-603, 2013.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-50201

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Reactivation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been reported in HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive patients undergoing chemotherapy, as well as HBsAg-negative patients with antibodies against HBV core antigen (HBcAg) and/or HBsAg (HBsAb). Chemotherapy-including rituximab-has recently been identified as a predictive factor for HBV reactivation in HBsAg-negative patients with malignant lymphoma. The aim of our study was to identify the factors predictive of HBV reactivation after chemotherapy in patients with malignant lymphoma. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of medical records from patients diagnosed with malignant lymphoma at Gachon University Gil Medical Center in City, County from January 2005 to December 2010. We subsequently determined HBsAg, HBsAb and anti-HBc status in the 196 patients treated with chemotherapy. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 57.3 +/- 14.5 years; 56.3% were male. A total of 172 of 196 (88%) patients in the study population were HBsAg (+) prior to chemotherapy. Three patients (3/11, 27.3%) in the HBsAg (+) group had confirmed HBV reactivation after chemotherapy. In addition, 26 of 196 (13%) patients in the study population tested HBcAg (+) positive prior to chemotherapy. One patient (1/15, 6.7%) in the HBsAg (-)/HBcAb (+) group had confirmed HBV reactivation. In the four patients with HBV reactivation, infection was resolved after treatment with 0.5 mg entecavir or 100 mg lamivudine. CONCLUSIONS: Reactivation of HBV after systemic chemotherapy can occur in HBsAg (-) patients. We recommend that malignant lymphoma patients undergoing chemotherapy be screened for HBV infection status, including HBcAg, and followed closely to prevent HBV reactivation.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Antibodies , Antigens, Surface , Drug Therapy , Hepatitis B Core Antigens , Hepatitis B Surface Antigens , Hepatitis B virus , Hepatitis B , Hepatitis , Lamivudine , Lymphoma , Medical Records , Retrospective Studies
4.
Korean Journal of Blood Transfusion ; : 78-83, 2012.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-76690

ABSTRACT

Antiglobulin test-negative hemolytic anemia, thrombophilia, and marrow failure, such as aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndrome - refractory anemia (MDS-RA), are the primary clinical manifestations of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH). Here, we report on a case of a 56-year-old male patient diagnosed with PNH, MDS-RA, and immune hemolytic anemia (IHA). The patient was transferred to the hospital with an impression of hemolytic anemia and pulmonary embolism. Positive results were observed on direct and indirect antiglobulin tests, and alloantibody, anti-C and anti-e, autoantibodies were identified. In addition, C and e antigens were found in Rh subgrouping. Therefore, due to the presence of autoantibodies against C and e antigens, we assumed that the cause of IHA was autoimmune reaction. Spherocytosis, increased osmotic fragility test, and positivity on direct and indirect antiglobulin tests were not considered characteristics of PNH. Therefore, without the presence of pulmonary embolism and MDS-RA, it is possible that autoimmune hemolytic anemia was considered the only reason for the hemolytic anemia, and that PNH could be overlooked. In patients with PH, use of washed RBCs during transfusion is not necessary. PNH screening test is recommended for patients who have experienced a thromboembolic event and intravascular hemolysis or MDS-RA. In order to obtain accurate information regarding the percentage of GPI-AP-deficient RBCs, flow cytometric analysis should be performed prior to transfusion.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Anemia, Aplastic , Anemia, Hemolytic , Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune , Anemia, Refractory , Autoantibodies , Bone Marrow , Coombs Test , Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal , Hemolysis , Hepatitis B e Antigens , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Mass Screening , Myelodysplastic Syndromes , Osmotic Fragility , Pulmonary Embolism , Thrombophilia
5.
Korean Journal of Hematology ; : 225-228, 2012.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-720322

ABSTRACT

Radioiodine is regularly used in the treatment of thyroid cancer to eliminate residual malignant tissue after thyroidectomy and to treat metastasis. Because of the low dose of radioiodine used to treat thyroid cancer patients, leukemia is an uncommon complication of exposure to radioiodine. Here, we present a patient who developed therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia with inv(16)(p13.1q22);CBFbeta-MYH11, eosinophilia, and K-ras mutation and who had been treated with very low-dose radioiodine following total thyroidectomy.


Subject(s)
Humans , Eosinophilia , Leukemia , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute , Neoplasm Metastasis , Oncogene Proteins, Fusion , Thyroid Gland , Thyroid Neoplasms , Thyroidectomy
6.
Korean Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology ; : 769-775, 2007.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-32487

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the rates and clinical outcomes between abdominal hysterectomy (AH), laparoscopic hysterectomy (LH) and vaginal hysterectomy (VH). METHODS: Medical records of 236 patients who underwent hysterectomy (by one surgeon) for benign uterine pathology between march 2004 and april 2006 were reviewed. Primary outcome measure was the rate of each method of hysterectomy. Secondary outcome measures included perioperative and postoperative outcomes between groups. RESULTS: The mean age, weight, height, body mass index, and parity in three groups showed no difference. In two hundred and twenty two cases of hysterectomies, the rate of AH was 13.5%, LH 34.2%, and VH 52.3%. Perioperative outcomes of AH, LH and VH were as follows : operative time (83.2+/-27.1 min, 94.2+/-25.2 min, and 50.8+/-15.5 min, respectively), change in hemoglobin (2.3+/-1.5 g/dL, 2.0+/-0.9 g/dL, and 1.3+/-1.1 g/dL, respectively), duration of urinary catheterization (2.0+/-0.2 days, 1.0+/-0.0 days, and 1.0+/-0.4 days, respectively), postoperative hospitalization (5.7+/-1.2 days, 4.7+/-0.9 days, and 4.3+/-1.0 days, respectively), uterine weight (733+/-665 g, 340+/-213 g, and 300+/-156 g, respectively). Uterine weight in the AH group was significantly heavier than in the LH and VH. The benefits of LH versus AH were shorter duration of urinary catheterization and postoperative hospitalization (p<0.05). The benefits of VH versus AH were shorter operative time, a smaller drop in hemoglobin, shorter duration of urinary catheterization and postoperative hospitalization (p<0.05). The benefits of VH versus LH were shorter operative time, a smaller drop in hemoglobin, and postoperative hospitalization (p<0.05). There were no differences in complications of AH, LH and VH (13.3%, 10.5%, and 9.5%, respectively p=0.825). CONCLUSIONS: Eighty six point five percent of hysterectomy can be done vaginal or laparoscopic approach. When there is a concerted effort to increase laparoscopic or vaginal hysterectomy, abdominal hysterectomy can decrease without increasing complication rate.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Body Height , Hospitalization , Hysterectomy , Hysterectomy, Vaginal , Medical Records , Operative Time , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Parity , Pathology , Urinary Catheterization , Urinary Catheters
7.
Korean Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology ; : 653-659, 2006.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-111311

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of our study is to evaluate the clinical usefulness of transvaginal sonography (TVS) and saline infusion sonohysterography (SHG) in the evaluation of endometrial abnormality. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 370 patients with abnormal uterine bleeding or uterine cavity abnormalities confirmed by TVS. SHG was carried out by experienced gynecologist, on the same setting in an outpatient clinic after the performance of TVS. Two hundred nineteen patients aged between 23 and 69 years (mean age 41+/-8.2) had operative hysteroscopy (88.2%), hysterectomy (9.1%) and dilatation/curettage (2.7%) within 3 months which provided a detailed description of uterine cavity. Surgical-pathologic findings were compared with the results obtained from TVS and SHG. RESULTS: The sensitivity and specificity were 71.7% and 31.4% for TVS, and 98.4% and 67.6% for SHG respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 84.6% and 17.5% for TVS, and 94.3% and 92.3% for SHG, respectively. Twenty one cases showed a discrepancy between the TVS and SHG, and 16 cases showed a discrepancy between SHG and the pathologic diagnosis. Fifty five cases (25%) in TVS were unconfirmed, but SHG showed 51 pathologic confirmed intracavitary lesion. CONCLUSION: SHG is a sensitive tool and is superior to TVS used alone for evaluation of endometrial abnormalities. SHG definitely enhances the diagnostic potential of TVS in assessment of endometrium and intracavitary pathologies.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Ambulatory Care Facilities , Diagnosis , Endometrium , Hysterectomy , Hysteroscopy , Pathology , Retrospective Studies , Sensitivity and Specificity , Uterine Hemorrhage
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