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1.
Health Policy and Management ; : 255-260, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-914474

ABSTRACT

Background@#Korea National Health Checkup Programs are aimed at the prevention and early detection of cardiovascular disease in adults. To establish a countermeasure for this tendency, The current Korea National Health Checkup Programs have been providing Health Risk Appraisal (HRA) since 2009, thereby focusing on individual lifestyle correction. However, from 2018, the dyslipidemia screening exam cycle has been changed from 2 to 4 years. @*Methods@#In this study, we try to investigate whether policy decisions are valid based on domestic reports that have influenced policy decisions. First, considering the epidemiology of the domestic cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome, the change of the 4-year cycle is appropriate or not. Second, whether the research method that applies came to make policy decisions appropriate or not. Third, our study also investigates whether the direction of policy decision was suitable for the second comprehensive national examination plan. @*Results@#The data that are used in the previous study were that of 10 years ago and there also was a problem in selecting the data, especially the use of one of the research methods to calculate the signal to noise ratio that was aimed at improving health had some problems. This is a research method that does not match with the aim itself. @*Conclusion@#Changing the screening cycle for dyslipidemia does not match the recent trend of general screening to effectively prevent cardiovascular disease in improving individual lifestyles in the national health checkup plan. Studying the relationship with metabolic syndrome, which can be an intermediate stage of cardiovascular disease, could be a policy direction that is more suitable for the national health examination comprehensive plan.

2.
Safety and Health at Work ; : 225-229, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-895634

ABSTRACT

Background@#The socioeconomic burden of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) is significant, and kitchen work is a high-risk occupation for MSDs due to the intensive manual workload and repetitive movements that are involved. However, there are very few studies on MSDs and rest breaks as a workplace intervention among kitchen workers. This study examined the relationship between insufficient rest breaks and increased MSD risk among Korean kitchen workers. @*Methods@#Sociodemographic and occupational factors of 1,909 kitchen workers were collected from the 3rd–4th Korean Working Conditions Survey data. Five items on rest breaks at work were categorized into two groups, “sufficient” and “insufficient.” The number of MSDs and work-related MSDs (WMSDs), an outcome variable, was obtained from the sum of MSDs/WMSDs in three anatomical sites (back, neck, and upper limb, lower limb). The association between rest breaks and MSDs was estimated using zero-inflated negative binomial analyses, with adjustments for age, education level, and weekly working hours, and the analyses were stratified by sex. @*Results@#After adjustment, significant associations were found between insufficient rest breaks and an increased risk of MSDs (odds ratio [OR] 1.68 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11–2.54) and WMSDs (OR 1.40 95% CI 1.01–1.96) among female kitchen workers. Insufficient rest breaks were significantly associated with MSDs in female kitchen workers in all three anatomical sites. @*Conclusion@#This study emphasizes the need for rest breaks as a workplace intervention for preventing MSDs in kitchen workers. Further studies to reveal the causality of this relationship are required.

3.
Safety and Health at Work ; : 225-229, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-903338

ABSTRACT

Background@#The socioeconomic burden of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) is significant, and kitchen work is a high-risk occupation for MSDs due to the intensive manual workload and repetitive movements that are involved. However, there are very few studies on MSDs and rest breaks as a workplace intervention among kitchen workers. This study examined the relationship between insufficient rest breaks and increased MSD risk among Korean kitchen workers. @*Methods@#Sociodemographic and occupational factors of 1,909 kitchen workers were collected from the 3rd–4th Korean Working Conditions Survey data. Five items on rest breaks at work were categorized into two groups, “sufficient” and “insufficient.” The number of MSDs and work-related MSDs (WMSDs), an outcome variable, was obtained from the sum of MSDs/WMSDs in three anatomical sites (back, neck, and upper limb, lower limb). The association between rest breaks and MSDs was estimated using zero-inflated negative binomial analyses, with adjustments for age, education level, and weekly working hours, and the analyses were stratified by sex. @*Results@#After adjustment, significant associations were found between insufficient rest breaks and an increased risk of MSDs (odds ratio [OR] 1.68 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11–2.54) and WMSDs (OR 1.40 95% CI 1.01–1.96) among female kitchen workers. Insufficient rest breaks were significantly associated with MSDs in female kitchen workers in all three anatomical sites. @*Conclusion@#This study emphasizes the need for rest breaks as a workplace intervention for preventing MSDs in kitchen workers. Further studies to reveal the causality of this relationship are required.

4.
Safety and Health at Work ; : 103-108, 2020.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-837151

ABSTRACT

Background@#Presenteeism has emerged as an important health-related issue and has been studied in a variety of occupation groups. This study examines the relationship between emotional labor and presenteeism in nurses in Republic of Korea. @*Methods@#As a cross-sectional study, our study was conducted on 328 female nurses participating in the fourth Korean Working Conditions Survey (2015). Nurses were identified by the Korean Industry Classification Code. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to explore the association between emotional labor and presenteeism. @*Results@#Female nurses who always or sometimes hide their emotions in the workplace were found to have a high risk for presenteeism compared with female nurses who rarely hide their emotions in the workplace {odds ratio [OR] = 2.40 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04–5.54]; OR = 4.12 [95% CI 1.72–9.84], respectively}. Furthermore, the risk of presenteeism was higher in nurses who sometimes engaged with complaining customers compared with nurses who rarely did so, but it lacked statistical significance. @*Conclusion@#Presenteeism in nurses can cause various negative secondary effects; therefore, an alternative should be sought to mediate nurses' emotional labor to prevent presenteeism.

5.
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health ; : 292-298, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-915866

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES@#Presenteeism is currently recognized as a significant global health issue that can potentially cause productivity losses. Hence, many studies have analyzed the relationships between workplace factors and presenteeism. However, few studies have considered non-occupational factors. This study examined the associations between presenteeism and activities outside work, including volunteering, self-development, leisure/sports, and gardening and house repair activities, in Korean wage workers.@*METHODS@#This study analyzed the fourth Korean Working Conditions Survey, in which a total of 19 294 wage workers participated. To identify relationships between presenteeism and activities outside work, multivariate logistic regression analysis was used after adjusting for general and occupational characteristics.@*RESULTS@#Self-development and leisure/sports activities significantly increased the odds ratio (OR) of presenteeism (OR, 1.166; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.061 to 1.282 and OR, 1.276; 95% CI, 1.181 to 1.379, respectively).@*CONCLUSIONS@#Certain activities outside work, such as self-development or leisure/sports, were related to presenteeism among Korean wage workers. Although many previous studies have emphasized the positive effects of those activities on health, this study documented negative effects of these activities outside work on health.

6.
Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine ; : e29-2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-889127

ABSTRACT

Background@#We aimed to find the relationship between sleep duration and impaired fasting glucose according to working type in non-regular workers using the 2016 and 2017 Korean National Health And Nutrition Examination (KNHANE, 7th revision).Method: In the 1st and 2nd year (2016, 2017) of the 7th KNHANE, 16,277 people participated. Minors were excluded because this study was intended for individuals aged 19 years and older.As this study was based on wage workers, unemployment, self-employed workers, employers, unpaid family workers, and those who have insufficient answers such as unknown or no response were excluded. Regular workers were excluded because this study was intended for non-regular workers. Finally, a total of 2,168 people were included in the survey, except those who had been diagnosed with diabetes, had a fasting blood glucose level of 126 mg/dL or higher, or taking hypoglycemic agents or receiving insulin injections. To find the relationship between sleep duration and impaired fasting glucose according to work type in non-regular workers, multiple logistic regression analysis was performed by adjusting the general and occupational characteristics after stratification according to work type. All statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS software (version 26.0; SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). @*Results@#In the case of insufficient sleep duration in irregular female workers, the odds ratio (OR) of impaired fasting glucose was statistically insignificant, but in the case of insufficient sleep duration in irregular male workers who have shift work, the odds ratio (OR) of impaired fasting glucose was significantly higher than that of sufficient sleep duration (Model 1, OR: 3.05, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.18–7.90; Model 2, OR: 2.81, 95% CI: 1.08–7.29). @*Conclusions@#Our findings demonstrate that insufficient sleep duration was associated with an increase in fasting blood glucose levels in non-regular male workers working shifts. This means that non-regular workers are in desperate need for adequate sleep and health care. We hope that our study will help improve the health of non-regular workers and more systematic and prospective follow-up studies will be conducted to further improve the health of nonregular workers.

7.
Korean Journal of Preventive Medicine ; : 292-298, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-766153

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Presenteeism is currently recognized as a significant global health issue that can potentially cause productivity losses. Hence, many studies have analyzed the relationships between workplace factors and presenteeism. However, few studies have considered non-occupational factors. This study examined the associations between presenteeism and activities outside work, including volunteering, self-development, leisure/sports, and gardening and house repair activities, in Korean wage workers. METHODS: This study analyzed the fourth Korean Working Conditions Survey, in which a total of 19 294 wage workers participated. To identify relationships between presenteeism and activities outside work, multivariate logistic regression analysis was used after adjusting for general and occupational characteristics. RESULTS: Self-development and leisure/sports activities significantly increased the odds ratio (OR) of presenteeism (OR, 1.166; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.061 to 1.282 and OR, 1.276; 95% CI, 1.181 to 1.379, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Certain activities outside work, such as self-development or leisure/sports, were related to presenteeism among Korean wage workers. Although many previous studies have emphasized the positive effects of those activities on health, this study documented negative effects of these activities outside work on health.


Subject(s)
Agriculture , Efficiency , Gardening , Global Health , Korea , Logistic Models , Odds Ratio , Presenteeism , Salaries and Fringe Benefits
8.
Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine ; : e30-2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762548

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We aimed to find the exposure level of environmental harmful substances related to the secondhand smoke (SHS) using a nationally representative data of the general population in Korea. METHODS: Total 3,533 people were included in this study. We compared the proportion exceeding 95 percentile of the concentrations of harmful substances by sex according to SHS exposure. 16 kinds of substances related to tobacco smoke were analyzed including heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, and environmental phenol. For 16 kinds of substances, the odds ratios (ORs) for exceeding 95 percentile of each harmful substance were calculated by multiple logistic regression according to SHS exposure. Age, education level, marital status, body mass index, drinking, and exercise were adjusted as covariates. Cotinine level was additionally adjusted to increase reliability of our results. RESULTS: SHS was associated with high exposure of mercury, methylhippuric acid, fluorene, and cotinine. In women, SHS was associated with mercury, methylhippuric acid, fluorene, and cotinine, while in men, it was associated with cotinine. After adjusting covariates, ORs of blood mercury, methylhippuric acid and hydroxyfluorene in the exposed gruop were greater than that in the non-exposed group. Especially in female, methylhippuric acid and hydroxyfluorene showed consistent result. CONCLUSIONS: Our finding demonstrates that SHS is related to several harmful substances. Therefore, to reduce the health effects of SHS, it is necessary to educate and publicize the risk of SHS. Future studies are necessary to more accurately analyze factors such as exposure frequency, time, and pathway of SHS.


Subject(s)
Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Body Mass Index , Cotinine , Cross-Sectional Studies , Drinking , Education , Environmental Health , Korea , Logistic Models , Marital Status , Metals, Heavy , Odds Ratio , Phenol , Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons , Smoke , Nicotiana , Tobacco Smoke Pollution , Volatile Organic Compounds
9.
Safety and Health at Work ; : 437-444, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-786578

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Headache/eyestrain symptoms are common health problems that people experience in daily life. Various studies have examined risk factors contributing to headache/eyestrains, and physicochemical exposure was found to be a leading risk factor in causing such symptoms. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of headache/eyestrain symptoms with physicochemical exposure among Korean construction workers depended on worksite.METHODS: This study used data from the 4th Korean Workers Conditions Survey and selected 1,945 Korean construction workers as participants. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to determine the relationship.RESULTS: Exposure to vibrations among all construction workers affected the moderate exposure group [odds ratio (OR) 1.53, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01–2.32], the high exposure group (OR 1.77 95%CI 1.17–2.67), and the indoor high exposure group (OR 1.61, 95%CI 1.02-2.55) and among outdoor construction workers, the moderate group (OR 6.61, 95%CI 15.4–28.48) and the high group (OR 6.61, 95%CI 1.56–27.98). When exposed to mist, dust, and fumes, the indoor high exposure group was significantly affected (OR 1.63, 95%CI 1.07–2.47). All construction workers exposed to organic solvents were affected, high exposure group (OR 1.69, 95%CI 1.15–2.49) and indoor high exposure group (OR 1.77, 95%CI 1.08–2.89). The high exposure group in all construction worker (OR 1.70, 95%CI 1.20–2.42) and the indoor high exposure group (OR 1.83, 95%CI 1.17–2.89) also were affected by secondhand smoking exposure.CONCLUSION: Many physicochemical exposure factors affect headache/eyestrain symptoms among construction workers, especially indoor construction workers, suggesting a deficiency in occupational hygiene and health environments at indoor construction worksites.


Subject(s)
Dust , Headache , Hygiene , Logistic Models , Risk Factors , Solvents , Tobacco Smoke Pollution , Vibration , Workplace
10.
Safety and Health at Work ; : 512-517, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-786570

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Rest breaks at work are reported to reduce fatigue and job stress. Apartment janitors in Korea who perform night shift work and work long hours can be exposed to various health problems (HPs). However, few studies have evaluated relationships between their rest breaks and HPs. This study was conducted to examine the relationships between long working hours, shift work, and insufficient rest breaks and HPs among Korean apartment janitors.METHODS: Data on 1,212 selected male apartment janitors were obtained from the 3rd and 4th Korean Working Conditions Surveys. Demographic and occupational characteristics were collected using self-reported questionnaires. Rest breaks at work were classified as “sufficient” or “insufficient.” Long working hours were considered as working more than 60 hours per week. Zero-inflated negative binomial (ZINB) regression was performed to investigate the effects of shift work and long working hours on HPs and the effects of rest breaks on relationships between HPs and long working hours and shift work.RESULTS: Among those with insufficient rest breaks at work, significant associations were found between long working hours and the risk of HPs [odds ratio (OR) = 1.489; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.038–2.136] and work-related HPs (WRHPs) [OR 1.621; 95% CI = 1.156–2.272], and between shift work and HPs [OR = 1.603; 95% CI = 1.084–2.372]. These relationships became nonsignificant when sufficient rest breaks were provided.CONCLUSION: It is important to provide breaks at work to reduce HPs because of long working hours and shift work among aged workers such as apartment janitors.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Fatigue , Korea
11.
Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine ; : e29-2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-896831

ABSTRACT

Background@#We aimed to find the relationship between sleep duration and impaired fasting glucose according to working type in non-regular workers using the 2016 and 2017 Korean National Health And Nutrition Examination (KNHANE, 7th revision).Method: In the 1st and 2nd year (2016, 2017) of the 7th KNHANE, 16,277 people participated. Minors were excluded because this study was intended for individuals aged 19 years and older.As this study was based on wage workers, unemployment, self-employed workers, employers, unpaid family workers, and those who have insufficient answers such as unknown or no response were excluded. Regular workers were excluded because this study was intended for non-regular workers. Finally, a total of 2,168 people were included in the survey, except those who had been diagnosed with diabetes, had a fasting blood glucose level of 126 mg/dL or higher, or taking hypoglycemic agents or receiving insulin injections. To find the relationship between sleep duration and impaired fasting glucose according to work type in non-regular workers, multiple logistic regression analysis was performed by adjusting the general and occupational characteristics after stratification according to work type. All statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS software (version 26.0; SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). @*Results@#In the case of insufficient sleep duration in irregular female workers, the odds ratio (OR) of impaired fasting glucose was statistically insignificant, but in the case of insufficient sleep duration in irregular male workers who have shift work, the odds ratio (OR) of impaired fasting glucose was significantly higher than that of sufficient sleep duration (Model 1, OR: 3.05, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.18–7.90; Model 2, OR: 2.81, 95% CI: 1.08–7.29). @*Conclusions@#Our findings demonstrate that insufficient sleep duration was associated with an increase in fasting blood glucose levels in non-regular male workers working shifts. This means that non-regular workers are in desperate need for adequate sleep and health care. We hope that our study will help improve the health of non-regular workers and more systematic and prospective follow-up studies will be conducted to further improve the health of nonregular workers.

12.
Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine ; : 17-2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762531

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In modern society, the scale of the service industry is continuously expanding, and the number of service workers is increasing. Correspondingly, physical and mental problems related to emotional labor are becoming a major social problem. In this study, we investigated the relationship between emotional labor, workplace violence, and depressive symptoms in female bank employees, which is a typical service industry. METHODS: In this study, the Korean Emotional Labor Scale (K-ELS) and Korean Workplace Violence Scale (K-WVS) were distributed to 381 female workers in their 20s at a bank in Seoul, Korea. Data were obtained from 289 subjects (75.9%) and analyzed for 278 respondents, after excluding those with missing responses. We examined the relationship between emotional labor, workplace violence, and depressive symptoms, using multiple logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Among 278 subjects, 27 workers (9.7%) had depressive symptoms. “Emotional disharmony and hurt” (OR 2.93, 95% CI = 1.17–7.36) and “Organizational surveillance and monitoring” (OR 3.18, 95% CI = 1.29–7.86) showed a significant association with depressive symptoms. For workplace violence, the “Experience of psychological and sexual violence from supervisors and coworkers” (OR 4.07, 95% CI = 1.58–10.50) showed a significant association. When the number of high-risk emotional labor-related factors was 1 or more, 13.1% showed depressive symptoms. When the number of high-risk workplace violence-related factors was 1 or more, 14.4% had statistically significant depressive symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: A significant result was found for depressive symptoms related to Emotional disharmony, which is a sub-topic of emotional labor, and those at high risk for “Organizational surveillance and monitoring.” For workplace violence, depressive symptoms were high for the group at high risk for the “experience of psychological and sexual violence from supervisors and coworkers.” In this way, management of emotional disharmony, a sub-factor of emotional labor, is necessary, and improvements to traditional corporate culture that monitors emotional labor is necessary. Violence from colleagues and supervisors in the workplace must also be reduced. IRB Approval No. SCHUH 2017–01-029. Registered 26 January 2017. Retrospectively registered. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (10.1186/s40557-018-0229-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Depression , Ethics Committees, Research , Korea , Logistic Models , Organizational Culture , Retrospective Studies , Seoul , Sex Offenses , Social Problems , Surveys and Questionnaires , Violence , Workplace Violence
13.
Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine ; : 67-2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762481

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It has been reported that long working hours are hazardous to the workers’ health. Especially, work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) have been considered as one of the significant health issues in workplace. The objective of this study was to identify the association between long working hours and work-related musculoskeletal symptoms. METHODS: The analysis was conducted using data from the Fourth Korean Working Conditions Survey (KWCS). Subjects of this study were 24,783 wage workers and divided into three groups according to the weekly working hours, which were ≤ 40, 41–52 and > 52 h. The relationship between long working hours and work-related musculoskeletal symptoms was analyzed by multivariate logistic regression method after adjusting for general, occupational characteristics including specific working motions or postures and psychosocial factors. RESULTS: Approximately 18.4% of subjects worked more than 52 h per week and 26.4 and 16.4% of male subjects and 33.0 and 23.4% of female subjects experienced work-related upper and lower limb pains, respectively, over the last 12 months. Moreover, the prevalence of upper and lower limb pain was increased in both genders as the weekly working hours increased. The odds ratios (ORs) of upper limb pain for those working 41–52 h and more than 52 h per week when adjusted for general, occupational characteristics including specific motions or postures and psychosocial factors were 1.36 and 1.40 for male workers and 1.26 and 1.66 for female workers compared to the reference group, respectively. Furthermore, ORs of lower limb pain for the same weekly working hour groups were 1.26 and 1.47 for male workers and 1.20 and 1.47 for female workers, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Long working hours were significantly related to work-related musculoskeletal symptoms in Korean wage workers and appropriate interventions should be implemented to reduce long working hours that can negatively affect workers’ health.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Male , Logistic Models , Lower Extremity , Methods , Odds Ratio , Posture , Prevalence , Psychology , Salaries and Fringe Benefits , Upper Extremity
14.
Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine ; : 46-2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-126532

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Around the globe, discrimination has emerged as a social issue requiring serious consideration. From the perspective of public health, the impact of discrimination on the health of affected individuals is a subject of great importance. On the other hand, subjective well-being is a key indicator of an individual's physical, mental, and social health. The present study aims to analyze the relationship between Korean employed workers' subjective health and their exposure to perceived discrimination. METHODS: The Fourth Korean Working Conditions Survey (KWCS, 2014) was conducted on a representative sample of the economically active population aged 15 years or older, who were either employees or self-employed at the time of interview. After removing inconsistent data, 32,984 employed workers were examined in this study. The data included general and occupational characteristics, perceived discrimination, and well-being. Well-being was measured through the WHO-Five index (1998 version). Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between perceived discrimination and well-being. RESULT: As a group, employed workers who were exposed to discrimination had a significantly higher likelihood of “poor well-being” than their counterparts who were not exposed to discrimination. More specifically, the workers exposed to age discrimination had an odds ratio(OR) of 1.51 (95% CI: 1.36–1.68), workers exposed to discrimination based on educational attainment had an OR of 1.43 (95% CI: 1.26–1.61), and workers exposed to discrimination based on employment type had an OR of 1.68 (95% CI: 1.48–1.91) with respect to poor well-being. Furthermore, workers exposed to a greater number of discriminatory incidents were also at a higher risk of “poor well-being” than their counterparts who were exposed to fewer such incidents. More specifically, the workers with three exposures to discrimination had an OR of 2.60 (95% CI: 1.92–3.53), the workers with two such exposures had an OR of 1.69 (95% CI: 1.44–1.99), and the workers with one such exposure had an OR of 1.32 (95% CI: 1.20–1.45). CONCLUSION: The present study found that discrimination based on age, educational attainment, or employment type put workers at a higher risk of “poor well-being,” and that the greater the exposure to discrimination, the higher the risk of poor well-being.


Subject(s)
Ageism , Diagnostic Self Evaluation , Discrimination, Psychological , Employment , Hand , Logistic Models , Public Health
15.
Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine ; : 51-2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-126527

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sleep disorders and depression/anxiety disorders are long-standing and significant problem for mental health. Also there are already known so many negative health effect of these disorders. But there were few studies to examine the association between activities outside work and forementioned disorders. So this study aimed the association of those things by using the Republic of Korean data. METHODS: Data from 32,232 wage workers were used in the 4th Korean Working Condition Survey. General and occupational characteristics, sleep disorders, depression/anxiety disorders and activities outside work are included in questionnaire. To find the relationship between activities outside work and sleep, depression/anxiety disorders, multivariate logistic regression analysis was used after adjusting for general and occupational characteristics. RESULTS: We observed that volunteer activities increased the odds ratio of both sleep disorders and depression/anxiety disorders(Odds ratio[OR] = 1.35, 95% confidence interval[CI]: 1.03–1.78 and OR = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.29–1.84, respectively). And self-development activities increase the odds ratio of sleep disorders(OR = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.17–1.57). Gardening activities lowered the odds ratio of depression/anxiety disorders(OR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.59–0.94). CONCLUSION: Some of activities outside work were related to sleep disorders and depression/anxiety disorders among Korean wage workers. Our results showed negative health effect of some kinds of activities outside work such as volunteering and self-devlopment compared to other studies that emphasized positive effect of those activities for health.


Subject(s)
Agriculture , Anxiety , Depression , Gardening , Leisure Activities , Logistic Models , Mental Health , Odds Ratio , Salaries and Fringe Benefits , Sleep Wake Disorders , Volunteers
16.
Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine ; : 32-2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-68575

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Discrimination is a long-standing social problem, and interest in the health effects of discrimination has been increasing. Unfortunately, Korean workers experience various types and combinations of discrimination. This study aimed to examine the association between perceived discrimination and depression/anxiety disorders among Korean workers. METHODS: Data from 33,530 paid workers were extracted from the third Korean Working Conditions Survey. The data included general characteristics, occupational characteristics, perceived discrimination, and depression/anxiety disorders. To examine the relationship between perceived discrimination and depression/anxiety disorders, multiple logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate depression/anxiety disorders as the dependent variable and perceived discrimination as the independent variable, after adjusting for relevant general and occupational characteristics. RESULTS: After adjusting for the relevant general and occupational characteristics, we observed that male and female workers who had experienced perceived discrimination exhibited a significantly higher likelihood of having depression/anxiety disorders. The odds ratios among male and female workers were 3.25 (95 % confidence interval: 2.45–4.32) and 4.56 (95 % confidence interval: 3.45–6.03), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Perceived discrimination was significantly related to depression or anxiety disorders among Korean workers. The risk of depression or anxiety was higher among female workers, compared to male workers.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Male , Anxiety , Anxiety Disorders , Depression , Discrimination, Psychological , Logistic Models , Odds Ratio , Social Problems
17.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : 164-170, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-133745

ABSTRACT

We aimed to examine whether there is a correlation between the health recovery of industrial accident victims and their perceived socioeconomic status. Data were obtained from the first Panel Study of Worker's Compensation Insurance, which included 2,000 participants. We performed multivariate regression analysis and determined the odds ratios for participants with a subjectively lower socioeconomic status and for those with a subjectively lower middle socioeconomic status using 95% confidence intervals. An additional multivariate regression analysis yielded the odds ratios for participants with a subjectively lower socioeconomic status and those with a subjectively upper middle socioeconomic class using 95% confidence intervals. Of all participants, 299 reported a full recovery, whereas 1,701 did not. We examined the odds ratio (95% confidence intervals) for participants' health recovery according to their subjective socioeconomic status while controlling for sex, age, education, tobacco use, alcohol use, subjective state of health prior to the accident, chronic disease, employment duration, recovery period, accident type, disability status, disability rating, and economic participation. The odds of recovery in participants with a subjectively lower middle socioeconomic status were 1.707 times greater (1.264-2.305) than that of those with a subjectively lower socioeconomic status. Similarly, the odds of recovery in participants with a subjectively upper middle socioeconomic status were 3.124 times greater (1.795-5.438) than that of those with a subjectively lower socioeconomic status. Our findings indicate that participants' perceived socioeconomic disparities extend to disparities in their health status. The reinforcement of welfare measures is greatly needed to temper these disparities.


Subject(s)
Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Accidents, Occupational/psychology , Age Factors , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Status Disparities , Insurance Benefits , Odds Ratio , Regression Analysis , Republic of Korea , Sex Factors , Social Class , Workers' Compensation
18.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : 164-170, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-133744

ABSTRACT

We aimed to examine whether there is a correlation between the health recovery of industrial accident victims and their perceived socioeconomic status. Data were obtained from the first Panel Study of Worker's Compensation Insurance, which included 2,000 participants. We performed multivariate regression analysis and determined the odds ratios for participants with a subjectively lower socioeconomic status and for those with a subjectively lower middle socioeconomic status using 95% confidence intervals. An additional multivariate regression analysis yielded the odds ratios for participants with a subjectively lower socioeconomic status and those with a subjectively upper middle socioeconomic class using 95% confidence intervals. Of all participants, 299 reported a full recovery, whereas 1,701 did not. We examined the odds ratio (95% confidence intervals) for participants' health recovery according to their subjective socioeconomic status while controlling for sex, age, education, tobacco use, alcohol use, subjective state of health prior to the accident, chronic disease, employment duration, recovery period, accident type, disability status, disability rating, and economic participation. The odds of recovery in participants with a subjectively lower middle socioeconomic status were 1.707 times greater (1.264-2.305) than that of those with a subjectively lower socioeconomic status. Similarly, the odds of recovery in participants with a subjectively upper middle socioeconomic status were 3.124 times greater (1.795-5.438) than that of those with a subjectively lower socioeconomic status. Our findings indicate that participants' perceived socioeconomic disparities extend to disparities in their health status. The reinforcement of welfare measures is greatly needed to temper these disparities.


Subject(s)
Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Accidents, Occupational/psychology , Age Factors , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Status Disparities , Insurance Benefits , Odds Ratio , Regression Analysis , Republic of Korea , Sex Factors , Social Class , Workers' Compensation
19.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : 1748-1753, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-164161

ABSTRACT

Workplace violence is related to various health effects including mental illness such as anxiety or depression. In this study, the relationship between the experience of workplace violence and depression in substitute drivers in Korea, namely, daeri drivers, was investigated. To assess workplace violence, questions regarding types and frequency of the experience of violence over the past year were asked to the daeri drivers. In order to assess the risk of depression, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale was used. Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals of depression were estimated using multiple logistic regression analysis. All of the daeri drivers had experienced instance of verbal violence while driving and 66 of the drivers (34.1%) had been in such a situation more than once in the past quarter of a year. Sixty-eight daeri drivers (42.2%) had experienced certain type of physical violence over the past year. Compared to daeri drivers who had experienced workplace verbal violence less than 4 times and who had not experienced workplace physical violence over the past year, higher odds ratio was observed in daeri drivers who had experienced workplace verbal violence or physical violence, more than 4 times and more than one time respectively, after adjustment. Experience of verbal or physical type of workplace violence over the past year increased the risk of depression in the daeri drivers. Because violence against drivers can compromise the safety of the driver, the customer, and all the passengers, it is imperative that the safety and health of daeri drivers be highlighted.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aged , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Automobile Driving/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Driving Under the Influence/prevention & control , Occupational Health , Odds Ratio , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace Violence
20.
Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine ; : 19-2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-52295

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this paper was report first case of renal cell carcinoma developed in a worker who worked in an automobile manufacture line which handles trichloroethylene in Korea. CASE PRESENTATION: To clarify the relationship between the onset of renal cell carcinoma in 52-years old male worker and the exposure to trichloroethylene, document studies and work environment measurement were done. Past work environment exposure data were reviewed and medical history and surgery records of the worker were also reviewed. The patient had no personal risk factor related to renal cell carcinoma except for his smoking habit of quarter a pack per day for twenty years, and since trichloroethylene was not part of measurement criteria, past work environment risk assessment data could not verify the exposure. The exposure level is deduced by analyzing material exposure level of work environments which has similar processes in data from revised research of chemical exposure standard and work environment validity assessment. Evaluation Committee of Epidemiologic Survey decided that there are relevant relationship between the exposure and the disease, though we do not have exact data during that period, most experts agree that in every factories they used trichloroethylene without any direction. CONCLUSIONS: From the relevant medical history and the results of the usage of trichloroethylene in the relevant industries, and initial discovery of renal cell carcinoma at health inspection sonogram in 2001, it can be concluded that suggests significant causal relationship between the exposure to trichloroethylene and renal cell carcinoma onset, thus reporting it to be the first domestic case declared to be occupational disease.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Automobiles , Carcinoma, Renal Cell , Korea , Occupational Diseases , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Smoke , Smoking , Trichloroethylene
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