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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-926954

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance efficiency of two different drill combinations according to the heat generated and drilling time. @*Materials and methods@#. In this study, cow ribs were used as research materials. To test the specimen, cow bones were rid of fascia and muscles, and a temperature sensor was mounted around the drilling area. The experimental group was divided into a group using a guide drill and a group using a Lindmann drill according to the drill used before the initial drilling. The drilling sequence of the guide drilling group is as follows; guide drill (ø 2.25), initial drill (ø 2.25), twist drill (ø 2.80), and twist drill (ø 3.20). The drilling sequence of the Lindmann drilling group is as follows; Lindmann drill (ø 2.10), initial drill (ø 2.25), twist drill (ø 2.80), and twist drill (ø 3.20). The temperature was measured after drilling. For statistical analysis, the difference between the groups was analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test and the Friedman test was used (α = .05). @*Results@#. The average performance efficiency for each specimen of guide drilling group ranged from 0.3861 to 1.1385 mm3/s and that of Lindmann drilling group ranged from 0.1700 to 0.4199 mm3/s. The two drill combinations contained a guide drill and Lindmann drill as their first drills. The combination using the guide drill demonstrated excellent performance efficiency when calculated using the drilling time (P < .001). @*Conclusion@#. Since the guide drill group showed better performance efficiency than the Lindmann drill group, the use of the guide drill was more suitable for the primary drilling process.

2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-903480

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#This study aimed to evaluate the effect of repeated use of an implant handpiece under an implant placement torque (35 Ncm) and overloading torque condition (50 Ncm) on an output torque. @*Materials and Methods@#Two types of implant handpiece systems (Surgicpro/X-DSG20L [NSK, Kanuma, Japan] and SIP20/CRB46LN [SAESHIN, Daegu, South Korea]) were used. The output torque was measured using a digital torque gauge. The height and angle (x, y, and z axes) of the digital torque gauge and implant handpiece were adjusted through a jig for passive connection. The experiment was conducted under the setting torque value of 35 Ncm (implant placement torque) and 50 Ncm (overloading torque condition) and 30 times per set; a total of 5 sets were performed (N = 150).For statistical analysis, the difference between the groups was analyzed using the Mann–Whitney U test and the Friedman test was used to confirm the change in output torque (α=.05). @*Results@#NSK and SAESHIN implant handpieces showed significant differences in output torque results at the setting torques of 35 Ncm and 50 Ncm (P <.001). The type of implant handpiece and repeated use influenced the output torque (P <.001). @*Conclusion@#. There may be a difference between the setting torque and actual output torque due to repeated use, and the implant handpiece should be managed and repaired during long-term use. In addition, for successful implant results in dental clinics, the output torque of the implant handpiece system should be checked before implant placement.

3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-895776

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#This study aimed to evaluate the effect of repeated use of an implant handpiece under an implant placement torque (35 Ncm) and overloading torque condition (50 Ncm) on an output torque. @*Materials and Methods@#Two types of implant handpiece systems (Surgicpro/X-DSG20L [NSK, Kanuma, Japan] and SIP20/CRB46LN [SAESHIN, Daegu, South Korea]) were used. The output torque was measured using a digital torque gauge. The height and angle (x, y, and z axes) of the digital torque gauge and implant handpiece were adjusted through a jig for passive connection. The experiment was conducted under the setting torque value of 35 Ncm (implant placement torque) and 50 Ncm (overloading torque condition) and 30 times per set; a total of 5 sets were performed (N = 150).For statistical analysis, the difference between the groups was analyzed using the Mann–Whitney U test and the Friedman test was used to confirm the change in output torque (α=.05). @*Results@#NSK and SAESHIN implant handpieces showed significant differences in output torque results at the setting torques of 35 Ncm and 50 Ncm (P <.001). The type of implant handpiece and repeated use influenced the output torque (P <.001). @*Conclusion@#. There may be a difference between the setting torque and actual output torque due to repeated use, and the implant handpiece should be managed and repaired during long-term use. In addition, for successful implant results in dental clinics, the output torque of the implant handpiece system should be checked before implant placement.

4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-915362

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the change in the temperature of the adhesive resin in polycrystalline ceramic brackets irradiated using a diode laser at different irradiation energy levels and times. @*Materials and Methods@#For the measurement of the temperature of the adhesive resin, it was applied at the base of the ceramic bracket, a thermocouple was placed at the center of the base surface, the bracket was placed on prepared resin specimens for light curing, and a laser was irradiated to the center of the bracket slot at 5, 7, and 10 W. For the measurement of the temperatures of the enamel under the bracket and pulp cavity, extracted premolar was fixed to a prepared mold and the ceramic bracket was bonded to the buccal surface of the premolar. The Kruskal–Wallis H test and Friedman test were used for statistical analysis.Result: At 5 W, the temperature of the adhesive resin did not reach the resin softening temperature of 200°C within 30 seconds. At 7 W, it reached 200°C when the ceramic bracket was irradiated continuously for 28 seconds. At 10 W, it reached 200°C when the ceramic bracket was irradiated continuously for 15 seconds. During laser irradiation, the temperature of the enamel under the bracket increased by over 5°C within 15 seconds. @*Conclusion@#The use of diode laser irradiation for bracket debonding should be carefully considered because the pulp cavity temperature increases by over 5°C within the irradiation time for resin thermal softening.

5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-915361

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The technique introduced in this study describes a technique for surface treatment that applies a photocuring resin to the surface of an interim crown fabricated by three-dimensional (3D) printing without a conventional polishing method. The purpose of this study was to evaluate marginal and internal fit and the intaglio surface trueness of interim crowns after surface treatment of 3D-printed crowns for clinical application. @*Materials and Methods@#An interim crown was fabricated using a 3D printer with digital light-processing technology, and the surface support was removed. After the posttreatment process, the resin was thinly applied to the surface of the interim crown and polymerized to solve the esthetic problem of the surface without the conventional polishing process. In addition, the marginal and internal fits were measured to verify the clinical use of this technique, and the trueness was evaluated to confirm the deformation of the inner surface according to the technical application of the outer surface of the interim crown. The difference before and after the evaluation by a statistical method was verified using an independent t-test (α=0.05).Result: There was no significant difference in the marginal and internal fit before and after the application of this technique (P>0.05). There was no significant difference in intaglio surface trueness before and after the application of this technique (P=0.963). @*Conclusion@#There was no change in the marginal and internal fit or in intaglio surface trueness of the interim crowns to which this technology was applied. This surface treatment technique is a more convenient method for interim crowns fabricated using 3D-printing technology without the conventional polishing process.

6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-891951

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Using two types of electronic apex locators, this study aimed to investigate the differences in accuracy according to the evaluator and equipment. @*Materials and Methods@#Artificial teeth of the lower first premolars and two mandibular acrylic models (A and B) were used in this study. In the artificial teeth, the pulp chamber was opened and the access cavity was prepared.Using calibrated digital Vernier calipers, the distance from the top of the cavity and the root apex was measured to assess the actual distance between two artificial teeth. The evaluation was conducted by 20 dentists, and each evaluator repeated measurements for each electronic apex locator five times. The difference between the actual distance from the top of the cavity to the root apex and the distance measured using electronic measuring equipment was compared. For statistical analysis, the Friedman test the Mann–Whitney U-test were conducted and the differences between groups were analyzed (α=0.05).Result: As for the accuracy of measurement according to the two types of electronic apex locators, the value of the measurement error was 0.4753 mm in Dentaport ZX and 0.3321 mm in E-Cube Plus. Moreover, electronic apex locators Dentaport ZX and E-Cube Plus showed statistically significant differences (P<0.05). As for the difference in the accuracy of the two types of electronic apex locators according to the evaluator, the resulting values differed depending on the evaluator and showed a statistically significant difference (P<0.001). @*Conclusion@#Electronic apex locator E-Cube Plus showed higher accuracy than did Dentaport ZX. Nevertheless, both types of electronic apex locators showed 100% accuracy in finding the region within root apex ±0.5 mm zone. Fur-thermore, according to the evaluator, the two electronic apex locators showed different resulting values.

7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-891517

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The purpose of this study was to assess the marginal and internal fit of interim crowns fabricated by two different manu-facturing method (subtractive manufacturing technology and additive manufacturing technology). @*Materials and Methods@#Forty study models were fabricated with plasters by making an impression of a master model of the maxillary right first molar for ceramic crown. On each study model, interim crowns (n = 40) were fabricated using three types of 3D printers (Meg-printer 2; Megagen, Zenith U; Dentis, and Zenith D; Dentis) and one type milling machine (imes-icore 450i; imes-icore GmbH). The internal of the interim crowns were filled with silicon and fitted to the study model. Internal scan data was obtained using an intraoral scanner. The fit of in-terim crowns were evaluated in the margin, absolute margin, axial, cusp, and occlusal area by using the superimposition of 3D scan data (Geomagic control X; 3D Systems). The Kruskal-wallis test, Mann-Whitney U test and Bonferroni correction method were used to compare the results among groups (α = 0.05). @*Results@#There was no significant difference in the absolute marginal discrepancy of the temporary crown manufactured by three 3D printers and one milling machine (P = 0.812). There was a significant difference between the milling machine and the 3D printer in the axial and occlusal area (P < 0.001). The temporary crown with the milling machine showed smaller axial gap and higher occlusal gap than 3D printer. @*Conclusion@#Since the marginal fit of the temporary crown produced by three types of 3D printers were all with in clinically acceptable range (< 120 µm), it can be sufficiently used for the fab-rication of the temporary crown.

8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-837273

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The purpose of this study was to evaluate the machining precision and the marginal and internal fit of single restorations fabricated with three types of lithium disilicate ceramic blocks and to evaluate the correlation. @*Materials and methods@#Single restorations were designed using a CAD software program. The crown designed model file was extracted from the CAD software program. Three types of lithium disilicate blocks (Rosetta; HASS, IPS e.max CAD; Ivoclar vivadent, VITA Suprinity; VITA) were milled using a milling machine. For the fabrication of the crown scanned model file, the intaglio surface of the restoration was digitized using a contact scanner. Then, using the three-dimensional inspection software (Geomagic control X; 3D Systems), the process of the overlap of the crown designed model and the scanned model and 3-dimensional analysis was conducted. In addition, the marginal and internal fit of the crowns was evaluated by a silicone replication method. The difference among three types of single ceramic crown was analyzed using a Kruskal-Wallis H test, and Spearman correlation analysis was performed to analyze the correlation between machining precision and fitness (α=.05) @*Results@#There was a significant difference in the machining precision and the marginal and internal fit according to the type of ceramic block (P<.001). In addition, the machining precision and the marginal and internal fit were positively correlated (P<.001). @*Conclusion@#The marginal fit of crowns fabricated according to the types of ceramic blocks was within the clinically acceptable range (< 120 µm), so it can be regarded as appropriate machining precision applicable to all clinical as aspects in terms of the marginal fit.

9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-837229

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE@#The purpose of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of displacement while tightening the screw of scan bodies, which were compared according to the material type. @*MATERIALS AND METHODS@#Three types of scan bodies whose base regions were made up of polyether ether ketone (PEEK) material [Straumann Group, Dentium Group, and Myfit (PEEK) Group] and another scan body whose base region was made up of titanium material [Myfit (Metal) Group] were used (15 per group). The reference model was fabricated by aligning the scan body library on the central axis of the implant, and moving this position by the resin model. The screws of the scan bodies were tightened to the implant fixture with torques of 5 Ncm, 10 Ncm, and a hand tightening torque. After the application of the torque, the scan bodies were scanned using a laboratory scanner. To evaluate the vertical, horizontal, and 3-dimensional (3D) displacements, a 3D inspection software program was used. To examine the difference among groups, one-way analysis of variance and Tukey’s HSD post hoc test were used (α=.05). @*RESULTS@#There were significant differences in 3D, vertical, and horizontal displacements among the different types of scan bodies (P<.001). There was a significantly lower displacement in the Straumann group than in the Myfit (PEEK) and Dentium groups (P<.05). @*CONCLUSION@#The horizontal displacement in all groups was less than 10 µm. With the hand tightening torque, a high vertical displacement of over 100 µm occurred in PEEK scan bodies (Myfit and Dentium). Therefore, it is recommended to apply a tightening torque of 5 Ncm instead of a hand tightening torque.

10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-903457

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE@#The present study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of a desktop scanner and intraoral scanners based on the volumetric dimensions of a complete arch. @*MATERIALS AND METHODS@#Seven reference models were fabricated based on the volumetric dimensions of complete arch (70%, 80%, 90%, 100%, 110%, 120%, and 130%). The reference models were digitized using an industrial scanner (Solutionix C500; MEDIT) for the fabrication of a computer-aided design (CAD) reference model (CRM). The reference models were digitized using three intraoral scanners (CS3600, Trios3, and i500) and one desktop scanner (E1) to fabricate a CAD test model (CTM). CRM and CTM were then superimposed using inspection software, and 3D analysis was conducted. For statistical analysis, one-way analysis of variance was used to verify the difference in accuracy based on the volumetric dimensions of the complete arch and the accuracy based on the scanners, and the differences among the groups were analyzed using the Tukey HSD test as a post-hoc test (α=.05). @*RESULTS@#The three different scanners showed a significant difference in accuracy based on the volumetric dimensions of the complete arch (P<.05), but the desktop scanner did not show a significant difference in accuracy based on the volumetric dimensions of the complete arch (P=.808). @*CONCLUSION@#The accuracy of the intraoral scanners was dependent on the volumetric dimensions of the complete arch, but the volumetric dimensions of the complete arch had no effect on the accuracy of the desktop scanner. Additionally, depending on the type of intraoral scanners, the accuracy differed according to the volumetric dimensions of the complete arch.

11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-899655

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Using two types of electronic apex locators, this study aimed to investigate the differences in accuracy according to the evaluator and equipment. @*Materials and Methods@#Artificial teeth of the lower first premolars and two mandibular acrylic models (A and B) were used in this study. In the artificial teeth, the pulp chamber was opened and the access cavity was prepared.Using calibrated digital Vernier calipers, the distance from the top of the cavity and the root apex was measured to assess the actual distance between two artificial teeth. The evaluation was conducted by 20 dentists, and each evaluator repeated measurements for each electronic apex locator five times. The difference between the actual distance from the top of the cavity to the root apex and the distance measured using electronic measuring equipment was compared. For statistical analysis, the Friedman test the Mann–Whitney U-test were conducted and the differences between groups were analyzed (α=0.05).Result: As for the accuracy of measurement according to the two types of electronic apex locators, the value of the measurement error was 0.4753 mm in Dentaport ZX and 0.3321 mm in E-Cube Plus. Moreover, electronic apex locators Dentaport ZX and E-Cube Plus showed statistically significant differences (P<0.05). As for the difference in the accuracy of the two types of electronic apex locators according to the evaluator, the resulting values differed depending on the evaluator and showed a statistically significant difference (P<0.001). @*Conclusion@#Electronic apex locator E-Cube Plus showed higher accuracy than did Dentaport ZX. Nevertheless, both types of electronic apex locators showed 100% accuracy in finding the region within root apex ±0.5 mm zone. Fur-thermore, according to the evaluator, the two electronic apex locators showed different resulting values.

12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-899221

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The purpose of this study was to assess the marginal and internal fit of interim crowns fabricated by two different manu-facturing method (subtractive manufacturing technology and additive manufacturing technology). @*Materials and Methods@#Forty study models were fabricated with plasters by making an impression of a master model of the maxillary right first molar for ceramic crown. On each study model, interim crowns (n = 40) were fabricated using three types of 3D printers (Meg-printer 2; Megagen, Zenith U; Dentis, and Zenith D; Dentis) and one type milling machine (imes-icore 450i; imes-icore GmbH). The internal of the interim crowns were filled with silicon and fitted to the study model. Internal scan data was obtained using an intraoral scanner. The fit of in-terim crowns were evaluated in the margin, absolute margin, axial, cusp, and occlusal area by using the superimposition of 3D scan data (Geomagic control X; 3D Systems). The Kruskal-wallis test, Mann-Whitney U test and Bonferroni correction method were used to compare the results among groups (α = 0.05). @*Results@#There was no significant difference in the absolute marginal discrepancy of the temporary crown manufactured by three 3D printers and one milling machine (P = 0.812). There was a significant difference between the milling machine and the 3D printer in the axial and occlusal area (P < 0.001). The temporary crown with the milling machine showed smaller axial gap and higher occlusal gap than 3D printer. @*Conclusion@#Since the marginal fit of the temporary crown produced by three types of 3D printers were all with in clinically acceptable range (< 120 µm), it can be sufficiently used for the fab-rication of the temporary crown.

13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-895753

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE@#The present study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of a desktop scanner and intraoral scanners based on the volumetric dimensions of a complete arch. @*MATERIALS AND METHODS@#Seven reference models were fabricated based on the volumetric dimensions of complete arch (70%, 80%, 90%, 100%, 110%, 120%, and 130%). The reference models were digitized using an industrial scanner (Solutionix C500; MEDIT) for the fabrication of a computer-aided design (CAD) reference model (CRM). The reference models were digitized using three intraoral scanners (CS3600, Trios3, and i500) and one desktop scanner (E1) to fabricate a CAD test model (CTM). CRM and CTM were then superimposed using inspection software, and 3D analysis was conducted. For statistical analysis, one-way analysis of variance was used to verify the difference in accuracy based on the volumetric dimensions of the complete arch and the accuracy based on the scanners, and the differences among the groups were analyzed using the Tukey HSD test as a post-hoc test (α=.05). @*RESULTS@#The three different scanners showed a significant difference in accuracy based on the volumetric dimensions of the complete arch (P<.05), but the desktop scanner did not show a significant difference in accuracy based on the volumetric dimensions of the complete arch (P=.808). @*CONCLUSION@#The accuracy of the intraoral scanners was dependent on the volumetric dimensions of the complete arch, but the volumetric dimensions of the complete arch had no effect on the accuracy of the desktop scanner. Additionally, depending on the type of intraoral scanners, the accuracy differed according to the volumetric dimensions of the complete arch.

14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-764427

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study evaluated the usability of and satisfaction with two types of computer-aided design (CAD) software among users who had experience with dental implant CAD software and those who did not. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Dental technicians (n = 20) who had previous experience with dental implant CAD Software and students from the College of Dentistry (n = 12) who had never designed implant custom abutments were asked to evaluate two types of CAD Software, Exocad and Deltanine. In addition, the participants were asked to fill out a structured questionnaire (Section 1: Entering basic information and retrieving files; Section 2: Setting conditions before abutment design; Section 3: Setting abutment design; and Section 4: Overall satisfaction). For the statistical analysis of the collected data, Mann-Whitney U test was used (α = .05). RESULTS: The ease of design and satisfaction with the implant CAD Software, evaluated with respect to 21 statements divided into four Stages, were significantly higher for Exocad in both groups for Secion 1. For Sections 2 and 3, participants with experience evaluated Deltanine to be significantly better. For Section 4, both groups evaluated Exocad Software to be better. CONCLUSION: Overall, the Exocad Software was evaluated as having better usability and offering greater satisfaction. However, in terms of performance in the core of the design process, i.e. Sections 2 and 3, Deltanine was rated higher by the experienced users. Thus, if the user interface design parts are supplemented, Deltanine CAD Software could be put to a wider use in clinics.


Subject(s)
Computer-Aided Design , Dental Implants , Dental Technicians , Dentistry , Humans
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-786584

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aims to evaluate the loosening torque on the implant fixture, and to assess the accuracy of difference electronic torque drivers.MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three electronic torque drivers were used to measure the loosening torque on the implant system (AnyOne; MegaGen). The implant fixtures were divided among the 3 electronic torque driver types (W&H, SAESHIN, and NSK group) and 9 for each group. The screws were fastened at the implant fixture by three electronic torque drivers using the tightening torques recommended by the manufacturers of the drivers. After 10 minutes, the screws were again fastened at the implant fixture with equal torque. Then, the loosening torques were measured with an MGT12 torque gauge (MARK-10, Inc.). This measurement procedure was repeated 10 times under loosening torques of 15 Ncm, 25 Ncm, and 35 Ncm. In the statistical analysis, all values of loosening torque were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis test (α=.05) for comparative evaluation.RESULTS: There were significant inter-group differences at loosening torques of 15 Ncm and 25 Ncm (P<.05). The accuracy of the NSK driver was the highest, followed by SAESHIN and W&H. There was no significant difference between NSK and W&H at 35 Ncm (P>.05). The SAESHIN driver showed the closest loosening torque at 35 Ncm.CONCLUSION: The most accurate loosening torques were SAESHIN at 35 Ncm, and NSK at 15 Ncm and 25 Ncm. Since the loosening torque may vary depending on the tightening torques and electronic torque drivers, periodic calibration of the electronic torque driver is recommended.


Subject(s)
Calibration , Torque
16.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-761439

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to verify the effect of the abutment superimposition process on the final virtual model in the scanning process of single and 3-units bridge model using a dental model scanner. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A gypsum model for single and 3-unit bridges was manufactured for evaluating. And working casts with removable dies were made using Pindex system. A dental model scanner (3Shape E1 scanner) was used to obtain CAD reference model (CRM) and CAD test model (CTM). The CRM was scanned without removing after dividing the abutments in the working cast. Then, CTM was scanned with separated from the divided abutments and superimposed on the CRM (n=20). Finally, three-dimensional analysis software (Geomagic control X) was used to analyze the root mean square (RMS) and Mann-Whitney U test was used for statistical analysis (α=.05). RESULTS: The RMS mean abutment for single full crown preparation was 10.93 µm and the RMS average abutment for 3 unit bridge preparation was 6.9 µm. The RMS mean of the two groups showed statistically significant differences (P<.001). In addition, errors of positive and negative of two groups averaged 9.83 µm, −6.79 µm and 3-units bridge abutment 6.22 µm, −3.3 µm, respectively. The mean values of the errors of positive and negative of two groups were all statistically significantly lower in 3-unit bridge abutments (P<.001). CONCLUSION: Although the number of abutments increased during the scan process of the working cast with removable dies, the error due to the superimposition of abutments did not increase. There was also a significantly higher error in single abutments, but within the range of clinically acceptable scan accuracy.


Subject(s)
Calcium Sulfate , Crowns , Models, Dental
17.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-914922

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE@#The purpose of this study was to compare the degree of tooth preparation abilities of students according to three self-assessment methods.@*MATERIALS AND METHODS@#forty-eight sophomores in Kyungpook National University College of Dentistry were divided into three experimental groups. Students performed tooth preparation of the left mandibular first molar for full gold crown. They performed self-assessment using the three methods (visual, digital, and putty index self-assessment group), and reperformed tooth preparation. An intraoral scanner was used to scan each tooth model (prepared tooth and unprepared tooth), and data were acquired in standard tessellation language (STL) file format. The STL files of prepared tooth and unprepared tooth were superimposed using the 3-dimensional analysis software (Geomagic control X). And the reduction amount was measured. In the statistical analysis, all values of reduction amount were analyzed with the Wilcoxon signed rank test and Kruskal-Wallis test (α = 0.05).@*RESULTS@#The three self-assessment methods showed statistically significant differences (P < 0.001). The putty index self-assessment group showed the highest reduction in error than the digital self-assessment method.@*CONCLUSION@#Within limitations of this study, students showed significant differences in improvement of tooth preparation ability according to the three self-evaluation methods.

18.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-742109

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of three types of intraoral scanners and the accuracy of the single abutment and bridge abutment model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this study, a single abutment, and a bridge abutment with missing first molar was fabricated and set as the reference model. The reference model was scanned with an industrial three-dimensional scanner and set as reference scan data. The reference model was scanned five times using the three intraoral scanners (CS3600, CS3500, and EZIS PO). This was set as the evaluation scan data. In the three-dimensional analysis (Geomagic control X), the divided abutment region was selected and analyzed to verify the scan accuracy of the abutment. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software (α = .05). The accuracy of intraoral scanners was compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test and post-test was performed using the Pairwise test. The accuracy difference between the single abutment model and the bridge abutment model was analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U test. RESULTS: The accuracy according to the intraoral scanner was significantly different (P < .05). The trueness of the single abutment model and the bridge abutment model showed a statistically significant difference and showed better trueness in the single abutment (P < .05). There was no significant difference in the precision (P = .616). CONCLUSION: As a result of comparing the accuracy of single and bridge abutments, the error of abutment scan increased with increasing scan area, and the accuracy of bridge abutment model was clinically acceptable in three types of intraoral scanners.


Subject(s)
In Vitro Techniques , Molar
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-742053

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Cement-retained implant prostheses can lack proper retrievability during repair, and residual cement can cause peri-implantitis. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of abutment height and convergence angle on the retrievability of cement-retained implant prostheses with lingual slots, known as retrievable cement-type slots (RCS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We fabricated six types of titanium abutments (10 of each type) with two different heights (4 mm and 6 mm), three different convergence angles (8°, 10°, and 12°), a sloped shoulder margin (0.6 mm depth), a rectangular shape (6 mm × 6.5 mm) with rounded edges, and a rectangular ledge (2 mm × 1 mm) for the RCS. One monolithic zirconia crown was fabricated for each abutment using a dental computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing system. The abutments and crowns were permanently cemented together with dual-curing resin cement, followed by 24 hours in demineralized water at room temperature. Using a custom-made device with a slot driver and torque gauge, we recorded the torque (N·cm) required to remove the crowns. Statistical analysis was conducted using multiple regression analysis and Mann-Whitney U tests (α=.05). RESULTS: Removal torques significantly decreased as convergence angles increased. Multiple regression analysis showed no significant interaction between the abutment height and the convergence angle (Durbin-Watson ratio: 2.186). CONCLUSION: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, we suggest that the retrievability of cement-retained implant prostheses with RCS can be maintained by adjusting the abutment height and convergence angle, even when they are permanently cemented together.


Subject(s)
Crowns , In Vitro Techniques , Peri-Implantitis , Prostheses and Implants , Resin Cements , Shoulder , Titanium , Torque , Water
20.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-742052

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To measure axial displacement of different implant-abutment connection types and materials during screw tightening at the recommended torque by using a contact scanner for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) analyses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty models of missing mandibular left second premolars were 3D-printed and implant fixtures were placed at the same position by using a surgical guide. External and internal fixtures were used. Three implant-abutment internal connection (INT) types and one implant-abutment external connection (EXT) type were prepared. Two of the INT types used titanium abutment and zirconia abutment; the other INT type was a customized abutment, fabricated by using a computer-controlled milling machine. The EXT type used titanium abutment. Screws were tightened at 10 N·cm, simulating hand tightening, and then at the manufacturers' recommended torque (30 N·cm) 10 min later. Abutments and adjacent teeth were subsequently scanned with a contact scanner for 2D and 3D analyses using a 3D inspection software. RESULTS: Significant differences were observed in axial displacement according to the type of implant-abutment connection (P < .001). Vertical displacement of abutments was greater than overall displacement, and significant differences in vertical and overall displacement were observed among the four connection types (P < .05). CONCLUSION: Displacement according to connection type and material should be considered in choosing an implant abutment. When adjusting a prosthesis, tightening the screw at the manufacturers' recommended torque is advisable, rather than the level of hand tightening.


Subject(s)
Bicuspid , Dental Implant-Abutment Design , Dental Implants , Hand , In Vitro Techniques , Prostheses and Implants , Titanium , Tooth , Torque
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