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1.
The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine ; : 620-640, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-1003066

ABSTRACT

We aimed to develop evidence-based recommendations for treating axial spondylarthritis (axSpA) in Korea. The development committee was constructed, key clinical questions were determined, and the evidence was searched through online databases including MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane, KoreaMed, and Kmbase. Systematic literature reviews were conducted, quality of evidence was determined, and draft recommendations were formulated according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluations methodology. Recommendations that reached 80% consensus among a voting panel were finalized. Three principles and 21 recommendations were determined. Recommendations 1 and 2 pertain to treatment strategies, regular disease status assessment, and rheumatologist-steered multidisciplinary management. Recommendations 3 and 4 strongly recommend patient education, exercise, and smoking cessation. Recommendations 5–12 address pharmacological treatment of active disease using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, glucocorticoids, sulfasalazine, biologics, and Janus kinase inhibitors. Recommendations 13–16 address treatment in stable disease. We suggest against spa and acupuncture as therapies (Recommendation 17). Recommendations 18 and 19 pertain to total hip arthroplasty and spinal surgery. Monitoring of comorbidities and drug toxicities are recommended (Recommendations 20 and 21). Recommendations for axSpA treatment in a Korean context were developed based on comprehensive clinical questions and evidence. These are intended to guide best practice in the treatment of axSpA.

2.
Journal of Rheumatic Diseases ; : 151-169, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-1001531

ABSTRACT

We aimed to develop evidence-based recommendations for treating axial spondylarthritis (axSpA) in Korea. The development committee was constructed, key clinical questions were determined, and the evidence was searched through online databases including MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane, KoreaMed, and KMbase. Systematic literature reviews were conducted, quality of evidence was determined, and draft recommendations were formulated according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluations methodology. Recommendations that reached 80% consensus among a voting panel were finalized. Three principles and 21 recommendations were determined. Recommendations 1 and 2 pertain to treatment strategies, regular disease status assessment, and rheumatologist-steered multidisciplinary management. Recommendations 3 and 4 strongly recommend patient education, exercise, and smoking cessation. Recommendations 5~12 address pharmacological treatment of active disease using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, glucocorticoids, sulfasalazine, biologics, and Janus kinase inhibitors.Recommendations 13~16 address treatment in stable disease. We suggest against spa and acupuncture as therapies (Recommendation 17). Recommendations 18 and 19 pertain to total hip arthroplasty and spinal surgery. Monitoring of comorbidities and drug toxicities are recommended (Recommendations 20 and 21). Recommendations for axSpA treatment in a Korean context were developed based on comprehensive clinical questions and evidence. These are intended to guide best practice in the treatment of axSpA.

3.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : e266-2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-1001225

ABSTRACT

Background@#The Gout Impact Scale (GIS), part of the Gout Assessment Questionnaire 2.0, measures gout-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL). This study aimed to translate the GIS into Korean and validate the Korean version (K-GIS) using generic HRQOL measures. @*Methods@#The GIS was translated into Korean and back-translated into English. We asked patients aged 18 years or older who met the 2015 gout classification criteria to fill out the questionnaires (from January 2022 to June 2022); the K-GIS (5 scales [0–100 scores each]), along with the Korean version of Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and EuroQol-5 dimension (EQ-5D). We investigated the internal consistency, construct validity, and discriminative validity for gout characteristics of K-GIS. The K-GIS form was administrated to patients 4 weeks later to assess the test-retest reliability using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). @*Results@#One hundred patients completed the questionnaire. The mean ± standard deviation age of the patients was 53.0 ± 15.1 years, and 99.0% of the patients were men. All scales had high degree of internal consistency (Cronbach’s α = 0.59 to 0.96) and test-retest reliability (n = 18, ICC = 0.83 to 0.94, all P 6 mg/dL, frequent gout flares in the past year, and fewer comorbidities. In contrast, neither the HAQ nor the EQ-5D could discern these subsets of patients. @*Conclusion@#The K-GIS is a reliable and valid HRQOL measure for patients with gout. Higher K-GIS scores were associated with clinical characteristics leading to unfavorable outcomes, which were not demonstrated by the HAQ and EQ-5D.

4.
Journal of Rheumatic Diseases ; : 26-35, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-967690

ABSTRACT

Objective@#To evaluate treatment patterns and healthcare resource utilization (HCRU) after initiating biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) in Korean patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). @*Methods@#Patients newly diagnosed with RA in 2014 were identified and followed up on using the Korean National Health Insurance Database until 2018. The initial line of therapy (LOT) or LOT1 included patients treated with conventional DMARDs (cDMARD). Patients who started a bDMARD were assigned to LOT2 bDMARD. Those who moved from a bDMARD to a Janus kinase inhibitor were assigned to LOT3. Analyzed outcomes were treatment patterns and HCRU in LOT2 bDMARD. @*Results@#The most prescribed initial bDMARD was a tumor necrosis factor inhibitor. Seventy-five percent of patients had changes in treatment after starting a bDMARD, such as addition/removal or switch of a DMARD, and transition to LOT3. For the first and second changes in LOT2 bDMARD, adding a cDMARD to a bDMARD was more common than switching to another bDMARD (7.98% vs. 2.93% for the first change, and 17.10% vs. 6.51% for the second change). Tocilizumab was the most common bDMARD that was switched to. Forty-eight percent of patients had at least one hospitalization after initiating bDMARDs. Of these patients, 64.3% were admitted due to RA-related reasons. @*Conclusion@#This real-world study provides information on treatment characteristics of RA patients in Korea after starting a bDMARD. In contrary to guidelines, cDMARD addition was more often than bDMARD switches in daily clinical practice.

5.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : e253-2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-938034

ABSTRACT

Background@#Clinical characteristics and manifestations of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) have been extensively studied in western countries, yet data of Korean patients with PsA are very limited. We aimed to investigate the clinical traits of patients with PsA and dissect the characteristics of those with axial involvement. @*Methods@#In this observational study, we analyzed clinical data of 109 patients with PsA who were enrolled in the Korean College of Rheumatology Biologics and Targeted Therapy registry between December 2012 and March 2022 at the time point of initiating or switching to a biologic agent. Data from 2,221 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) registered during the same period were also analyzed. We divided patients with PsA into patients with or without axial involvement and then added AS patients with psoriasis (total three subgroups) for comparative analyses. @*Results@#Asymmetric oligoarthritis was the most common clinical manifestation in patients with PsA, followed by symmetric polyarthritis and spondylitis. Our analysis indicated that methotrexate and sulfasalazine were the two most prescribed disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs for patients with PsA before starting biologic therapy. The patients with psoriatic spondylitis had more peripheral joint involvement (P = 0.016), less prior uveitis (P < 0.001), and lower human leukocyte antigen B27 (HLA-B27) positivity (P < 0.001) than the AS patients with psoriasis. Furthermore, syndesmophytes and radiographic sacroiliitis were prevalent among patients with PsA and AS patients with psoriasis who had the HLA-B27 gene. @*Conclusion@#Our study shows that the degree of peripheral arthritis is less severe in Korean patients with PsA who require biologics and reestablishes that psoriatic spondylitis is a common and important clinical pattern in Korean patients with PsA.

6.
Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases ; : 255-262, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-904163

ABSTRACT

Microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) is an antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)‒associated necrotizing vasculitis, which mainly affects small vessels in various organs, especially the lungs. The two key pulmonary manifestations, interstitial lung disease (ILD) and diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH), increase the morbidity and death rate of patients with MPA. ILD is more common in MPA than in other ANCA-associated vasculitis subsets and is primarily associated with myeloperoxidase-ANCA. Unlike alveolar hemorrhage due to pulmonary capillaritis, ILD can initially manifest as isolated pulmonary fibrosis. Of note, its most frequent radiographic pattern is the usual interstitial pneumonia pattern, similar to the characteristic pattern seen in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. In this review we present the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and radiographic and histopathologic features of ILD and DAH in MPA. We also briefly summarize the outcome and therapeutic options for the two conditions.

7.
Journal of Rheumatic Diseases ; : 176-182, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-900595

ABSTRACT

The KOrean College of Rheumatology BIOlogics and targeted therapy (KOBIO) registry is a nationwide observational cohort that captures detailed data on exposure of patients to biologic and targeted synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). This registry was launched in December 2012 with an aim to prospectively investigate clinical manifestations and outcomes of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriatic arthritis who initiated a biologic or targeted synthetic DMARD or switched to another. Demographic data, disease activity, current treatment, adverse events, terms based on Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities, and so on are registered for patients who are then followed up annually in a web-based unified platform. The KOBIO registry also recruits and collects data of patients with RA on conventional DMARDs for comparison. As of today, more than 5,500 patients were enrolled from 47 academic and community Rheumatology centers across Korea. The KOBIO registry has evolved to become a powerful database for clinical research to improve clinical outcomes and quality of treatment.

8.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : e95-2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-899972

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused more than 100 million infections and 2 million deaths worldwide. In up to 20% of cases, COVID-19 infection can take a severe, life-threatening course. Therefore, preventive measures such as mask-wearing, hand hygiene, and social distancing are important. COVID-19 vaccines that use novel vaccine technology can prevent up to 95% of infections. However, the uncertainty regarding the efficacy and safety of vaccination in patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic disease (AIIRD), who are immunocompromised due to underlying immune dysfunction and concomitant immunosuppressive treatment, warrants clear guidance. A task force of the Korean College of Rheumatology formulated a set of vaccination guidance based on the currently available data and expert consensus. The currently available COVID-19 vaccines are considered to be safe and effective. Every patient with AIIRD should receive one of the available COVID-19 vaccines unless contraindicated for medical reasons such as prior allergy/anaphylaxis to the COVID-19 vaccine or its components. Patients should continue immunosuppressive treatment for their underlying AIIRD, including biological and targeted synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (b/tsDMARDs). Corticosteroids should be reduced to the lowest dose possible without aggravating the AIIRD. To improve the vaccine response, methotrexate can be withheld for 1–2 weeks after each vaccination, and the timing of rituximab and abatacept infusion should be adjusted if clinically acceptable.Rheumatologists should play a leading role in educating and vaccinating patients with AIIRD.

9.
Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases ; : 255-262, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-896459

ABSTRACT

Microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) is an antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)‒associated necrotizing vasculitis, which mainly affects small vessels in various organs, especially the lungs. The two key pulmonary manifestations, interstitial lung disease (ILD) and diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH), increase the morbidity and death rate of patients with MPA. ILD is more common in MPA than in other ANCA-associated vasculitis subsets and is primarily associated with myeloperoxidase-ANCA. Unlike alveolar hemorrhage due to pulmonary capillaritis, ILD can initially manifest as isolated pulmonary fibrosis. Of note, its most frequent radiographic pattern is the usual interstitial pneumonia pattern, similar to the characteristic pattern seen in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. In this review we present the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and radiographic and histopathologic features of ILD and DAH in MPA. We also briefly summarize the outcome and therapeutic options for the two conditions.

10.
Journal of Rheumatic Diseases ; : 176-182, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-892891

ABSTRACT

The KOrean College of Rheumatology BIOlogics and targeted therapy (KOBIO) registry is a nationwide observational cohort that captures detailed data on exposure of patients to biologic and targeted synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). This registry was launched in December 2012 with an aim to prospectively investigate clinical manifestations and outcomes of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriatic arthritis who initiated a biologic or targeted synthetic DMARD or switched to another. Demographic data, disease activity, current treatment, adverse events, terms based on Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities, and so on are registered for patients who are then followed up annually in a web-based unified platform. The KOBIO registry also recruits and collects data of patients with RA on conventional DMARDs for comparison. As of today, more than 5,500 patients were enrolled from 47 academic and community Rheumatology centers across Korea. The KOBIO registry has evolved to become a powerful database for clinical research to improve clinical outcomes and quality of treatment.

11.
Journal of Rheumatic Diseases ; : 101-106, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-874919

ABSTRACT

Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2B (LGMD2B) presents with proximal and/or distal muscle weakness and markedly high creatine kinase level. It is caused by the loss of dysferlin due to mutations in the DYSF gene. Due to its similar clinical features as inflammatory myopathy, it is often difficult to distinguish between the two. We present a case of a 48-year-old male who developed progressive proximal muscle weakness, papulosquamous lesions on the knuckles, elevated levels of muscle enzymes, and electromyogram abnormalities. Based on the clinical presentation, the initial impression was dermatomyositis, yet it was refractory to immunosuppressive therapy. Subsequently, dysferlin immunostaining and genetic analysis led to the final diagnosis of LGMD2B. This case shows that LGMD2B can present with extramuscular symptoms mimicking inflammatory myopathy in later stages of life. Dysferlin immunostaining and/or genetic analysis of the DYSF gene are essential for its diagnosis.

12.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : e95-2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-892268

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused more than 100 million infections and 2 million deaths worldwide. In up to 20% of cases, COVID-19 infection can take a severe, life-threatening course. Therefore, preventive measures such as mask-wearing, hand hygiene, and social distancing are important. COVID-19 vaccines that use novel vaccine technology can prevent up to 95% of infections. However, the uncertainty regarding the efficacy and safety of vaccination in patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic disease (AIIRD), who are immunocompromised due to underlying immune dysfunction and concomitant immunosuppressive treatment, warrants clear guidance. A task force of the Korean College of Rheumatology formulated a set of vaccination guidance based on the currently available data and expert consensus. The currently available COVID-19 vaccines are considered to be safe and effective. Every patient with AIIRD should receive one of the available COVID-19 vaccines unless contraindicated for medical reasons such as prior allergy/anaphylaxis to the COVID-19 vaccine or its components. Patients should continue immunosuppressive treatment for their underlying AIIRD, including biological and targeted synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (b/tsDMARDs). Corticosteroids should be reduced to the lowest dose possible without aggravating the AIIRD. To improve the vaccine response, methotrexate can be withheld for 1–2 weeks after each vaccination, and the timing of rituximab and abatacept infusion should be adjusted if clinically acceptable.Rheumatologists should play a leading role in educating and vaccinating patients with AIIRD.

13.
The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine ; : 231-239, 2020.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-831772

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study was to compare changes in the simplified disease activity index (SDAI) between biologic (b) and conventional (c) disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) users with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in daily clinical practice. Methods: This was a nationwide multicenter observational study. Patients who had three or more active joint counts and abnormal inf lammatory marker in blood test were enrolled. The selection of DMARDs was determined by the attending rheumatologist. Clinical parameters, laboratory findings, and Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) scores were obtained at baseline and at 6 and 12 months. Serial SDAI changes and clinical remission rate at 6 and 12 months were assessed. Results: A total of 850 patients participated in this study. The mean baseline SDAI score in bDMARD group was higher than that in cDMARD group (32.08 ± 12.98 vs 25.69 ± 10.97, p < 0.0001). Mean change of SDAI at 12 months was –19.0 in the bDMARD group and –12.6 in the cDMARD group (p < 0.0001). Clinical remission rates at 12 months in bDMARD and cDMARD groups were 15.4% and 14.6%, respectively. Patient global assessment and HAQ at 12 months were also significantly improved in both groups. Multivariate logistic regression showed that baseline HAQ score was the most notable factor associated with remission. Conclusions: There was a significant reduction in SDAI within 12 months after receiving DMARDs in Korean seropositive RA patients irrespective of bDMARD or cDMARD use in real-world practice. Clinical remission was achieved in those with lower baseline HAQ scores.

14.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : e155-2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-764996

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We aimed to assess the performance of the 2015 American College of Rheumatology (ACR)/European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) classification criteria for gout in Korean patients with acute arthritis and to compare the performance of the ACR/EULAR criteria to that of other sets of criteria for gout classification. METHODS: Patients with acute arthritis who underwent diagnostic arthrocentesis at one of the four participating rheumatology clinics were consecutively enrolled between February and December 2017. Crystal-proven gout was diagnosed upon confirming the presence of monosodium urate (MSU) crystals in patients with a clinical impression of gout as judged by the rheumatologist. The performance of the ACR/EULAR and other gout classification criteria, including the Rome, New York, American Rheumatism Association (ARA), Mexico, and Netherlands criteria, was analyzed regardless of the presence/absence of MSU crystals. RESULTS: The study enrolled 118 gout patients (all crystal-proven) and 95 non-gout patients. According to the area under the curve, the diagnostic performance was the highest for the ACR/EULAR classification criteria (sensitivity, 80.5%; specificity, 95.8%; area under the curve, 0.966), followed by the Netherlands, Rome, ARA, New York, and Mexico criteria. All six sets of criteria demonstrated lower sensitivity in patients exhibiting the first episode of acute arthritis. CONCLUSION: In Korean patients with acute arthritis, the ACR/EULAR classification criteria outperformed other sets of gout classification criteria even in the absence of information regarding the presence of MSU crystals. However, to enhance diagnostic sensitivity, synovial fluid analysis should be considered in patients with the first episode of acute arthritis.


Subject(s)
Humans , Arthritis , Arthrocentesis , Classification , Gout , Mexico , Netherlands , Rheumatic Diseases , Rheumatology , Sensitivity and Specificity , Synovial Fluid , Uric Acid
15.
Journal of Rheumatic Diseases ; : 108-115, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-713818

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Coexisting chronic hepatitis C can be problematic when treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study examined the changes in the transaminase and viral load in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected RA patients after initiating biologic agents. METHODS: A multicenter retrospective study was conducted at 12 University Hospitals in Korea between November 2014 and November 2015, and 78 RA patients, who met the 2010 American College of Rheumatology and European League Against Rheumatism classification criteria for RA and were concomitantly infected with HCV, were identified. The baseline and longitudinal clinical data, changes in liver function, and viral RNA titers were evaluated. RESULTS: Seventeen (21.8%) patients were treated with biologic agents, including etanercept (n=8), adalimumab (n=8), infliximab (n=2), tocilizumab (n=2), abatacept (n=1), and golimumab (n=1) (median 1.5 patient-years). Four patients experienced marked increases in transaminase during treatment with adalimumab (n=2) and tocilizumab (n=2). Two patients (one using adalimumab, the other using tocilizumab) were treated with anti-viral agents and showed dramatic improvement in both the viral RNA and transaminase. One patient discontinued adalimumab due to the repeated elevated transaminase levels along with a twofold increase in the viral RNA titer, and the transaminase level subsequently normalized. No case of overt viral reactivation was identified. CONCLUSION: The data support that changes in transaminase and/or viral load associated with biologic agents in HCV-infected RA patients are possible. Therefore, the liver function and viral RNA titer should be followed regularly during biologic therapy.


Subject(s)
Humans , Abatacept , Adalimumab , Antirheumatic Agents , Arthritis, Rheumatoid , Biological Factors , Biological Therapy , Classification , Etanercept , Hepacivirus , Hepatitis C , Hepatitis C, Chronic , Hepatitis, Chronic , Hospitals, University , Infliximab , Korea , Liver , Retrospective Studies , Rheumatic Diseases , Rheumatology , RNA, Viral , Viral Load
16.
The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine ; : 1081-1083, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-718187

ABSTRACT

No abstract available.

17.
Diabetes & Metabolism Journal ; : 28-42, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-739784

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In Korea, the costs associated with self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) under insulin treatment have been reimbursed since November 2015. We investigated whether this new reimbursement program for SMBG has improved the glycemic control in the beneficiaries of this policy. METHODS: Among all adult T2DM patients with ≥3 months of reimbursement (n=854), subjects without any changes in anti-hyperglycemic agents during the study period were selected. The improvement of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was defined as an absolute reduction in HbA1c ≥0.6% or an HbA1c level at follow-up < 7%. RESULTS: HbA1c levels significantly decreased from 8.5%±1.3% to 8.2%±1.2% during the follow-up (P < 0.001) in all the study subjects (n=409). Among them, 35.5% (n=145) showed a significant improvement in HbA1c. Subjects covered under the Medical Aid system showed a higher prevalence of improvement in HbA1c than those with medical insurance (52.2% vs. 33.3%, respectively, P=0.012). In the improvement group, the baseline HbA1c (P < 0.001), fasting C-peptide (P=0.016), and daily dose of insulin/body weight (P=0.024) showed significant negative correlations with the degree of HbA1c change. Multivariate analysis showed that subjects in the Medical Aid system were about 2.5-fold more likely to improve in HbA1c compared to those with medical insurance (odds ratio, 2.459; 95% confidence interval, 1.138 to 5.314; P=0.022). CONCLUSION: The reimbursement for SMBG resulted in a significant improvement in HbA1c in T2DM subjects using insulin, which was more prominent in subjects with poor glucose control at baseline or covered under the Medical Aid system.


Subject(s)
Adult , Humans , Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring , Blood Glucose , C-Peptide , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Fasting , Follow-Up Studies , Glucose , Glycated Hemoglobin , Insulin , Insurance , Insurance, Health, Reimbursement , Korea , Multivariate Analysis , Prevalence
18.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : 1967-1973, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-159413

ABSTRACT

Gout attacks are often accompanied by systemic inflammatory response. The aim of the retrospective study was to compare gout patients in different age groups in terms of their clinical features at gout attacks. Patients, who were treated for gout attack in two tertiary medical centers between January 2000 and April 2014, were divided into young (≤ 50 years), middle-aged, and elderly (> 65 years) groups. Patients in three age groups were compared in terms of presence of fever (> 37.8°C), C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, and erythrocyte sedimentation ratio (ESR) at the gout attacks. Monocytes, which were isolated from 10 consecutive patients who previously experienced gout attacks, were stimulated with monosodium urate (MSU) crystals and cytokine production was measured by flow cytometry. Among 254 patients analyzed in this study, 48 were young, 65 were middle-aged, and 141 were elderly. The elderly patients were more likely to have fever (51.1%) during the attack than the young (20.8%) and middle-aged (30.8%) patients (P < 0.001 by χ² test). They were also more likely to have higher ESR and CRP levels than the young patients (P = 0.002 for ESR, P < 0.001 for CRP). Patients' age correlated significantly with CRP and ESR levels (both P < 0.001). After stimulation with MSU, the production of interleukin-1β by monocytes increased with patients' age (r = 0.670, P = 0.03). In conclusion, gout attacks in elderly patients are associated with fever and higher ESR and CRP levels, often resembling a septic arthritis.


Subject(s)
Aged , Humans , Aging , Arthritis, Infectious , Blood Sedimentation , C-Reactive Protein , Fever , Flow Cytometry , Gout , Inflammation , Monocytes , Retrospective Studies , Uric Acid
19.
Journal of Rheumatic Diseases ; : 169-170, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-222869

ABSTRACT

No abstract available.


Subject(s)
Humans , Arthritis, Rheumatoid
20.
Journal of Rheumatic Diseases ; : 35-42, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-160552

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Osteoporosis (OP) is one of the principal comorbidities in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Proper nutrition for these patients is required not only to improve bone health but to better manage their chronic illness. Thus, our aim was to assess the status of key nutrient intake in postmenopausal RA women with OP. METHODS: Using cross-sectional data of 4,933 postmenopausal women in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (K-NHANES IV, V) conducted between 2008 and 2011, we investigated the daily nutrient intake in RA subjects and their bone mineral density (BMD). We examined the association of nutrient intake and BMD after adjusting age, level of education, body mass index, family history, alcohol use, and total calorie intake in the osteoporosis, osteopenia, and normal BMD group using multivariable linear regression. RESULTS: We included 222 RA women and 320 controls whose BMD and T-score data were available. Low calcium and phosphorous intake were associated with reduced BMD T-scores in postmenopausal RA women. Additionally, β-carotene, potassium, riboflavin, and vitamin C intake were significantly lower in RA women with OP. Multivariable linear regression analysis showed a strong positive association of intake of β-carotene, potassium, riboflavin, and calcium with higher T-scores at the lumbar spine, femur neck, and total hip (all p<0.0001, respectively). CONCLUSION: We found insufficient intake of nutrients such as β-carotene, potassium, riboflavin, and vitamin C in Korean postmenopausal RA women with low BMD. Dietary counseling and recommendations are warranted for these subjects to attain better bone health.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Arthritis, Rheumatoid , Ascorbic Acid , Body Mass Index , Bone Density , Bone Diseases, Metabolic , Calcium , Chronic Disease , Comorbidity , Counseling , Education , Femur Neck , Hip , Linear Models , Nutrition Surveys , Osteoporosis , Potassium , Riboflavin , Spine
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