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1.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 333-339, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-1000053

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Intragastric balloon (IGB) is the only available endoscopic bariatric and metabolic therapy in Korea. End-ball (Endalis) has the longest history of clinical use among the IGBs available in Korea. However, little clinical data on this system have been reported. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of End-ball in Korea. @*Methods@#We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent IGB insertion (End-ball) from 2013 to 2019. Demographic and anthropometric data were collected. The efficacy and safety of IGB treatment were analyzed. @*Results@#In total, 80 patients were included. Mean age was 33.7 years and 83.8% were female. Initial body mass index was 34.48±4.69 kg/m2. Body mass index reduction was 3.72±2.63 kg/m2 at the time of IGB removal. Percent of total body weight loss (%TBWL) was 10.76%±6.76%. Percentage excess body weight loss was 43.67%±27.59%. Most adverse events were minor, and 71.4% of participants showed nausea, vomiting, or abdominal pain. @*Conclusions@#IGB treatment showed good efficacy and safety profile in Korean patients with obesity. In terms of %TBWL and percentage excess body weight loss, the efficacy was similar to that in the Western population.

2.
The Korean Journal of Hepatology ; : 261-267, 2011.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-58541

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: We investigated the durability of the biochemical and virologic responses after adefovir (ADV) discontinuation in lamivudine-resistant (LMV-R) chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients, and the outcomes of ADV discontinuation compared to that of ADV maintenance. METHODS: The indication for ADV treatment cessation was an undetectable level of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA documented on two occasions at least 6 months apart. All patients received additional ADV for at least 12 months after the confirmation of undetectable HBV DNA (Cobas TaqMan PCR assay, <70 copies/mL). Of 36 patients who had a sufficient ADV therapeutic effect, 19 discontinued ADV treatment, while the others maintained it. A virologic rebound was arbitrarily defined as the redetection of HBV DNA at a level higher than 105 copies/mL. RESULTS: In the ADV discontinuation group, ADV treatment and additional therapy were administered for medians of 33 months (range, 12-47 months) and 18 months, respectively. The patients were followed for a median of 12 months (range, 3-30 months) after ADV cessation. During that period, 18 of 19 patients (95%) experienced viral relapse. Viral rebound was observed in six patients (32%). However, 12 of 18 patients (67%) exhibited serum HBV DNA levels of less than 105 copies/mL. Biochemical relapses were observed in four of the six patients with viral rebound. In the ADV maintenance group, patients were treated for a median of 53 months (range, 31-85 months), and 9 patients (53%) experienced viral breakthrough. CONCLUSIONS: During short-term follow-up after ADV discontinuation, most patients (95%) exhibited viral relapse, whereas and viral breakthrough occurred in about half of patients (53%) maintained on ADV therapy. Therefore, the durability of virologic response after ADV discontinuation in LMV-R patients was unsatisfactory. In addition, and viral breakthrough was not infrequent in the ADV continuation group.


Subject(s)
Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Adenine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , DNA, Viral/analysis , Drug Resistance, Viral , Follow-Up Studies , Hepatitis B, Chronic/drug therapy , Lamivudine/therapeutic use , Phosphorous Acids/therapeutic use , Recurrence , Risk Factors
3.
Gut and Liver ; : 340-347, 2011.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-205661

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: The findings of several recent studies suggest that antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) are frequently detected in patients with acute hepatitis A (AHA). However, the clinical significance of a positive ANA test remains uncertain. This study was performed to evaluate the clinical significance of ANAs in AHA patients. METHODS: All patients admitted with AHA were consecutively enrolled in this study. An ANA assay was performed by indirect immunofluorescence during hospitalization. ANA positivity was defined as an ANA titer > or =1:80. The peak international normalized ratio (INR), peak alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and peak bilirubin levels were assessed over the duration of the hospitalization, and the incidence of AHA complications was evaluated. RESULTS: A total of 422 patients were enrolled in this study (age, 31+/-7 years), of which 260 (61.6%) were men. ANAs were detected in 179 AHA patients (42.4%). The proportion of ANA-positive patients varied significantly with AHA status on the day of the ANA assay (4.7% during the prodromal period vs 52.1% during the icteric or recovery period, p<0.001) and sex (56.2% in women vs 33.8% in men, p<0.001). The ANAs became undetectable in all ANA-positive patients within 3 months. The incidence of complications, including mortality, fulminant hepatic failure, renal dysfunction, relapse, and cholestatic hepatitis, did not differ significantly between ANA-positive and ANA-negative patients. CONCLUSIONS: ANAs were detected frequently and transiently in patients with AHA, especially after their peak-ALT day. The presence of ANAs may not be associated with the clinical outcome of AHA, but simply with AHA status on the ANA assay day.


Subject(s)
Female , Humans , Male , Alanine Transaminase , Antibodies, Antinuclear , Bilirubin , Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect , Hepatitis , Hepatitis A , Hospitalization , Incidence , International Normalized Ratio , Liver Failure, Acute , Prodromal Symptoms , Recurrence
4.
Gut and Liver ; : 551-555, 2010.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-37188

ABSTRACT

Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) is a metabolic disorder that results in a decrease in uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase activity. It is characterized by photosensitivity, bullae formation, and skin pigmentation. There are four types of PCT: acquired, familial, toxic, and hepatoerythropoietic. Uroporphyrin levels are elevated in the urine of PCT patients. PCT can be differentiated from other porphyrias by its clinical characteristics and the porphyrin levels in the serum, erythrocytes, urine, and feces. This metabolic disorder can lead to liver dysfunction as well as histological changes such as fatty infiltration or hepatic fibrosis. PCT rarely manifests as liver cirrhosis. We report herein a case of PCT-induced liver cirrhosis that progressed to hepatic failure.


Subject(s)
Humans , Blister , Erythrocytes , Feces , Fibrosis , Liver , Liver Cirrhosis , Liver Diseases , Liver Failure , Porphyria Cutanea Tarda , Porphyrias , Skin Pigmentation , Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase
5.
The Korean Journal of Hepatology ; : 517-523, 2009.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-161887

ABSTRACT

Herbs are widely used as treatments for various symptoms. However, several herbs have been reported to be inducers of liver injury. We report herein a case of hepatotoxicity induced by Corydalis speciosa Max. A 37-year-old male complained of jaundice and mild abdominal discomfort. A thorough history was taken, and laboratory investigation, diagnostic imaging studies, and percutaneous liver biopsy sampling were conducted to determine the cause of liver injury. An accurate cause was not revealed. We administered supportive management for acute cholestatic hepatitis of unknown origin, after which his symptoms disappeared and serum aminotransferase levels decreased gradually to near normal levels. However, at 2 months after discharge, the symptoms and the elevation of aminotransferase levels recurred. At that time he told us that he had repeatedly but unintentionally eaten a herb called "Hwang-geun cho"(Corydalis speciosa Max.). Thus, we diagnosed his case as herbal hepatotoxicity.


Subject(s)
Adult , Humans , Male , Acute Disease , Alanine Transaminase/blood , Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , Bilirubin/blood , Corydalis/chemistry , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/diagnosis , Plant Extracts/toxicity , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
6.
Intestinal Research ; : 93-99, 2009.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-132465

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: C-reactive protein (CRP) is a general marker of inflammation and increased CRP level is reported in several cancers. It has been reported that CRP is an independent factor predicting survival in colorectal cancer patients, although this claim is still under debate. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between CRP and the characteristics of colorectal cancer patients. METHODS: One hundred eighty-four patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer between January 2007 and January 2009 were included. The patients with active infectious diseases, other tumors, cardiovascular disease, or inflammatory bowel disease were excluded. The CRP levels of colorectal cancer patients were compared with the control group comprised of 175 healthy adults with a normal colonoscopy. RESULTS: The median CRP in the colorectal cancer patients (3.36 mg/L) was higher than the control group (0.48 mg/L). There was a significant correlation between CRP and the stage of colorectal cancer (p<0.001). CRP was increased significantly in Dukes' stage D. CRP had a significant correlations with the CEA and CA 19-9 levels, the ESR, and the white blood cell count, and an inverse correlation with albumin. The CRP level in colon cancer patients was higher than rectal cancer patients (p=0.032). There were no significant difference in the CRP according to metastatic sites, such as the liver and peritoneum. CONCLUSIONS: Serum CRP levels were higher in patients with colorectal cancer and high CRP level is a predictor of advanced disease.


Subject(s)
Adult , Humans , C-Reactive Protein , Cardiovascular Diseases , Colonic Neoplasms , Colonoscopy , Colorectal Neoplasms , Communicable Diseases , Inflammation , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases , Leukocyte Count , Liver , Peritoneum , Rectal Neoplasms
7.
Intestinal Research ; : 93-99, 2009.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-132461

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: C-reactive protein (CRP) is a general marker of inflammation and increased CRP level is reported in several cancers. It has been reported that CRP is an independent factor predicting survival in colorectal cancer patients, although this claim is still under debate. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between CRP and the characteristics of colorectal cancer patients. METHODS: One hundred eighty-four patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer between January 2007 and January 2009 were included. The patients with active infectious diseases, other tumors, cardiovascular disease, or inflammatory bowel disease were excluded. The CRP levels of colorectal cancer patients were compared with the control group comprised of 175 healthy adults with a normal colonoscopy. RESULTS: The median CRP in the colorectal cancer patients (3.36 mg/L) was higher than the control group (0.48 mg/L). There was a significant correlation between CRP and the stage of colorectal cancer (p<0.001). CRP was increased significantly in Dukes' stage D. CRP had a significant correlations with the CEA and CA 19-9 levels, the ESR, and the white blood cell count, and an inverse correlation with albumin. The CRP level in colon cancer patients was higher than rectal cancer patients (p=0.032). There were no significant difference in the CRP according to metastatic sites, such as the liver and peritoneum. CONCLUSIONS: Serum CRP levels were higher in patients with colorectal cancer and high CRP level is a predictor of advanced disease.


Subject(s)
Adult , Humans , C-Reactive Protein , Cardiovascular Diseases , Colonic Neoplasms , Colonoscopy , Colorectal Neoplasms , Communicable Diseases , Inflammation , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases , Leukocyte Count , Liver , Peritoneum , Rectal Neoplasms
8.
Korean Journal of Medicine ; : 264-270, 2008.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-89230

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Accurate assessment of liver fibrosis is very important for predicting the prognosis of patients with chronic liver diseases. Liver biopsy is still considered the gold-standard for assessing liver fibrosis. However, it is an invasive procedure with several limitations such as its questionable outcomes. Recent studies have suggested that liver stiffness measurement (LSM) using Fibroscan is noninvasive and useful for assessing liver fibrosis. This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of LSM for evaluating liver fibrosis in patients with chronic liver diseases. METHODS: We prospectively enrolled 93 patients with chronic liver diseases, as confirmed by liver biopsy. The patients underwent liver biopsy and LSM. The METAVIR liver fibrosis stages of the biopsy specimens were assessed by an experienced pathologist. LSM was performed by Fibroscan. The efficacy of LSM and the optimal cutoff values for assessment of the fibrosis stage were determined by a receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis. RESULTS: LSM was well correlated with the fibrosis stage (Kendall correlation coefficient: 0.58; p or =2), 0.874 (0.761-0.929) for the patients with severe fibrosis (F> or =3) and 0.894 (0.792-0.956) for the patients with cirrhosis (F=4). The optimal LSM cutoff values for F > or =2, F > or =3 and F=4 were 6.9, 11.75 and 14.5 kPa, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: LSM was a simple, effective method for assessing liver fibrosis in patients with chronic liver diseases. Its use for the follow up and management of these patients could be of great interest and so further investigation is required.


Subject(s)
Humans , Biopsy , Fibrosis , Follow-Up Studies , Liver , Liver Cirrhosis , Liver Diseases , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , ROC Curve
9.
Infection and Chemotherapy ; : 323-326, 2008.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-722093

ABSTRACT

Disseminated tuberculosis occurs through lymphohematogenous dissemination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli. The exact incidence of disseminated tuberculosis is still unknown and its diagnosis presents a challenge since the symptoms are not specific of the disease. Brain tuberculoma is one of the complications of tuberculosis. The literary review of brain tuberculoma shows that it mainly occurs in the cerebrum and cerebellum, whereas involvement of the brainstem is rare. Recently, we have experienced a case of 46-year-old man with fever of 2 months duration who was diagnosed with disseminated tuberculosis with miliary central nervous system (CNS) tuberculomas; brain tuberculomas were found even in the brainstem and the spinal cord. Pulmonary, intestinal, renal, and choroidal involvements were also noted.


Subject(s)
Humans , Middle Aged , Brain , Brain Stem , Central Nervous System , Cerebellum , Cerebrum , Choroid , Fever , Fever of Unknown Origin , Incidence , Mycobacterium tuberculosis , Spinal Cord , Tuberculoma , Tuberculosis , Tuberculosis, Miliary
10.
Infection and Chemotherapy ; : 323-326, 2008.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-721588

ABSTRACT

Disseminated tuberculosis occurs through lymphohematogenous dissemination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli. The exact incidence of disseminated tuberculosis is still unknown and its diagnosis presents a challenge since the symptoms are not specific of the disease. Brain tuberculoma is one of the complications of tuberculosis. The literary review of brain tuberculoma shows that it mainly occurs in the cerebrum and cerebellum, whereas involvement of the brainstem is rare. Recently, we have experienced a case of 46-year-old man with fever of 2 months duration who was diagnosed with disseminated tuberculosis with miliary central nervous system (CNS) tuberculomas; brain tuberculomas were found even in the brainstem and the spinal cord. Pulmonary, intestinal, renal, and choroidal involvements were also noted.


Subject(s)
Humans , Middle Aged , Brain , Brain Stem , Central Nervous System , Cerebellum , Cerebrum , Choroid , Fever , Fever of Unknown Origin , Incidence , Mycobacterium tuberculosis , Spinal Cord , Tuberculoma , Tuberculosis , Tuberculosis, Miliary
11.
Korean Journal of Nephrology ; : 631-637, 2008.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-24716

ABSTRACT

Solid organ transplant recipients are at increased risk for various opportunistic infections because of their immunocompromised state. Pneumocystis jirovecii (carinii) infection has posed serious problems in these patients which can be life threatening. It has been reported that incidences of Pneumocystis infection have dramatically decreased with the use of prophylactic antibiotics. However, there have been reports that say the risks of Pneumocystis infection are increasing with the use of new immunosuppressive drugs and in presence of preceding immunomodulating infections such as CMV infection which is another common opportunistic infection in transplant patients. There were only a few case reports abroad on Pneumocystis infection following CMV infection in patients who underwent kidney transplantation. In Korea, however, there hasnt been any report of such cases. Herein we report a case of a kidney transplant patient who experienced a serious episode of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia following CMV duodenitis. After adequate mechanical ventilation and use of antibiotics the patient completely recovered without any complications.


Subject(s)
Humans , Anti-Bacterial Agents , Cytomegalovirus , Duodenitis , Incidence , Kidney , Kidney Transplantation , Korea , Opportunistic Infections , Pneumocystis , Pneumocystis Infections , Pneumocystis carinii , Pneumonia , Respiration, Artificial , Transplants
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