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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-925748

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Primary liver cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality worldwide. However, the causes of death have not been studied in detail in patients with liver cancer. @*Methods@#The causes of death and cause-specific mortality risks in patients with primary liver cancer, diagnosed during 2000–2016, were investigated using the nationwide population-based cancer registry data in South Korea (n=231,388). The cumulative incidence function and Fine-Gray models were used to estimate the cause-specific mortality under the competing risks. Risks of non-cancer deaths relative to the general population were compared by standardized mortality ratios (SMRs). @*Results@#Among 179,921 total deaths, 92.4%, 1.7%, and 6.0% of patients died of primary liver cancer, cancer from other sites, and non-cancer illnesses, respectively. Proportionate mortality from liver cancer remained high. The 5-year competing risks probability of death from liver cancer varied by tumor stage, from 42% to 94%, and it remained high 10 years after the diagnosis (61–95%). Competing mortality from other causes has continuously increased. The most common non-cancer causes of death were underlying liver diseases (SMR, 15.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 15.1–16.1) and viral hepatitis (SMR, 46.5; 95% CI, 43.9–49.2), which demonstrated higher mortality risks compared to the Korean general population. Higher mortality risks of suicide (SMR, 2.6; 95% CI, 2.4–2.8) was also noted. @*Conclusions@#Patients with liver cancer are most likely to die from liver cancer and related liver disease, even 10 years after the diagnosis, highlighting a need for specialized long-term follow-up care.

2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-925664

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The current study provides national cancer statistics and their secular trends in Korea, including incidence, mortality, survival, and prevalence in 2019. @*Materials and Methods@#Incidence, survival, and prevalence rates of cancer were calculated using the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, from 1999 to 2019, with survival follow-up until December 31, 2020. Deaths from cancer were assessed using causes-of-death data obtained from Statistics Korea. @*Results@#In 2019, newly diagnosed cancer cases and deaths from cancer were reported as 254,718 (ASR, 275.4 per 100,000) and 81,203 (ASR, 72.2 per 100,000), respectively. For the first time, lung cancer (n=29,960) became the most frequent cancer in Korea, excluding thyroid cancer. The overall cancer incidence rates increased by 3.3% annually from 1999 to 2012, and decreased by 5.3% annually from 2012 to 2015, thereafter, followed by nonsignificant changes. The incidence of thyroid cancer increased again from 2016 (annual percentage change, 6.2%). Cancer mortality rates have been decreasing since 2002, with more rapid decline in recent years (annual decrease of 2.7% from 2002 to 2013; 3.3% from 2013 to 2019). The 5-year relative survival between 2015 and 2019 was 70.7%, which contributed to prevalent cases reaching over 2 million in 2019. @*Conclusion@#Cancer survival rates have improved over the past decades, but the number of newly diagnosed cancers is still increasing, with some cancers showing only marginal improvement in survival outcomes. As the number of cancer survivors increases, a comprehensive cancer control strategy should be implemented in line with the changing aspects of cancer statistics.

3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-925663

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#This study aimed to report the projected cancer incidence and mortality for the year 2022 to estimate Korea’s current cancer burden. @*Materials and Methods@#Cancer incidence data from 1999 to 2019 were obtained from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, and cancer mortality data from 1993 to 2020 were acquired from Statistics Korea. Cancer incidence and mortality were projected by fitting a linear regression model to observed age-specific cancer rates against their respective years and then by multiplying the projected age-specific rates by the anticipated age-specific population for 2022. A joinpoint regression model was used to determine the year in which the linear trend changed significantly; we only used the data of the latest trend. @*Results@#In total, 274,488 new cancer cases and 81,277 cancer deaths are expected to occur in Korea in 2022. The most common cancer site is expected to be the thyroid, followed by the lung, colon and rectum, breast, and stomach. These five cancers are expected to represent half of the overall burden of cancer in Korea. The most common type of cancer leading to death is expected to be lung cancer, followed by liver, colorectal, pancreatic, and gallbladder cancers. @*Conclusion@#The incidence rates for all types of cancer in Korea are estimated to gradually decrease. These up-to-date estimates of the cancer burden in Korea could be an important resource for planning and evaluating cancer-control programs.

4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-874346

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#This study investigated the incidence and relative survival rates (RSRs) for cancers among adolescents and young adults (AYAs) aged 15-39 years between 1993 and 2016 in Korea @*Materials and Methods@#Data from the Korea Central Cancer Registry were used to calculate percent distributions, age-specific incidence rates, age-standardized incidence rates (ASRs) per million, annual percent changes (APCs), average APCs, and RSRs for cancers diagnosed in AYAs. @*Results@#ASR of all cancers among AYAs was 654.5 per million. The largest diagnosed group of cancers was carcinomas (almost 80%). Crude incidence increased with age, from 170.4 per million for those aged 15-19 years to 1,639.8 per million for those aged 35-39 years. ASR increased from 414.8 per million to 820.4 per million, with an APC of 9.0%. The incidence of thyroid carcinoma showed the most rapid increment (APC, 14.0%), followed by non-Hodgkin lymphoma (APC, 13.4%). The 5-year RSR among AYAs significantly improved from 62.1% to 90.8%. Survival improvement in AYAs was higher than that in children but lower than that in older adults (APC, 2.1% vs. 1.9% vs. 3.1%). The most marked survival improvement was found for leukemia and lymphoma. Astrocytoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and carcinoma of the trachea, bronchus, and lung had a 5-year RSR of < 50%. @*Conclusion@#There was an improvement in cancer survivals in AYAs, comparable to that achieved in children. However, survivals in several cancer types do not appear to be improving. Further research focusing on the epidemiology and therapeutic strategies for cancers in AYAs is needed.

5.
Journal of Breast Cancer ; : 123-137, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-898977

ABSTRACT

Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in Korean women, and its incidence continues to increase. The Korean Breast Cancer Society (KBCS) established a nationwide breast cancer database through its online enrollment program in 1996. This study aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics of breast cancer in Korea, and to assess the pattern of changes in breast cancer management in 2018. We analyzed the KBCS and Korea Central Cancer Registry (KCCR) databases in 2018. In 2018, 28,157 patients were newly diagnosed with breast cancer, of whom 4,510 had noninvasive breast cancer and 23,647 had invasive breast cancer. The age-standardized rate of breast cancer in 2018 was 79.0 per 100,000 women (65.6 invasive, 13.4 noninvasive). The median age of female patients diagnosed with breast cancer in 2018 was 52 years, and the incidence of breast cancer was the highest in the 40–49-years age group (9,432 patients, 33.6%). The proportion of patients with stage 0 and stage I breast cancer continued to increase, accounting for 63.8% of cases, and breast-conserving surgery was performed more often than mastectomy (66.2% vs. 33.0%). The most common subtypes of breast cancer were hormone receptor [HR]-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)-negative types (65.9% of cases), while the HR-negative and HER2-positive types accounted for 9.2% of cases. According to the KCCR data, from 2014 to 2018, the 5-year relative survival rate of patients with breast cancer was 93.3%, which was 14.0% higher than that from 1993 to 1995 (79.3%). The clinical characteristics of breast cancer in Korea have been changing, and national databases can improve our understanding of the disease characteristics of Korean women. Therefore, updating the KBCS registry is important for the effective management of breast cancer in Korea.

6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-897440

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The purpose of this study was to determine the epidemiologic characteristics and survival of patients with primary brain and other central nervous system (CNS) tumors in Korea and to compare our findings with those from the United States. @*Materials and Methods@#We collected data on primary brain and CNS tumors diagnosed between 2007 and 2016 from the Korea Central Cancer Registry. The age-standardized incidence rates (ASRs) and 5-year relative survival rates (RSRs) were evaluated. We applied the classification and definitions of the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States to our analysis for direct comparison with United States data. @*Results@#A total of 115,050 primary brain and CNS tumors were identified, and the ASR of all tumors was 22.01 per 100,000 individuals, which was lower than the 23.41 in the United States. However, the ASR of malignant tumors was significantly lower herein (4.27) than in the United States (7.08). Meningeal tumors were the most common histologic group among all tumors (ASR, 8.32). The 5-year RSR of all primary brain and other CNS tumors was 86.4%, and that of all malignant tumors was 44.1%, which was higher than the 35.8% observed in the United States. Among malignant tumors, glioblastomas had the lowest 5-year RSR (12.1%). @*Conclusion@#In Korea, malignant brain and other CNS tumors have a lower incidence and better survival outcome.

7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-897415

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The current study provides national cancer statistics and their secular trends in Korea, including incidence, mortality, survival, and prevalence in 2018. @*Materials and Methods@#Incidence, survival, and prevalence rates of cancer were calculated using the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, from 1999 to 2018, with survival follow-up until December 31, 2019. Deaths from cancer were assessed using causes-of-death data obtained from Statistics Korea. Crude and age-standardized rates (ASRs) for incidence, mortality, prevalence, and 5-year relative survival rates were calculated, and temporal trends for incidence and mortality rates were evaluated, with annual percentage changes. @*Results@#In 2018, newly diagnosed cancer cases and deaths from cancer were reported as 243,837 (ASR, 270.4 per 100,000) and 79,153 (ASR, 73.3 per 100,000), respectively. The overall cancer incidence rates increased by 3.3% annually from 1999 to 2012, and decreased by 5.4% annually from 2012 to 2015, thereafter, followed by nonsignificant changes. Cancer mortality rates have been decreasing since 2002, with more rapid decline in recent years (annual decrease of 2.7% from 2007 to 2014; 3.7% from 2014 to 2018). The 5-year relative survival between 2014 and 2018 was 70.3%, which contributed to prevalent cases reaching over 2 million by the end of 2018. @*Conclusion@#Cancer statistics have improved significantly during the past two decades. However, there remain important challenges to be solved, such as controlling cancers with low survival rates. Cancer statistics can be used to discover blind spots in cancer control, and as evidence for developing and implementing future cancer control strategies.

8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-897414

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#This study aimed to report the projected cancer incidence and mortality for the year 2021 to estimate Korea’s current cancer burden. @*Materials and Methods@#Cancer incidence data from 1999 to 2018 were obtained from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, and cancer mortality data from 1993 to 2019 were acquired from Statistics Korea. Cancer incidence and mortality were projected by fitting a linear regression model to observed age-specific cancer rates against their respective years and then by multiplying the projected age-specific rates by the anticipated age-specific population for 2021. A joinpoint regression model was used to determine the year in which the linear trend changed significantly; we only used the data of the latest trend. @*Results@#In total, 259,999 new cancer cases and 81,567 cancer deaths are expected to occur in Korea in 2021. The most common cancer site is expected to be the lung, followed by the thyroid, colon and rectum, breast, and stomach. These five cancers are expected to represent half of the overall burden of cancer in Korea. The most common type of cancer leading to death is expected to be lung cancer, followed by liver, colorectal, pancreatic, and stomach cancers. @*Conclusion@#The incidence rates for all types of cancer in Korea are estimated to gradually decrease. These up-to-date estimates of the cancer burden in Korea could be an important resource for planning and evaluating cancer-control programs.

9.
Journal of Breast Cancer ; : 123-137, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-891273

ABSTRACT

Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in Korean women, and its incidence continues to increase. The Korean Breast Cancer Society (KBCS) established a nationwide breast cancer database through its online enrollment program in 1996. This study aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics of breast cancer in Korea, and to assess the pattern of changes in breast cancer management in 2018. We analyzed the KBCS and Korea Central Cancer Registry (KCCR) databases in 2018. In 2018, 28,157 patients were newly diagnosed with breast cancer, of whom 4,510 had noninvasive breast cancer and 23,647 had invasive breast cancer. The age-standardized rate of breast cancer in 2018 was 79.0 per 100,000 women (65.6 invasive, 13.4 noninvasive). The median age of female patients diagnosed with breast cancer in 2018 was 52 years, and the incidence of breast cancer was the highest in the 40–49-years age group (9,432 patients, 33.6%). The proportion of patients with stage 0 and stage I breast cancer continued to increase, accounting for 63.8% of cases, and breast-conserving surgery was performed more often than mastectomy (66.2% vs. 33.0%). The most common subtypes of breast cancer were hormone receptor [HR]-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)-negative types (65.9% of cases), while the HR-negative and HER2-positive types accounted for 9.2% of cases. According to the KCCR data, from 2014 to 2018, the 5-year relative survival rate of patients with breast cancer was 93.3%, which was 14.0% higher than that from 1993 to 1995 (79.3%). The clinical characteristics of breast cancer in Korea have been changing, and national databases can improve our understanding of the disease characteristics of Korean women. Therefore, updating the KBCS registry is important for the effective management of breast cancer in Korea.

10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-889736

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The purpose of this study was to determine the epidemiologic characteristics and survival of patients with primary brain and other central nervous system (CNS) tumors in Korea and to compare our findings with those from the United States. @*Materials and Methods@#We collected data on primary brain and CNS tumors diagnosed between 2007 and 2016 from the Korea Central Cancer Registry. The age-standardized incidence rates (ASRs) and 5-year relative survival rates (RSRs) were evaluated. We applied the classification and definitions of the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States to our analysis for direct comparison with United States data. @*Results@#A total of 115,050 primary brain and CNS tumors were identified, and the ASR of all tumors was 22.01 per 100,000 individuals, which was lower than the 23.41 in the United States. However, the ASR of malignant tumors was significantly lower herein (4.27) than in the United States (7.08). Meningeal tumors were the most common histologic group among all tumors (ASR, 8.32). The 5-year RSR of all primary brain and other CNS tumors was 86.4%, and that of all malignant tumors was 44.1%, which was higher than the 35.8% observed in the United States. Among malignant tumors, glioblastomas had the lowest 5-year RSR (12.1%). @*Conclusion@#In Korea, malignant brain and other CNS tumors have a lower incidence and better survival outcome.

11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-889711

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The current study provides national cancer statistics and their secular trends in Korea, including incidence, mortality, survival, and prevalence in 2018. @*Materials and Methods@#Incidence, survival, and prevalence rates of cancer were calculated using the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, from 1999 to 2018, with survival follow-up until December 31, 2019. Deaths from cancer were assessed using causes-of-death data obtained from Statistics Korea. Crude and age-standardized rates (ASRs) for incidence, mortality, prevalence, and 5-year relative survival rates were calculated, and temporal trends for incidence and mortality rates were evaluated, with annual percentage changes. @*Results@#In 2018, newly diagnosed cancer cases and deaths from cancer were reported as 243,837 (ASR, 270.4 per 100,000) and 79,153 (ASR, 73.3 per 100,000), respectively. The overall cancer incidence rates increased by 3.3% annually from 1999 to 2012, and decreased by 5.4% annually from 2012 to 2015, thereafter, followed by nonsignificant changes. Cancer mortality rates have been decreasing since 2002, with more rapid decline in recent years (annual decrease of 2.7% from 2007 to 2014; 3.7% from 2014 to 2018). The 5-year relative survival between 2014 and 2018 was 70.3%, which contributed to prevalent cases reaching over 2 million by the end of 2018. @*Conclusion@#Cancer statistics have improved significantly during the past two decades. However, there remain important challenges to be solved, such as controlling cancers with low survival rates. Cancer statistics can be used to discover blind spots in cancer control, and as evidence for developing and implementing future cancer control strategies.

12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-889710

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#This study aimed to report the projected cancer incidence and mortality for the year 2021 to estimate Korea’s current cancer burden. @*Materials and Methods@#Cancer incidence data from 1999 to 2018 were obtained from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, and cancer mortality data from 1993 to 2019 were acquired from Statistics Korea. Cancer incidence and mortality were projected by fitting a linear regression model to observed age-specific cancer rates against their respective years and then by multiplying the projected age-specific rates by the anticipated age-specific population for 2021. A joinpoint regression model was used to determine the year in which the linear trend changed significantly; we only used the data of the latest trend. @*Results@#In total, 259,999 new cancer cases and 81,567 cancer deaths are expected to occur in Korea in 2021. The most common cancer site is expected to be the lung, followed by the thyroid, colon and rectum, breast, and stomach. These five cancers are expected to represent half of the overall burden of cancer in Korea. The most common type of cancer leading to death is expected to be lung cancer, followed by liver, colorectal, pancreatic, and stomach cancers. @*Conclusion@#The incidence rates for all types of cancer in Korea are estimated to gradually decrease. These up-to-date estimates of the cancer burden in Korea could be an important resource for planning and evaluating cancer-control programs.

13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-915115

ABSTRACT

Objective@#We aimed to determine the differences in stage at diagnosis of cervical cancer among Korean women according to screening history. @*Methods@#Using linkage data from the Korean Central Cancer Registry and Korean National Cancer Screening Program (KNCSP), we included 18,388 women older than 30 years who were newly diagnosed with cervical cancer between 2013 and 2014 and examined their screening history. Between individuals, age group and socioeconomic status were matched to control for potential confounders. @*Results@#Significantly more cases of carcinoma in situ (CIS) were diagnosed in the ever-screened (71.77%) group than in the never-screened group (54.78%), while localized, regional, distant, and unknown stage were more frequent in the never-screened group. Women in the ever-screened group were most likely to be diagnosed with CIS than with invasive cervical cancer (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=2.40; 95% confidence interval [CI]=2.18–2.65). The aOR for being diagnosed with CIS was highest among women who were screened 3 times or more (aOR=5.10; 95% CI=4.03–6.45). The ORs were highest for women screened within 24 months of diagnosis and tended to decrease with an increasing time since last screening (p-trend <0.01). @*Conclusion@#The KNCSP for cervical cancer was found to be positively associated with diagnosis of cervical cancers at earlier stages among women aged 30 years or older. The benefit of screening according to time was highest for women screened within 24 months of diagnosis.

14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-915041

ABSTRACT

Objective@#Conditional relative survival (CRS) considers changes in prognosis over time and may offer more useful estimates for survivors. We aimed to investigate CRS among patients with cervical cancer stratified by various factors that influence survival probability. @*Methods@#This nationwide retrospective study used data from the Korean Central Cancer Registry. We included 78,606 patients diagnosed with cervical cancer as their first cancer between January 1, 1996 and December 31, 2015, and who were followed until December 31, 2016. CRS and the conditional probabilities of death for the following 1 year were stratified by age at diagnosis, histology, cancer stage, treatment, year of diagnosis, and social deprivation index. @*Results@#The 5-year relative survival rate at the time of diagnosis was 80.6% for all cases. The probability of surviving an additional 5 years conditioned on having already survived 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years after diagnosis was 85.7%, 90.6%, 93.5%, 95.3%, and 94.3%, respectively.Patients with poorer initial survival estimates (older, advanced stage, non-squamous cell histology) generally showed the largest increases in CRS over time. Patients aged ≥70 years had the highest probability of death in the first year after diagnosis (24.5%), but the conditional probability of death in the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th years declined abruptly to 13.1%, 7.5%, 5.4%, and 3.9%, respectively. @*Conclusions@#The CRS rates for patients with cervical cancer improved over time, particularly among patients with poorer initial prognoses. Our estimates enable patients to make better informed decisions regarding follow-up care and their personal life.

15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-915035

ABSTRACT

Objective@#This study sought to examine changes in trends for quality indicators of the population-based Korean National Cancer Screening Program (KNCSP) for cervical cancer from years 2005 to 2013. @*Methods@#Our study data were derived from the KNCSP database. Cervical cancer diagnosis information was ascertained through linkage with the Korean National Cancer Registry and the KNCSP database. Performance measures for cervical cancer screening were estimated, including participation rate, positive rate, crude detection rate (CDR), interval cancer rate (ICR), positive predictive value (PPV), sensitivity, and specificity. Joinpoint analysis was applied to calculate annual percentage changes (APCs) in all indicators according to sociodemographic factors. @*Results@#A significant increasing trend was noted in participation rates (APC=13.4%; 95% confidence interval [CI]=10.5, 16.4). PPV and specificity increased from years 2005 to 2009 and remained stable till 2013. An increasing trend was discovered in CDRs for cervical cancer in situ (APC=3.9%; 95% CI=1.0, 6.9), whereas a decreasing trend was observed in ICRs for invasive cervical cancer (APC=−2.5%; 95% CI=−4.5, −0.5). Medical Aid recipients and women older than 70 years showed the lowest participation rates, but higher CDRs and ICRs, compared to other groups. In general, most of the quality indicators for cervical cancer screening improved from 2005 to 2009 and remained stable to 2013. @*Conclusion@#The KNCSP for cervical cancer in Korea has improved in terms of participation rate and accuracy of the screening test. These results may be attributed to the National Quality Improvement Program for KNCSP.

16.
Journal of Breast Cancer ; : 115-128, 2020.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-835608

ABSTRACT

This article describes the breast cancer statistics in Korea, including the incidence, type of surgical procedure, stage, and molecular subtype, using the Korean Breast Cancer Society (KBCS) and Korea Central Cancer Registry data. There were a total of 26,534 new breast cancer diagnoses in 2017 in Korea, of which 4,139 were carcinoma in situ cases and 22,395 were invasive cancer cases. The age standardized rate of breast cancer was 75.3 per 100,000 women in 2017 (63.0 of invasive carcinoma and 12.3 of carcinoma in situ), and it has been steadily increasing across all age groups. Breast cancer occurred most commonly in the 40–49 age group. Compared to 2016, breast conserving surgery (BCS) has increased, and 67.4% of patients were treated with BCS in 2017. The proportions of stage 0 and stage I have continued to increase, accounting for 60.7%. The most common subtype of breast cancer was hormone receptor (HR) positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) negative type comprising 65.9% of the cases, whereas HR negative and HER2 positive type was the rarest comprising 10.2% of the cases. The 5-year relative survival rate of breast cancer patients had increased by 14.0% from 79.2% in 1993–1995 to 93.2% in 2013–2017. It is essential to actively enter breast cancer data into the KBCS registry to improve our understanding.

17.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-830386

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Anal cancer is a rare disease in Korea, and thus survival analyses are limited by small sample sizes. This study used the Korea Central Cancer Registry (KCCR) for a survival analysis and for assessing characteristics of anal cancer in a large sample of Koreans. @*Methods@#From the KCCR, data on 3,615 patients who were diagnosed and treated for anal cancer from 1993 to 2015 were retrieved. Clinicopathologic variables including age, sex, histological type, and Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) stage were reviewed, and a survival analysis was performed according to these variables. @*Results@#The 5-year relative survival rate improved from 39.7% in 1993–1995 to 66.5% in 2011–2015. Squamous cell carcinoma was the most common and showed the highest survival rate. Males and older patients (≥40 years and ≥70 years) showed poor prognoses. @*Conclusion@#The survival rate for anal cancer in Korea has improved steadily over time. The characteristics related to survival were the histological type, sex, and age. These statistics will be fundamental for future Korean anal cancer research.

18.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-831064

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#This study reports the cancer statistics and temporal trends in Korea on a nationwide scale,including incidence, survival, prevalence, and mortality in 2017. @*Materials and Methods@#The incidence, survival, and prevalence rates of cancer were evaluated using data from theKorea National Cancer Incidence Database from 1999 to 2017 with follow-up until December31, 2018. Deaths from cancer were assessed using cause-of-death data from 1983 to2017, obtained from Statistics Korea. Crude and age-standardized rates (ASRs) for incidence,mortality, and prevalence, and 5-year relative survival rates were calculated andtrend analysis was performed. @*Results@#In 2017, newly diagnosed cancer cases and deaths from cancer numbered 232,255 (ASR,264.4 per 100,000) and 78,863 (ASR, 76.6 per 100,000), respectively. The overall cancerincidence rates increased annually by 3.5% from 1999 to 2011 and decreased by 2.7%annually thereafter. Cancer mortality rates have been decreasing since 2002, by 2.8%annually. The 5-year relative survival rate for all patients diagnosed with cancer between2013 and 2017 was 70.4%, which contributed to a prevalence of approximately 1.87 millioncases by the end of 2017. @*Conclusion@#The burden of cancer measured by incidence and mortality rates have improved in Korea,with the exception of a few particular cancers that are associated with increasing incidenceor mortality rates. However, cancer prevalence is increasing rapidly, with the dramaticimprovement in survival during the past several years. Comprehensive cancer control strategiesand efforts should continue, based on the changes of cancer statistics.

19.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-831063

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#This study aimed to report the projected cancer incidence and mortality for the year 2020to estimate Korea’s current cancer burden. @*Materials and Methods@#Cancer incidence data from 1999 to 2017 were obtained from the Korea National CancerIncidence Database, and cancer mortality data from 1993 to 2018 were acquired from StatisticsKorea. Cancer incidence and mortality were projected by fitting a linear regressionmodel to observed age-specific cancer rates against observed years and then by multiplyingthe projected age-specific rates by the age-specific population. A Joinpoint regression modelwas used to determine the year in which the linear trend changed significantly; we only usedthe data of the latest trend. @*Results@#In total, 243,263 new cancer cases and 80,546 cancer deaths are expected to occur inKorea in 2020. The most common cancer site is expected to be the lung, followed by thestomach, thyroid, colon/rectum, and breast. These five cancers types are expected to representhalf of the overall burden of cancer in Korea. The most common type of canceramong people who die is expected to be lung cancer, followed by liver, colon/rectal, pancreatic,and stomach cancers. @*Conclusion@#The incidence rates for all types of cancer in Korea are estimated to decrease gradually.These up-to-date estimates of the cancer burden in Korea could be an important resourcefor planning and evaluating cancer-control programs.

20.
Journal of Breast Cancer ; : 153-153, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-738406

ABSTRACT

This article was initially published on the Journal of Breast Cancer with a misspelled legend display in Figure 3. The postmenopause and premenopause should be changed with each other.

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