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1.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : e333-2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-1001203

ABSTRACT

Background@#Many studies have evaluated the prevalence of different reasons for retraction in samples of retraction notices. We aimed to perform a systematic review of such empirical studies of retraction causes. @*Methods@#The PubMed/MEDLINE database and the Embase database were searched in June 2023. Eligible studies were those containing sufficient data on the reasons for retraction across samples of examined retracted notices. @*Results@#A 11,181 potentially eligible items were identified, and 43 studies of retractions were included in this systematic review. Studies limited to retraction notices of a specific subspecialty or country, journal/publication type are emerging since 2015. We noticed that the reasons for retraction are becoming more specific and more diverse. In a meta-analysis of 17 studies focused on different subspecialties, misconduct was responsible for 60% (95% confidence interval [CI], 53–67%) of all retractions while error and publication issues contributed to 17% (95% CI, 12–22%) and 9% (95% CI, 6–13%), respectively. The end year of the retraction period in all included studies and the proportion of misconduct presented a weak positive association (coefficient = 1.3% per year, P = 0.002). @*Conclusion@#Misconduct seems to be the most frequently recorded reason for retraction across empirical analyses of retraction notices, but other reasons are not negligible. Greater specificity of causes and standardization is needed in retraction notices.

2.
Journal of Integrative Medicine ; (12): 149-158, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-971650

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND@#Hospitalized patients recovering from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may experience disability and suffer from significant physical and mental impairment requiring physical rehabilitation following their discharge. However, to date, no attempt has been made to collate and synthesize literature in this area.@*OBJECTIVE@#This systematic review examines the outcomes of different physical rehabilitation interventions tested in COVID-19 patients who were discharged from hospital.@*SEARCH STRATEGY@#A systematic search of MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus and medRxiv was conducted to identify articles published up to March 2022.@*INCLUSION CRITERIA@#This systematic review included studies of outpatient rehabilitation programs for people recovering from COVID-19 who received physical activity, exercise, or breathing training to enhance or restore functional capacity, pulmonary function, quality of life, and mental health or function.@*DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS@#Selection of included articles, data extraction, and methodological quality assessments were conducted by two review authors respectively, and consensus was reached through discussion and consultation with a third reviewer. Finally, we review the outcomes of studies based on four categories including: (1) functional capacity, (2) pulmonary function, (3) quality of life, and (4) mental health status.@*RESULTS@#A total of 7534 titles and abstracts were screened; 10 cohort studies, 4 randomized controlled trials and 13 other prospective studies involving 1583 patients were included in our review. Early physical rehabilitation interventions applied in COVID-19 patients who were discharged from the hospital improved multiple parameters related to functional capacity, pulmonary function, quality of life and mental health status.@*CONCLUSION@#Physical rehabilitation interventions may be safe, feasible and effective in COVID-19 patients discharged from the hospital, and can improve a variety of clinically relevant outcomes. Further studies are warranted to determine the underlying mechanisms. Please cite this article as: Rahmati M, Molanouri Shamsi M, Woo W, Koyanagi A, Won Lee SW, Keon Yon DK, Shin JI, Smith L. Effects of physical rehabilitation interventions in COVID-19 patients following discharge from hospital: A systematic review. J Integr Med. 2022; 21(2): 149-158.


Subject(s)
Humans , Patient Discharge , Quality of Life , COVID-19 , Prospective Studies , Hospitals , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
3.
Clinical and Molecular Hepatology ; : 433-452, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-999965

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Global distribution of dominant liver cancer aetiologies has significantly changed over the past decades. This study analyzed the updated temporal trends of liver cancer aetiologies and sociodemographic status in 204 countries and territories from 1990 to 2019. @*Methods@#The Global Burden of Disease 2019 report was used for statistical analysis. In addition, we performed stratification analysis to five quintiles using sociodemographic index and 21 geographic regions. @*Results@#The crude numbers of liver cancer disease-adjusted life years (DALYs) and deaths significantly increased during the study period (DALYs; 11,278,630 in 1990 and 12,528,422 in 2019, deaths; 365,215 in 1990 and 484,577 in 2019). However, the Age-standardized DALY and mortality rates decreased. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains the leading cause of liver cancer DALYs and mortality, followed by hepatitis C virus (HCV), alcohol consumption, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitison-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NASH/NAFLD). Although Age-standardized DALY and mortality rates of liver cancer due to HBV and HCV have decreased, the rates due to alcohol consumption and NASH/NAFLD have increased. In 2019, the population of the East Asia region had the highest Age-standardized DALY and mortality rates, followed by high-income Asia-Pacific and Central Asia populations. Although East Asia and high-income Asia-Pacific regions showed a decrease during the study period, Age-standardized DALY rates increased in Central Asia. High-income North American and Australasian populations also showed a significant increase in Age-standardized DALY. @*Conclusions@#Liver cancer remains an ongoing global threat. The burden of liver cancer associated with alcohol consumption and NASH/NAFLD is markedly increasing and projected to continuously increase.

4.
Journal of Korean Medical Science ; : e291-2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-915485

ABSTRACT

Background@#Evidence for the association between underlying non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the risk of testing severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARSCoV-2) positive, and the clinical consequences of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is controversial and scarce. We aimed to investigate the association between the presence of NAFLD and the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infectivity and COVID-19-related outcomes. @*Methods@#We used the population-based, nationwide cohort in South Korea linked with the general health examination records between January 1, 2018 and July 30, 2020. Data for 212,768 adults older than 20 years who underwent SARS-CoV-2 testing from January 1 to May 30, 2020, were obtained. The presence of NAFLDs was defined using three definitions, namely hepatic steatosis index (HSI), fatty liver index (FLI), and claims-based definition. The outcomes were SARS-CoV-2 test positive, COVID-19 severe illness, and related death. @*Results@#Among 74,244 adults who completed the general health examination, there were 2,251 (3.0%) who were SARS-CoV-2 positive, 438 (0.6%) with severe COVID-19 illness, and 45 (0.06%) COVID-19-related deaths. After exposure-driven propensity score matching, patients with pre-existing HSI-NAFLD, FLI-NAFLD, or claims-based NAFLD had an 11–23% increased risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection (HSI-NAFLD 95% confidence interval [CI], 1–28%; FLI-NAFLD 95% CI, 2–27%; and claims-based NAFLD 95% CI, 2–31%) and a 35–41% increased risk of severe COVID-19 illness (HSI-NAFLD 95% CI, 8–83%; FLI-NAFLD 95% CI, 5–71%; and claims-based NAFLD 95% CI, 1–92%). These associations are more evident as liver fibrosis advanced (based on the BARD scoring system). Similar patterns were observed in several sensitivity analyses including the full-unmatched cohort. @*Conclusion@#Patients with pre-existing NAFLDs have a higher likelihood of testing SARSCoV-2 positive and severe COVID-19 illness; this association was more evident in patients with NAFLD with advanced fibrosis. Our results suggest that extra attention should be given to the management of patients with NAFLD during the COVID-19 pandemic.

5.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 1-11, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-875608

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has caused a worldwide pandemic. The first reports of patients with COVID-19 were provided to World Health Organization on December 21, 2019 and were presumably associated with seafood markets in Wuhan, China. As of October 25, 2020, more than 42 million cases have been confirmed worldwide, with more than 1.1 million deaths. Asymptomatic transmission contributes significantly to transmission, and clinical features are non-specific to the disease. Thus, the diagnosis of COVID-19 requires specific viral RNA testing. The disease demonstrates extensive human-to-human transmissibility and has infected healthcare workers at high rates. Clinical awareness of the epidemiology and the risk factors for nosocomial transmission of COVID-19 is essential to preventing infection. Moreover, effective control measures should be further identified by comprehensive evaluation of hospital and community responses. In this review, we provide a comprehensive update on the epidemiology, presentation, transmission, risk factors, and public health measures associated with COVID-19. We also review past insights from previous coronavirus epidemics [i.e., severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)] to suggest measures to reduce transmission.

6.
Yonsei Medical Journal ; : 349-358, 2020.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-833377

ABSTRACT

Globally and in Africa specifically, female sex workers (FSWs) are at an extraordinarily high risk of contracting human immunodeficiencyvirus (HIV). Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has emerged as an effective and ethical method with which to preventHIV infection among FSWs. PrEP efficacy is, however, closely linked to adherence, and adherence to PrEP among FSWs is a complexand interrelated process that has been shown to be of importance to public health policies and HIV control and interventionprograms. This comprehensive review categorizes barriers to and facilitators of adherence to HIV PrEP for FSWs, and describes fivestrategies for promoting PrEP adherence among FSWs. These strategies encompass 1) a long-term educational effort to decreasethe stigma associated with sex work and PrEP use, 2) education on how PrEP works, 3) lifestyle modification, 4) research on nextgenerationPrEP products to address the inconvenience of taking daily pills, and 5) integration of PrEP into existing services, suchas social services and routine primary care visits, to reduce the economic burden of seeking the medication. Our review is expectedto be useful for the design of future PrEP intervention programs. Multidisciplinary intervention should be considered to promotePrEP adherence among FSWs in order to help control the HIV epidemic.

7.
Safety and Health at Work ; : 117-129, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-45279

ABSTRACT

Chronic disease rates have become more prevalent in the modern American workforce, which has negative implications for workplace productivity and healthcare costs. Offering workplace health interventions is recognized as an effective strategy to reduce chronic disease progression, absenteeism, and healthcare costs as well as improve population health. This review documents intervention and evaluation strategies used for health promotion programs delivered in workplaces. Using predetermined search terms in five online databases, we identified 1,131 published items from 1995 to 2014. Of these items, 27 peer-reviewed articles met the inclusion criteria; reporting data from completed United States-based workplace interventions that recruited at-risk employees based on their disease or disease-related risk factors. A content rubric was developed and used to catalogue these 27 published field studies. Selected workplace interventions targeted obesity (n=13), cardiovascular diseases (n=8), and diabetes (n=6). Intervention strategies included instructional education/counseling (n=20), workplace environmental change (n=6), physical activity (n=10), use of technology (n=10), and incentives (n=13). Self-reported data (n=21), anthropometric measurements (n=17), and laboratory tests (n=14) were used most often in studies with outcome evaluation. This is the first literature review to focus on interventions for employees with elevated risk for chronic diseases. The review has the potential to inform future workplace health interventions by presenting strategies related to implementation and evaluation strategies in workplace settings. These strategies can help determine optimal worksite health programs based on the unique characteristics of work settings and the health risk factors of their employee populations.


Subject(s)
Absenteeism , Cardiovascular Diseases , Chronic Disease , Efficiency , Health Care Costs , Health Promotion , Motivation , Motor Activity , Obesity , Occupational Health , Risk Factors , Workplace
8.
Arq. bras. cardiol ; 107(4): 354-364, Oct. 2016. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-827854

ABSTRACT

Abstract Background: Orthostatic intolerance patients' pathophysiological mechanism is still obscure, contributing to the difficulty in their clinical management. Objective: To investigate hemodynamic changes during tilt test in individuals with orthostatic intolerance symptoms, including syncope or near syncope. Methods: Sixty-one patients who underwent tilt test at - 70° in the phase without vasodilators were divided into two groups. For data analysis, only the first 20 minutes of tilting were considered. Group I was made up of 33 patients who had an increase of total peripheral vascular resistance (TPVR) during orthostatic position; and Group II was made up of 28 patients with a decrease in TPVR (characterizing insufficient peripheral vascular resistance). The control group consisted of 24 healthy asymptomatic individuals. Hemodynamic parameters were obtained by a non-invasive hemodynamic monitor in three different moments (supine position, tilt 10' and tilt 20') adjusted for age. Results: In the supine position, systolic volume (SV) was significantly reduced in both Group II and I in comparison to the control group, respectively (66.4 ±14.9 ml vs. 81.8±14.8 ml vs. 101.5±24.2 ml; p<0.05). TPVR, however, was higher in Group II in comparison to Group I and controls, respectively (1750.5± 442 dyne.s/cm5 vs.1424±404 dyne.s/cm5 vs. 974.4±230 dyne.s/cm5; p<0.05). In the orthostatic position, at 10', there was repetition of findings, with lower absolute values of SV compared to controls (64.1±14.0 ml vs 65.5±11.3 ml vs 82.8±15.6 ml; p<0.05). TPVR, on the other hand, showed a relative drop in Group II, in comparison to Group I. Conclusion: Reduced SV was consistently observed in the groups of patients with orthostatic intolerance in comparison to the control group. Two different responses to tilt test were observed: one group with elevated TPVR and another with a relative drop in TPVR, possibly suggesting a more severe failure of compensation mechanisms.


Resumo Fundamento: O mecanismo fisiopatológico de pacientes com intolerância ortostática ainda é obscuro, contribuindo para a dificuldade no manejo clínicos desses pacientes. Objetivo: Investigar as alterações hemodinâmicas durante teste de inclinação (tilt teste) em indivíduos com sintomas de intolerância ortostática, incluindo síncope ou pré-síncope. Métodos: Sessenta e um pacientes, com tilt teste a 70º negativo na fase livre de vasodilatador, foram divididos em dois grupos. Para análise dos dados foram considerados apenas os primeiros 20 minutos de inclinação. Grupo I (33 pacientes) que tiveram elevação da resistência vascular periférica total (RVPT) durante posição ortostática e Grupo II (28 pacientes) com queda da RVPT (caracterizando insuficiência de resistência vascular periférica). O grupo controle consistia de indivíduos saudáveis e assintomáticos (24 indivíduos). Os parâmetros hemodinâmicos foram obtidos por um monitor hemodinâmico não invasivo em 3 momentos distintos (posição supina, tilt 10' e tilt 20'), ajustados para idade. Resultados: Na posição supina, o volume sistólico (VS) foi significantemente reduzido tanto no Grupo II quanto no I, quando comparado ao do Grupo controle, respectivamente (66,4 ±14,9 ml vs. 81,8±14,8 ml vs. 101,5±24,2 ml; p<0,05.) A RVPT, no entanto, foi mais elevada no Grupo II, quando comparada a do Grupo I e controles, respectivamente (1750,5± 442 dyne.s/cm5 vs.1424±404 dyne.s/cm5 vs. 974,4±230 dyne.s/cm5; p<0,05). Na posição ortostática, aos 10', houve repetição dos achados, com valores absolutos inferiores de VS Comparado aos controles (64,1±14,0 ml vs 65,5±11,3 ml vs 82,8±15,6 ml; p<0,05). A RVPT, todavia, apresentou queda relativa no Grupo II comparado ao I. Conclusão: Volume sistólico reduzido foi consistentemente observado nos grupos de pacientes com intolerância ortostática, quando comparado ao grupo controle. Foram observadas duas respostas distintas ao teste de inclinação: um grupo com elevação de RVPT e outro com queda relativa desta, indicando, possivelmente, falência mais acentuada dos mecanismos de compensação.


Subject(s)
Humans , Adolescent , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Young Adult , Blood Pressure/physiology , Tilt-Table Test/methods , Orthostatic Intolerance/physiopathology , Hemodynamics/physiology , Reference Values , Syncope/physiopathology , Systole/physiology , Time Factors , Case-Control Studies , Anthropometry , Retrospective Studies , Supine Position/physiology
9.
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-132452

ABSTRACT

Abstract: Numerous nursing studies have examined suffering, but none have addressed the suffering and healing Buddhist mothers experience after the accidental death of a child. The purpose of this study was to gain understanding of the meaning of sufferingand the practices of healing and suffering, among Buddhist mothers after such a loss. Buddhist concepts provided the philosophical framework, and Gadamerian hermeneutic phenomenology provided the methodological framework, for this investigation.Ten Buddhist mothers were recruited from a government hospital in Songkhla province, Thailand. In-depth interviews were conducted and data were analyzed using hermeneutics. Five themes that reflected the meaning of suffering amongBuddhist mothers, after the accidental death of a child, were identified. They included: the mother’s heart was torn into pieces; the mother’s body was frozen andshe was uncertain she would survive; happiness in the mother’s life was missing; the mother’s anger and rage at self and others; and, the mother worried and wondered about the next life of her deceased child. The mothers were found to heal their suffering by: transforming their relationship with the deceased child; elevating the deceased child to be a very good child capable of going to heaven; making merit in order to pass the benefit to the deceased child; self-healing through understanding and mind cultivation; and, seeking support. The findings promote the  understanding of the suffering and coping of Buddhist mothers whose child accidentally died.

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