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1.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 46(6): 1072-1074, Nov.-Dec. 2020. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1134267

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction We present an alternative procedure for distal hypospadias consisting of urethral mobilization and partial glandar disassembly, namely GUD (glandar urethral disassembly) technique. Materials and Methods A subcoronal circumcision exposes distal dysplastic urethra. We incise the Buck´s fascia on both sides of urethra releasing it partially from the corpora. We keep a thin bridge of urethral plate to the glans and disassembly almost completely the glans from the corpora, except for the bridge. The glans is incised creating two wide wings that are extremely mobile. The urethra is mobilized, advanced and sutured to the tip of the glans. The glans wings embrace the distal urethra producing a conical glans. Discussion The concept of urethral mobilization has been reported and popularized by Koff in the literature to correct distal hypospadias. One of the limitations of this procedure is the risk of urethral retraction due to extensive proximal dissection. We got inspiration from Mitchell and Bagli' s work of penile disassembly in epispadias to develop the GUD concept. We adopt minimal urethral mobilization mainly in glandar/proximal penile shaft and complete deconstruction of the glans, detaching the corpora from the glans and rotating the wide glans wings to embrace the urethra. Therefore we avoid suture urethroplasty and refurbish the glans to a better conical shape. Conclusion We are convinced that this operation can be regarded as a genuine alternative to distal hypospadias (coronal and subcoronal) but should not be addressed to midshaft forms.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Infant , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures , Hypospadias/surgery , Penis/surgery , Urologic Surgical Procedures, Male , Urethra/surgery
2.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 44(2): 409-410, Mar.-Apr. 2018.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1040039

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction and objective Urethral duplication is a rare congenital anomaly, with roughly 200 cases reported in the literature (1). It is more frequent in males, with few cases reported in females. The clinical presentation differs according to the anatomical variant present. The duplication most commonly occurs in the sagittal plane with one urethra located ventrally and the other dorsally (2). Usually the ventral urethra is the more functional of both. Duplications occurring in the coronal plane are quite rare and they are usually associated with bladder duplication (3). The purpose of this paper was to present a video of a boy with an unusual urethral duplication form. Materials and Methods Patient was born premature due to oligohydramnios at 7 months-gestational age and he has initial diagnosis of hypospadia. Since then, he presented at least 7 febrile UTI and mother complained of difficult micturition and a presence of a mass at lower abdomen. Patient was referred to our institution and we identified urethral duplication with a glandar and scrotal meatus, palpable bladder and left penile-hemiscrotum transposition. US and CT-scan showed left kidney agenesis and overdistended bladder. VCUG and retrograde urethrography showed duplication, presence of contrast in the seminal vesicles and complete catheterizing of both urethras was not possible. Results The topic urethra was dysplastic and not patent to a 4Fr plastic tube so we were unable to access it endoscopically. We performed initially a Mitrofanoff procedure to allow CIC and treat chronic retention. Six months later, we assessed both urethras surgically and concluded that dorsal urethra was dysplastic after 3cm still in the penile area and scrotal urethra was not possible to be catheterized. We excised the ventral urethra because of dribbling complaints up to bulbar area and reconstructed the scrotal transposition, keeping the topic urethra for cosmetic issues. Patient had excellent outcome, performs CIC every 4 hours and has not presented further UTI episodes. Discussion and conclusion The urethral duplication is an anomaly that has multiple anatomical presentations. There are several theories about the etiology, but none can explain all types of presentations. There is also more than one rating available, and the Effmann classification is the most detailed. The case exemplifies this varied spectrum of anatomic urethral duplication. It resembles the urethral duplication type IIa-Y, however, ventral urethra meatus was located in penoscrotal area and both urethras were at least partially hypoplastic/dysplastic associated with obstruction and bladder retention. In determining how to best manage a patient with Y-type urethral duplication, the caliber and quality of the orthotopic urethra must first be assessed. Published reports suggest that best outcomes are those using the ventral duplicated urethra for the reconstruction (4). In this case, none of urethras were functional and a supravesical outlet channel had to be provided. The treatment of this condition requires an individualized planning and a vast technical knowledge of reconstructive surgery.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Infant, Newborn , Urethra/abnormalities , Congenital Abnormalities/surgery , Urinary Retention/surgery , Hypospadias/surgery , Kidney/abnormalities , Kidney Diseases/congenital , Chronic Disease , Urinary Retention/complications , Hypospadias/complications , Kidney/surgery , Kidney Diseases/surgery , Kidney Diseases/complications
3.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 39(6): 897-898, Nov-Dec/2013.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-699114

ABSTRACT

Introduction Cloacal exstrophy is a rare occurrence with an incidence of 1:200,000 to 1:400,000 live births. It represents one of the most challenging reconstructive endeavors faced by pediatric surgeons and urologists. Aside from the genitourinary defects, there are other associated anomalies of the gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal and neurological systems that require a multidisciplinary approach when counseling anxious parents. Material and Methods We present a video of a patient with cloacal exstrophy treated with 21 days of life. Surgery consisted of separation and tubularization of the cecal plate from the exstrophied bladder halves and colostomy construction. The bladder was closed primarily and umbilical scar reconstructed and used for ureteral and cistostomy drainage. A urethral catheter was used to guide bladder neck tubularization. A final epispadic penis was obtained and planned for further repair in a second step. Results The patient had an initial uneventful postoperative course and immediate outcome was excellent. The bladder healed nicely but patient presented with abdominal distension in the 5th day of postoperative setting requiring parenteral nutrition. The distal colon persisted with lower diameter although non obstructive, but causing difficulty for fecal progression. Continuous colostomy dilatation and irrigation were required. Conclusions Approximating the bladder halves in the midline at birth and primary bladder closure is a viable option, intestinal transit may be a issue of concern in the early postoperative follow-up. .


Subject(s)
Humans , Infant, Newborn , Male , Bladder Exstrophy/surgery , Cloaca/abnormalities , Cloaca/surgery , Intestines/abnormalities , Intestines/surgery , Colostomy , Treatment Outcome
4.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 38(5): 707-708, Sept.-Oct. 2012.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-656001

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Urethral duplication is a rare congenital anomaly affecting mainly boys. Generally, the duplication develops on the sagittal plane; the accessory urethra may run dorsally or ventrally to the orthotopic one. We present a patient with urethral duplication in which the orthotopic urethra was patent in the penile segment but atresic in the bulbar and prostatic segment. The patient had urinary flow from the rectum and the ectopic urethra could be well identified by anal examination. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Age at surgery was 13 months. The procedure consisted of an ASTRA (anterior sagittal trans-ano-rectal) approach for dividing the urethra and rectum and was successful to move the urethra up to the perineal area. The rectum was reconstructed and the patient placed into a lithotomy position. A urethral catheter inserted in the penile urethra oriented us were the atresic urethra in bulbar area started. The scrotum was opened in the middle and the distance between the two urethral stumps proximal and distal defined the extension of no urethral tissue that consisted of 5 cm. We opened the right scrotal space and a tunica vaginalis flap was obtained and attached to the bulbar tissue for a two-stage urethroplasty strategy. RESULTS: Patient had a nice healing and the tunica vaginalis was nicely incorporated to the adjacent tissue, having the two urethral stumps well delineated. CONCLUSIONS: ASTRA approach in combination with a two-stage urethroplasty with tunica vaginalis dorsal flap proved to be an excellent combination for a rare case of urethral Y duplication having the main urethra into the rectum.


Subject(s)
Humans , Infant , Male , Rectum/surgery , Urethra/abnormalities , Surgical Flaps , Treatment Outcome , Urethra/surgery
5.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 35(4): 459-466, July-Aug. 2009. ilus, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-527205

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To review our clinical experience with urinary continent catheterizable reservoir in children under five years of age. Materials and Methods: A total of 23 patients (16 males, 7 females) with a median age of 3.64 years were evaluated. Among these, 6 (26.08 percent) had a posterior urethral valve, 9 (39.13 percent) myelomeningocele, 4 (17.39 percent) bladder exstrophy, 2 (8.69 percent) genitourinary rabdomyosarcoma, 1 (4.34 percent) had spinal tumor and 1 (4.34 percent) an ano-rectal anomaly. Results: Perioperative complications were observed in four patients consisting of one febrile urinary tract infection, one partial operative wound dehiscence, one partial stomal dehiscence and one vesico-cutaneous fistula after a secondary exstrophy repair. The overall long-term complications rate was 40.90 percent and consisted of two stomal stenoses (9.09 percent), one neobladder mucosal extrusion (4.54 percent), three neobladder calculi (13.63 percent) and persistence of urinary incontinence in three patients (13.63 percent). The overall surgical revision was 36.36 percent and final continence rate was 95.45 percent with mean follow-up of 39.95 months Conclusion: Continent urinary diversion is technically feasible even in small children, with acceptable rates of complications.


Subject(s)
Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Urinary Reservoirs, Continent , Urinary Diversion/methods , Feasibility Studies , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Urinary Diversion/adverse effects , Urinary Reservoirs, Continent/adverse effects
6.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 35(2): 205-216, Mar.-Apr. 2009. ilus, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-516962

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The appendix is the gold-standard channel for the Mitrofanoff principle in pediatric urology, but the search for alternatives is justified considering it may not be available or preferably used for colonic stomas (Malone antegrade continence enema). The aim of this study is to report on technical feasibility of a new approach for creating catheterizable channels in a rabbit model and to present our preliminary clinical experience. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We configured a tube from two rectangular skin flaps 1x4 cm opposite each other in the middle line of the lower inferior abdomen. The channel was anastomosed to the bladder dome with embedding sutures to create a valvular mechanism. The experimental study consisted of 12 rabbits, divided in 4 groups according to the sacrifice schedule at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks. At 30th postoperative day, an urodynamic evaluation was performed to record continence of the stoma. A histological analysis of the specimens stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Masson trichrome and Picrosirius red was also done in group 2 (sacrifice at 4 weeks postoperatively). We used this method in 3 patients with congenital non-neurogenic bladder disease presenting with massive residual volumes without compliance deficits. RESULT: The technique proved feasible in all animals, 9 of 12 could be easily catheterized and underwent urodynamic study. No stoma leakage was observed in 7 animals at high bladder pressures (> 50 cm H20) and only 2 animals had some leakage at 40 cm H20. Urodynamics performed through the stoma showed urethral leakage at 20 cm H20, therefore demonstrating the efficacy of the valvular mechanism. Histological analysis confirmed good integration between the tube and the bladder. Mean follow-up of the clinical series (3 patients) was 7.2 months. Two patients remained continent up to 4 hours, whereas 1 patient had some leakage after 2 hours. CONCLUSION: We were able to confirm feasibility of a new extra-abdominal...


Subject(s)
Animals , Child , Humans , Male , Rabbits , Appendix/surgery , Cystostomy/methods , Urinary Reservoirs, Continent , Urinary Bladder Diseases/surgery , Anastomosis, Surgical , Feasibility Studies , Follow-Up Studies , Models, Animal , Pressure , Suture Techniques , Urodynamics , Urinary Incontinence/surgery
7.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 32(6): 689-696, Nov.-Dec. 2006. tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-441369

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the role of elective appendicovesicostomy in association with Monfort abdominoplasty to avoid urinary tract infection (UTI) and renal damage in the post-operative follow-up of patients with prune belly syndrome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We followed 4 patients operated in our institution (UNIFESP) (Monfort, orchidopexy and Mitrofanoff) and compared them to 2 patients treated similarly, but without an appendicovesicostomy, in a second institution (UFBA). We evaluated postoperative clinical complications, UTI and preservation of renal parenchyma. Patients were followed as outpatients with urinalysis, ultrasonography (US) and occasionally with renal scintigraphy. RESULTS: Mean follow-up was 23.5 months. Immediate post-operative course was uneventful. We observed that only one patient with the Mitrofanoff channel persisted with UTI, while the 2 patients used as controls persisted with recurrent pyelonephritis (> 2 UTI year). CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that no morbidity was added by the appendicovesicostomy to immediate postoperative surgical recovery and that this procedure may have a beneficial effect in reducing postoperative UTI events and their consequences by reducing the postvoid residuals in the early abdominoplasty follow-up. However, we recognize that the series is small and only a longer follow-up with a larger number of patients will allow us to confirm our suppositions. We could not make any statistically significant assumptions regarding differences in renal preservation due to the same limitations.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Infant , Child, Preschool , Child , Adolescent , Abdominal Muscles/surgery , Appendectomy/methods , Prune Belly Syndrome/surgery , Urinary Diversion/methods , Patient Satisfaction , Postoperative Complications , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures , Urinary Catheterization , Urinary Tract Infections/prevention & control
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