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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-914845

ABSTRACT

Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), isoleucine, leucine and valine, are essential amino acids with vital roles in protein synthesis and energy production. We reviewed the fundamentals of BCAA metabolism in advanced cancer patients. BCAAs and various catabolic products act as signalling molecules, which activate mechanisms ranging from protein synthesis to insulin secretion. Recently, BCAA metabolism has been suggested to contribute to cancer progression. Of particular interest is the modulation of the mTOR activity by BCAAs. There are likely multiple pathways involved in BCAA metabolism implicated in carcinogenesis. Understanding the mechanism(s) underlying altered BCAAs metabolism will significantly advance the current understanding of nutrient involvement in carcinogenesis and direct future studies to unravel the significance of BCCA metabolites in tumor development and progression.

2.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-835629

ABSTRACT

A rapid increase in cancer incidence accompanied by aging population requires evidence-based supportive cancer care practices.Cancer therapies often accompany adverse events which induce malnutrition and declined quality of life. We conducted an 8-weeknon-randomized clinical trial to evaluate efficacy of cereal-based oral nutritional supplement (ONS) intervention on nutritional status,quality of life and inflammatory responses in cancer patients undergoing cancer therapy with 5% < weight loss. The study included34 pateints (24 in control group, 10 in intervention group) with 15 drop-outs. ONS used in this intervention contained 0.5% arabinoxylan-rich fermented rice bran powder and 5.5% black rice powder as active ingredients in a regular cereal-based formula. Resultsshowed that ONS intervention for 8 weeks did not show significant improvement in blood biomarkers of nutritional status or patient-generated subjective global assessment scores. However, 8-week of intervention showed reduced interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1bsecretion in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells while IL-12p70 level was increased. For health-relatedquality of life (HRQoL) indices, emotional functioning and fatigue symptoms were improved after 4 weeks only in the interventiongroup although no difference was found at week 8. These results suggest that ONS intervention may improve chronic inflammatorystatus and HRQoL indices (at week 4) in cancer patients receiving treatments.

3.
Gut and Liver ; : 363-369, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-17728

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Studies on the micronutrient status of Asian patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are scarce. We evaluated the prevalence of micronutrient deficiency and verified the risk factors for micronutrient deficiency in Korean patients with IBD. METHODS: We measured the serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25-(OH)D], zinc, and selenium to analyze the clinical risk factors for micronutrient levels below the reference values. In addition, we compared the 25-(OH)D levels of patients with IBD to those of age- and sex-matched healthy controls. RESULTS: Among the 83 patients, 74 (89.2%) had suboptimal serum 25-(OH)D levels. The mean plasma 25-(OH)D level in patients with IBD was significantly reduced compared to that of the healthy controls (12.3±6.2 ng/mL vs 20.0±6.7 ng/mL; p<0.001). The proportions of patients with lower serum zinc and selenium levels were 39.0% and 30.9%, respectively. Female sex (p=0.012) and Crohn’s disease (p=0.012) were associated with vitamin D deficiency. Patients younger than 40 years were at increased risk for zinc deficiency (p=0.045). Female sex (p=0.015) and low serum albumin level (<3.3 g/dL) (p=0.047) were risk factors for selenium deficiency. CONCLUSIONS: Many Korean patients with IBD have vitamin D, zinc, and selenium deficiencies, suggesting the necessity for monitoring levels of these micronutrients.


Subject(s)
Asians , Calcifediol , Female , Humans , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases , Micronutrients , Plasma , Prevalence , Reference Values , Risk Factors , Selenium , Serum Albumin , Vitamin D Deficiency , Vitamin D , Vitamins , Zinc
4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-218778

ABSTRACT

Cancer is currently a leading cause of deaths worldwide and the number of new cases is growing rapidly in both, developed and developing countries. Nutritional management during and after cancer treatment affects treatment efficacy and patient quality of life (QOL). This review systemically examined the effect of oral nutritional interventions on nutritional and clinical outcomes in cancer patients. We especially focused on outcomes such as nutritional status indices, immune-associated biochemical markers, and QOL assessments to provide insights on the applicability of different outcomes. A total of 28 papers were selected for systematic review. The nutritional composition of oral nutritional supplements (ONS), outcome measures, and efficacy of the oral nutritional interventions were summarized and discussed. Most ONS contain 1 or more functional components in addition to basic nutrients. Each study used various outcome measures and significant efficacy was observed for a limited number of measures. Nutritional status indices, QOL measures, and the duration of hospital stay improved in about 40% of the studies. One or more markers of immune function and inflammatory responses were improved by ONS in 65% of the selected studies. These results suggest that appropriate use of ONS may be an ideal way to improve treatment efficacy; however, additional intervention trials are required to confirm these findings.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers , Cause of Death , Developing Countries , Enteral Nutrition , Humans , Length of Stay , Nutritional Status , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Quality of Life , Treatment Outcome
5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-201282

ABSTRACT

There is an error in a grant number in Acknowledgements.

6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-182459

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Excess energy supply induces chronic low-grade inflammation in association with oxidative stress in various tissues including intestinal epithelium. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of high-fat diet (HFD) on intestinal cell membrane integrity and intestinal tumorigenesis in ApcMin/+ mice. METHODS: Mice were fed with either normal diet (ND) or HFD for 12 weeks. The number of intestinal tumors were counted and biomarkers of endotoxemia, oxidative stress, and inflammation were determined. Changes in intestinal integrity was measured by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran penetration and membrane gap junction protein expression. RESULTS: HFD group had significantly higher number of tumors compared to ND group (P < 0.05). Blood total antioxidant capacity was lower in HFD group, while colonic 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine level, a marker of oxidative damage, was higher in HFD group compared to that of ND group (P < 0.05). The penetration of FITC-dextran was substantially increased in HFD group (P < 0.05) while the expressions of membrane gap junction proteins including zonula occludens-1, claudin-1, and occludin were lower in HFD group (P < 0.05) compared to those in ND group. Serum concentration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) receptor (CD14) and colonic toll-like receptor 4 (a LPS receptor) mRNA expression were significantly higher in HFD group than in ND group (P < 0.05), suggesting that significant endotoxemia may occur in HFD group due to the increased membrane permeability. Serum interleukin-6 concentration and myeloperoxidase activity were also higher in HFD group compared to those of ND group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: HFD increases oxidative stress disrupting intestinal gap junction proteins, thereby accelerating membrane permeability endotoxemia, inflammation, and intestinal tumorigenesis.


Subject(s)
Animals , Biomarkers , Carcinogenesis , Cell Membrane , Claudin-1 , Colon , Colonic Neoplasms , Connexins , Diet , Diet, High-Fat , Endotoxemia , Fluorescein , Inflammation , Interleukin-6 , Intestinal Mucosa , Membranes , Mice , Occludin , Oxidative Stress , Permeability , Peroxidase , RNA, Messenger , Toll-Like Receptor 4
7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-71717

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to explore the correlation between usual vitamin K intake and response to anticoagulant therapy among patients under warfarin therapy. We conducted a retrospective survey of patients (n = 50) on continuous warfarin therapy. Clinical information and laboratory parameters were sourced from medical records. Anticoagulant effect was evaluated by using the percent time in therapeutic range (TTR) and the coefficient of variation (CV) of International normalized ratio (INR). Dietary vitamin K intake was assessed using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire that has been developed for the purpose of assessing dietary intake of vitamin K. A total of 50 patients aged between 21 and 87 years were included in the study. The mean vitamin K intake was 262.8 +/- 165.2 microg/day. Study subjects were divided into tertiles according to their usual vitamin K intake. The proportion of men was significantly higher in second and third tertile than first tertile (p = 0.028). The mean percent TTR was 38.4 +/- 28.4% and CV of INR was 31.8 +/- 11.8%. Long-term warfarin therapy group (> or = 3 years) had a higher percentage of TTR as compared to the control group ( 0.05). In conclusion, no significant association was observed between usual vitamin K intake and anticoagulant effects. Further studies are required to consider inter-individual variability of vitamin K intake. Development of assessment tools to measure inter-individual variability of vitamin K intake might be helpful.


Subject(s)
Humans , International Normalized Ratio , Male , Medical Records , Retrospective Studies , Vitamin K , Vitamins , Warfarin
8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-58995

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Obesity is a risk factor of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Estrogen deprivation has been suggested to cause alteration of lipid metabolism thereby creating a cellular microenvironment favoring tumor growth. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of estrogen depletion in combination with excess energy supply on breast tumor development. MATERIALS/METHODS: Ovariectomized (OVX) or sham-operated C3H/HeN mice at 4 wks were provided with either a normal diet or a high-fat diet (HD) for 16 weeks. Breast tumors were induced by administration of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene once a week for six consecutive weeks. RESULTS: Study results showed higher serum concentrations of free fatty acids and insulin in the OVX+HD group compared to other groups. The average tumor volume was significantly larger in OVX+HD animals than in other groups. Expressions of mammary tumor insulin receptor and mammalian target of rapamycin proteins as well as the ratio of pAKT/AKT were significantly increased, while pAMPK/AMPK was decreased in OVX+HD animals compared to the sham-operated groups. Higher relative expression of liver fatty acid synthase mRNA was observed in OVX+HD mice compared with other groups. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that excess energy supply affects the accelerated mammary tumor growth in estrogen deprived mice.


Subject(s)
Animals , Breast Neoplasms , Cellular Microenvironment , Diet , Diet, High-Fat , Estrogens , Fatty Acids, Nonesterified , Female , Humans , Insulin , Lipid Metabolism , Liver , Mice , Obesity , Postmenopause , Receptor, Insulin , Risk Factors , RNA, Messenger , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases , Tumor Burden
9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-112061

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Anthocyanins have been shown to inhibit cancer cell growth by suppressing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an anthocyanin-rich extract (AE) from black soybean coat on intestinal carcinogenesis. METHODS: APC(Min/+) mice were fed a diet of 0.2% or 0.5% AE for 7 weeks. We analyzed the number of intestinal tumors, oxidative stress and inflammatory markers associated with beta-catenin and cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) signals. The number of intestinal tumors, and cellular expression of beta-catenin were determined. RESULTS: The number of intestinal tumors was significantly lower in mice fed a 0.5% AE diet compared to those of the other groups. Cytosolic beta-catenin expression was significantly decreased in the AE supplemented groups compared to that of the control animals. In addition, mucosa expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and cPLA2 were also significantly decreased in the 0.5% AE group, by 32% and 62%, respectively, compared to the control group. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that dietary AE reduced the development of intestinal tumors, possibly through the ability to suppress oxidative stresses, decreasing inflammatory responses mediated by beta-catenin associated signals.


Subject(s)
Animals , Anthocyanins , beta Catenin , Carcinogenesis , Cyclooxygenase 2 , Cytosol , Diet , Inflammation , Intestinal Polyposis , Mice , Mucous Membrane , Oxidative Stress , Phospholipases A2 , Soybeans
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-147482

ABSTRACT

We would like to correct the affiliation for the first author.

11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-125852

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Excess body fat accumulation contributes to the development of metabolic disorders that can cause adverse health effects. Carnosic acid (CA), a major bioactive component of rosemary (Rosemarinus officinalis), has been suggested to possess anti-adipogenic properties. The present study was conducted to elucidate the mechanism underlying the anti-adipogenic effects of CA. METHODS: 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes were treated with CA (0.1, 1, and 10 muM) from day 0 to day 8 of differentiation. On day 8, biochemical markers of lipid accumulation and the degree of fatty acid desaturation were measured. RESULTS: Oil Red O staining results, triglyceride (TG) accumulation, and glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity suggested that CA significantly inhibited lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. CA significantly decreased mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1, and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-alpha in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, it decreased the ratio of both C16:1/C16:0 and C18:1/C18:0, with reduced expression of stearoyl CoA desaturase 1 mRNA and protein. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that CA efficiently suppressed adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and its action, at least in part, is associated with the downregulation of adipogenesis-related genes and the fatty acid composition of TG accumulated in adipocytes.


Subject(s)
Adipocytes , Adipogenesis , Adipose Tissue , Biomarkers , Down-Regulation , Glycerol , Oxidoreductases , Peroxisomes , RNA, Messenger , Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase , Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1 , Triglycerides
12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-36963

ABSTRACT

Recently, it is reported that intervention of oral nutritional supplement improves the nutritional status of cancer patients, and the effectiveness is affected by the sensory preference of cancer patients on the oral nutritional supplement. However, the variety of oral nutritional supplement is extremely limited and the number of patient's benefits from using the products are restricted mostly due to sensory dislikes. The objective of this study was to provide sensory preference score of trial manufactured products with different accessory ingredients to maximize the use of oral nutritional supplements. Cancer patients (n = 30) and age, sex-matched healthy volunteers (n = 30) participated in the sensory assessments (taste, flavor, viscosity, color and overall preference) of three types of oral supplements (cereal base, cereal base+herb and cereal base+fruit) and a control supplement product with scorched cereal flavor, a top seller in current Korean market. Results indicate that the cancer patients' overall preference was significantly higher for the control supplement, and fruit added supplement was preferred over plain cereal and herb added products, although the difference was insignificant. However, there was no significant preference difference for the supplements among the control group for all sensory factors. These results suggest that cancer patients are more sensitive to sensory preferences compared to the control group, and the patients prefer the flavor of cooked cereal which is a staple food in Korea.


Subject(s)
Edible Grain , Fruit , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Korea , Nutritional Status , Viscosity
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-124612

ABSTRACT

Recent studies have suggested a relationship of the increased circulating adipokines and inflammatory cytokine, and the risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS). The objective of this study was to identify adiposity-related factors that reflect MetS in order to establish early intervention targets. We performed a cross-sectional study which included 108 MetS subjects and 91 controls. Blood adiponectin, leptin, vascular-, and intercellular adhension molecules (VCAM, ICAM), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), oxidized LDL (oxLDL), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured. The correlation analysis indicated that the MetS score (sum of the number of MetS risk factors) had an inverse relationship with adiponectin (p < 0.0001), and positive correlations with leptin (p < 0.05), ICAM (p < 0.01), MCP1 (p < 0.05), oxLDL (p < 0.05), TNF-alpha (p < 0.0001), IL-6 (p < 0.05) and hsCRP (p < 0.01). In multivariate logistic regression analyses, plasma triglyceride (TG) was independently associated with adiponectin, ICAM and TNF-alpha with the standardized beta coefficients of -0.213, 0.197, and 0.193, respectively. Plasma HDL-cholesterol was independently associated with ICAM and hsCRP with the standardized beta coefficients of -0.150 and -0.173. Adiponectin, TNF-alpha, and hsCRP were the most proximate markers reflecting MetS. Among MetS components, TG and HDL-cholesterol concentrations displayed the relationship with inflammatory markers measured in this study.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Fat , Adipokines , Adiponectin , Adiposity , Biomarkers , C-Reactive Protein , Chemokine CCL2 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Early Intervention, Educational , Interleukin-6 , Leptin , Logistic Models , Plasma , Triglycerides , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-54660

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Inflammation within the tumor microenvironment has been reported to show an association with poor prognosis in breast cancer. However, the associations may differ according to breast cancer subtype. In this study, we investigated the association between inflammation-related markers and breast cancer recurrence according to patients' tumor subtypes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This prospective study included 240 patients who underwent surgery for management of newly diagnosed breast cancer. Levels of inflammation-related markers (interleukin [IL]-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 [MCP-1], leptin, and adiponectin) were measured at diagnosis, and the associations between these markers and breast cancer recurrence during a six-year follow-up period were examined using the Kaplan-Meier statistical method. RESULTS: Overall, inflammation-related markers showed no association with breast cancer recurrence. However, when data were stratified by tumor subtype, higher levels of some mediators showed an association with poor prognosis among patients with particular subtypes. Compared to patients without recurrence, patients with recurrence had higher levels of circulating IL-6 (p=0.024) and IL-8 (p=0.016) only among those with HER2- tumors and had higher levels of leptin (p=0.034) only among those with estrogen receptor (ER)+/progesterone receptor (PR)+ tumors. Results of survival analyses revealed an association of high levels of IL-6 (p=0.016) and IL-8 (p=0.022) with poor recurrence-free survival in patients with HER2- tumors. In addition, higher leptin levels indicated shorter recurrence-free survival time only among patients with ER+/PR+ tumors (p=0.022). CONCLUSION: We found that certain cytokines could have a differential prognostic impact on breast cancer recurrence according to breast cancer subtype. Conduct of additional large studies will be required in order to elucidate the precise roles of these cytokines in breast cancer progression.


Subject(s)
Breast , Breast Neoplasms , Chemokine CCL2 , Cytokines , Estrogens , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Inflammation , Interleukin-6 , Interleukin-8 , Leptin , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Receptors, Estrogen , Receptors, Progesterone , Recurrence , Tumor Microenvironment
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-167886

ABSTRACT

No abstract available.

16.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-167876

ABSTRACT

High sugar intake has been suggested to be related to hypertension. To examine the associations between intakes of sugar and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and the prevalence of hypertension, we used the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2006. A total of 3,044 participants aged > or =19 years were included. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using multivariate logistic regression model. Prevalent hypertension cases were defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) of > or =140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) of > or =90 mmHg. In the multivariate adjusted models, we observed no association between sugar consumption and the prevalence of hypertension. In the model where we adjusted for age, gender, NHANES period and BMI, those who consumed > or =3 times per day of sugar-sweetened beverages had an OR of 1.87 (95% confidence interval, CI = 1.06-3.26) for the prevalence of hypertension compared with those who consumed or =3 times per day of sugar-sweetened beverages compared to the <1 time per month (p for trend = 0.33). In conclusion, we found that sugar consumption was not associated with the prevalence of hypertension, however there was suggestion that high sugar-sweetened beverage consumption was associated with high prevalence of hypertension in the US.


Subject(s)
Beverages , Blood Pressure , Dietary Sucrose , Hypertension , Logistic Models , Nutrition Surveys , Odds Ratio , Prevalence , United States
17.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-193604

ABSTRACT

Gastric schwannomas are very rare mesenchymal tumors that can occur throughout the gastrointestinal tract, but are most commonly found in the stomach. The majority of patients have no symptoms, while others may complain of epigastric pain or upper gastrointestinal ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic examination of a gastric schwannoma commonly reveals a protrusive mass, but, as in this case, many types of ulceration can be observed with central necrosis. We report on a 62-year-old woman with endoscopic findings of 1 cm sized necrotizing ulceration and an 11 cm sized submucosal mass on radiological examinations. The patient underwent a wedge-shaped resection of the stomach and segmental resection of the transverse colon. Both histological and immunohistochemical staining revealed a gastric schwannoma.


Subject(s)
Colon, Transverse , Endoscopy , Female , Gastrointestinal Tract , Hemorrhage , Humans , Middle Aged , Necrosis , Neurilemmoma , Stomach , Stomach Ulcer , Ulcer
18.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-108698

ABSTRACT

Hyperlipidemia can be a cause of acute pancreatitis. For example, dyslipidemia classified Fredrickson/WHO classification type I, V can induce acute pancreatitis spontaneously. Secondary hyperlipidemia (DM, alcohol, estrogen, etc.) also can induce acute pancreatitis. High serum amylase level and triglyceride level are hall markers of diagnosis. But lactescent serum interferes with accurate laboratory analysis of amylase. Serum amylase was normal or low in 50% of cases. Clinical course and treatment are similar with other causes of acute pancreatitis. Lipoprotein electrophoresis helps classify dyslipidemia by Fredrickson/WHO classification. In some cases, to prevent hyperlipidemic pancreatitis, serum triglyceride should be lower than 500 mg/dl. We report two cases of acute pancreatitis caused by dyslipidemia.


Subject(s)
Amylases , Dyslipidemias , Electrophoresis , Estrogens , Hyperlipidemias , Lipoproteins , Pancreatitis
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-35958

ABSTRACT

The dietary intake of whole grains is known to reduce the incidence of chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. To investigate whether there are anti-adipogenic activities in various Korean cereals, we assessed water extracts of nine cereals. The results showed that treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with Sorghum bicolor L. Moench, Setaria italica Beauvois, or Panicum miliaceum L. extract significantly inhibited adipocyte differentiation, as determined by measuring oil red-O staining, triglyceride accumulation, and glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. Among the nine cereals, P. miliaceum L. showed the highest anti-adipogenic activity. The effects of P. miliaceum L. on mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1, and the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-alpha were evaluated, revealing that the extract significantly decreased the expression of these genes in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, P. miliaceum L. extract changed the ratio of monounsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids in adipocytes, which is related to biological activity and cell characteristics. These results suggest that some cereals efficiently suppress adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In particular, the effect of P. miliaceum L. on adipocyte differentiation is associated with the downregulation of adipogenic genes and fatty acid accumulation in adipocytes.


Subject(s)
3T3-L1 Cells , Adipocytes , Adipogenesis , Cardiovascular Diseases , Edible Grain , Chronic Disease , Down-Regulation , Fatty Acids , Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated , Glycerol , Glycerophosphates , Incidence , Obesity , Oxidoreductases , Panicum , Peroxisomes , RNA, Messenger , Setaria Plant , Sorghum , Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1 , Transcription Factors , Water
20.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-210933

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As a leading cause of death in Korea, cancer is known to be related to lifestyle including diet. In 2007, the World Cancer Research Fund announced 10 evidence-based guidelines for reducing the number of cancers. The purpose of this paper was to produce guidelines specific to and relevant to the people of Korea. METHODS: Ranging over 6 categories, 15 dietary factors known to be associated with cancers were selected after reviewing the results of relevant researches including Korean subjects and evidence-based research documents regarding the relationships between cancer and diet. The levels of intake of these selected dietary factors by Koreans were compared to the established dietary guidelines and detailed practices for cancer prevention. RESULTS: The Korean dietary guidelines for cancer prevention consists of 8 detailed recommendations along with multiple specific practices based on the analyses of data and documents on weight and intake of cereals, fruits, vegetables, meat, salt, dairy products, alcohol, and nutrient supplements. CONCLUSIONS: The Korean dietary guidelines for cancer prevention were established based on valid scientific approach by analyzing the most recent available data. For some dietary factors, however, sufficient analysis for intake levels in Koreans was not possible. Therefore, fundamental data for the establishment of national strategy and for guideline amendments for preventing cancers need to be gathered through the analyses of relationships between cause and deaths due to cancer, database reinforcement, additional research including Korean subjects, and assessment of usual intake.


Subject(s)
Cause of Death , Edible Grain , Dairy Products , Diet , Financial Management , Fruit , Korea , Life Style , Meat , Nutrition Policy , Reinforcement, Psychology , Vegetables
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