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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-913500

ABSTRACT

Objective@#To investigate long-term and serial functional outcomes in ischemic stroke patients without diabetes with post-stroke hyperglycemia. @*Methods@#The Korean Stroke Cohort for Functioning and Rehabilitation (KOSCO) is a large, multi-center, prospective cohort study of stroke patients admitted to participating hospitals in nine areas of Korea. From KOSCO, ischemic stroke patients without diabetes were recruited and divided into two groups: patients without diabetes without (n=779) and with post-stroke hyperglycemia (n=223). Post-stroke hyperglycemia was defined as a glucose level >8 mmol/L. Functional assessments were performed 7 days and 3, 6, and 12 months after stroke onset. @*Results@#There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the groups, except in the age of onset and smoking. Analysis of the linear correlation between the initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score and glucose level showed no significant difference. Among our functional assessments, NIHSS, Fugl-Meyer Assessment (affected side), Functional Ambulatory Category, modified Rankin Scale, and Korean Mini-Mental State Examination (K-MMSE) showed statistically significant improvements in each group. All functional improvements except K-MMSE were significantly higher in patients without post-stroke hyperglycemia at 7 days and 3, 6, and 12 months. @*Conclusion@#The glucose level of ischemic stroke patients without diabetes had no significant correlation with the initial NIHSS score. The long-term effects of stress hyperglycemia showed worse functional outcomes in ischemic stroke patients without diabetes with post-stroke hyperglycemia.

2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-897403

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study is to investigate the changes in functional independence and their associated factors during the first 6 months to 1 year after stroke onset. This study is the interim results of the Korean Stroke Cohort for Functioning and Rehabilitation. A total of 1,011 participants were included and classified into 3 subgroups according to changes in the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI) scores that occurred between 6 months to 1 year after stroke onset: the improved group (IG), with scores that increased 5 points or more; the stationary group (SG), with the K-MBI score changes ranging from −4 to +4 points; and the declined group (DG), with the K-MBI scores that decreased 5 points or more. Ordinal logistic regression analyses were used to assess the factors influencing changes in the K-MBI score. Among 1,011 patient, 436 patients (43.1%), 398 patients (39.4%) and 117 patients (17.5%) were classified into the IG, SG, and DG, respectively. Obesity and Geriatric Depression Scale score were significant influencing factors for changes in the K-MBI scores. Obesity showed a positive influence on the K-MBI score, while depression showed a negative influence.

3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-897398

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study was to investigate factors affecting the return home one year after a stroke. The subjects of this study consisted of patients who participated in a large-scale multi-objective cohort study of initial stage stroke patients who were admitted to 9 representative hospitals in Korea. We analyzed the distribution of the subjects who had experienced stroke a year earlier by distinguishing the group who returned home and the other group that was hospitalized in rehabilitation hospitals. Based on this distribution, we evaluated the demographic, environmental, clinical, and psychological factors that can affect the return home. Overall, there were 464 subjects in the ‘Return home’ group and 99 subjects in the ‘Rehabilitation hospitalization’ group. job status, inconvenient housing structures, residential types, diagnosis, Functional Ambulation Categories, modified Rankin Scale, Korea-Modified Barthel Index, Function Independence Measure, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Korean version of Mini-Mental State Examination, Korean version of Frenchay Aphasia Screening Test, Psychosocial Well-being Index-Short Form, Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form, EuroQol-five Dimensional showed a significant difference between the 2 groups one year after the stroke. The factors affecting the return home one year after a stroke include functional status, activities of daily living, cognition, depression, stress, quality of life, job status. It is expected that factors affecting the rehabilitation of patients with stroke can be considered as basic data for establishing rehabilitation goals and treatment plans.

4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-889699

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study is to investigate the changes in functional independence and their associated factors during the first 6 months to 1 year after stroke onset. This study is the interim results of the Korean Stroke Cohort for Functioning and Rehabilitation. A total of 1,011 participants were included and classified into 3 subgroups according to changes in the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI) scores that occurred between 6 months to 1 year after stroke onset: the improved group (IG), with scores that increased 5 points or more; the stationary group (SG), with the K-MBI score changes ranging from −4 to +4 points; and the declined group (DG), with the K-MBI scores that decreased 5 points or more. Ordinal logistic regression analyses were used to assess the factors influencing changes in the K-MBI score. Among 1,011 patient, 436 patients (43.1%), 398 patients (39.4%) and 117 patients (17.5%) were classified into the IG, SG, and DG, respectively. Obesity and Geriatric Depression Scale score were significant influencing factors for changes in the K-MBI scores. Obesity showed a positive influence on the K-MBI score, while depression showed a negative influence.

5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-889694

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study was to investigate factors affecting the return home one year after a stroke. The subjects of this study consisted of patients who participated in a large-scale multi-objective cohort study of initial stage stroke patients who were admitted to 9 representative hospitals in Korea. We analyzed the distribution of the subjects who had experienced stroke a year earlier by distinguishing the group who returned home and the other group that was hospitalized in rehabilitation hospitals. Based on this distribution, we evaluated the demographic, environmental, clinical, and psychological factors that can affect the return home. Overall, there were 464 subjects in the ‘Return home’ group and 99 subjects in the ‘Rehabilitation hospitalization’ group. job status, inconvenient housing structures, residential types, diagnosis, Functional Ambulation Categories, modified Rankin Scale, Korea-Modified Barthel Index, Function Independence Measure, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Korean version of Mini-Mental State Examination, Korean version of Frenchay Aphasia Screening Test, Psychosocial Well-being Index-Short Form, Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form, EuroQol-five Dimensional showed a significant difference between the 2 groups one year after the stroke. The factors affecting the return home one year after a stroke include functional status, activities of daily living, cognition, depression, stress, quality of life, job status. It is expected that factors affecting the rehabilitation of patients with stroke can be considered as basic data for establishing rehabilitation goals and treatment plans.

6.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-811451

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to investigate the effect of hospital-based intensive rehabilitation program after ankle ligament operation.METHODS: A total of 35 patients were included in this randomized controlled trial. Fifty-minute sessions of hospital-based rehabilitation were performed three times weekly for 12 weeks in the intervention group. Home-based exercise was conducted in the control group. Outcomes were evaluated at baseline, 12 weeks, and 16 weeks. The primary outcome was measured using the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS). Secondary outcomes included the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score, ankle strength measured using an isokinetic device, fall index measured using a Tetrax posturography device, and the Berg Balance Scale.RESULTS: Significant improvements in FAOS, AOFAS, ankle strength, and fall index were found in the intervention group after performing the hospital-based rehabilitation (all p<0.05) and these improvements were sustained at T2 (all p<0.05). Between-group comparisons demonstrated significantly greater improvements in FAOS, AOFAS, ankle strength, and fall index in the intervention group than those in the control group at both T1 (all p<0.05), and T2 (all p<0.05).CONCLUSION: The rehabilitation program in this study improved postoperative pain, sports function, quality of life, and strength and balance of the ankle significantly better than home-based self-care. Therefore, we recommend hospital-based systematic rehabilitation programs after surgical treatment for chronic ankle instability.


Subject(s)
Ankle , Foot , Humans , Ligaments , Orthopedics , Pain, Postoperative , Quality of Life , Recovery of Function , Rehabilitation , Self Care , Sports
7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-785553

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study was to investigate factors affecting the return home one year after a stroke. The subjects of this study consisted of patients who participated in a large-scale multi-objective cohort study of initial stage stroke patients who were admitted to 9 representative hospitals in Korea. We analyzed the distribution of the subjects who had experienced stroke a year earlier by distinguishing the group who returned home and the other group that was hospitalized in rehabilitation hospitals. Based on this distribution, we evaluated the demographic, environmental, clinical, and psychological factors that can affect the return home. Overall, there were 464 subjects in the ‘Return home’ group and 99 subjects in the ‘Rehabilitation hospitalization’ group. job status, inconvenient housing structures, residential types, diagnosis, Functional Ambulation Categories, modified Rankin Scale, Korea-Modified Barthel Index, Function Independence Measure, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Korean version of Mini-Mental State Examination, Korean version of Frenchay Aphasia Screening Test, Psychosocial Well-being Index-Short Form, Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form, EuroQol-five Dimensional showed a significant difference between the 2 groups one year after the stroke. The factors affecting the return home one year after a stroke include functional status, activities of daily living, cognition, depression, stress, quality of life, job status. It is expected that factors affecting the rehabilitation of patients with stroke can be considered as basic data for establishing rehabilitation goals and treatment plans.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living , Aphasia , Cognition , Cohort Studies , Depression , Diagnosis , Housing , Humans , Korea , Mass Screening , Patient Discharge , Psychology , Quality of Life , Rehabilitation , Stroke , Walking
9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-739326

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility and therapeutic effects of a novel concept hand rehabilitation device based on magnetics for subacute stroke patients with hand motor impairment. We developed an end effector type device that can induce various movements of the fingers in accordance with a magnetic field direction using electromagnets and permanent magnets. Subacute stroke patients with hand motor impairments were recruited and divided into two rehabilitation groups. Conventional rehabilitation therapies were also conducted equally in both groups. Active-assisted training of the affected hand was additionally administered for 30 minutes per day for 4 weeks using the developed equipment in the intervention group. Hand motor function and the activities of daily living were evaluated before and after the intervention. The Manual Function Test score significantly increased in the intervention group after 4 weeks of treatment (p = 0.039), and there was a significant difference in the degree of improvement between the two groups (p = 0.016). The scores of the motor Fugl-Meyer Assessment of the upper limb, the Wolf Motor Function Test score and time, and the motor Functional Independence Measure also improved in both groups (all p < 0.05). In addition, the patients in the intervention group showed greater improvements in these outcome measures than those in the control group did (all p < 0.05). An adjuvant rehabilitation therapy using a magnetic based device can be helpful to improve the hand motor function and activities of daily life in subacute stroke patients.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living , Fingers , Hand , Humans , Magnetic Fields , Magnets , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pilot Projects , Rehabilitation , Robotics , Stroke , Therapeutic Uses , Upper Extremity , Wolves
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-719299

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Few studies have investigated the relationship between the specific functional factors potentially associated with functional level and stroke recurrence. We conducted a study of patients with noncardioembolic ischemic stroke (NCIS) to determine the functional factors affecting recurrence within the first year. METHODS: In total, 568 first-ever NCIS patients (age=65.1±17.4 years, mean±SD) were analyzed in a multicenter, prospective cohort study registered from August 2012. Demographic characteristics, past medical history, comorbidities, laboratory data, stroke features in neuroimaging, acute treatments, and medications at discharge were assessed. Functional factors reflecting gross functional impairment, ambulatory function, motor function, activities of daily living, cognition, language ability, swallowing function, mood, and quality of life were comprehensively evaluated in face-to-face assessments using standardized tools at the time of discharge. RESULTS: The cumulative incidence of stroke recurrence in NCIS was 6.0% (n=34) at 1 year. The period from admission to discharge was 34.4±7.0 days. The independent predictors of stroke recurrence within 1 year in multivariate Cox proportional-hazards regression analyses were 1) age [per-year hazard ratio (HR)=1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.97–1.06, p=0.048], 2) Charlson Comorbidity Index higher than 2 (HR=1.72, 95% CI=1.26–2.22, p=0.016), 3) modified Rankin Scale score of 3 or more at discharge (HR=1.56, 95% CI=1.22–1.94, p=0.032), and 4) Functional Ambulation Category of 3 or less at discharge (HR=2.56, 95% CI=1.84–3.31, p=0.008). CONCLUSIONS: In addition to patient age, moderate-to-severe functional impairment requiring the help of others (especially for ambulation) at the time of discharge and the severity of comorbidity were independent predictors of stroke recurrence within 1 year of the first NCIS.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living , Cognition , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Deglutition , Disability Evaluation , Humans , Incidence , Language , Neuroimaging , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life , Recurrence , Rehabilitation , Stroke , Walking
11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-714954

ABSTRACT

The Korean Association of Medical Colleges (KAMC) developed graduate outcomes based on “The role of Korean doctor, 2014” to serve as guidelines regarding outcome-based education in Korea. The working group in this study analyzed 65 competencies proposed in “The role of Korean doctor, 2014” according to the developmental principle that certain outcomes should be demonstrated at the point of entry into the graduate medical education. We established 34 competencies as “preliminary graduate outcomes” (PGOs). The advisory committee consisted of 11 professors, who reviewed the validity of PGOs. Ultimately, a total of 19 “revised graduate outcomes” (RGOs) were selected. We modified the RGOs based on opinions from medical schools and a public hearing. In November 2017, the KAMC announced the “graduate outcomes for basic medical education,” which serves as a guide for basic medical education for the 40 medical schools throughout Korea. Medical schools can expand the graduate outcomes according to their educational goals and modify them according to their own context. We believe that graduate outcomes can be a starting point for connecting basic medical education to graduate medical education.


Subject(s)
Advisory Committees , Competency-Based Education , Education , Education, Medical , Education, Medical, Graduate , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Hearing , Korea , Physician's Role , Republic of Korea , Schools, Medical
12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-716986

ABSTRACT

Neuro-Behcet's disease (NBD) is rare, but it is the most serious complication of Behcet's disease, a vasculitis and multisystem inflammatory syndrome. NBD causes a variety of neurological deficits depending on the affected structure in the brain; cognitive impairment, motor weakness, ataxia, and dysphagia significantly affect functioning in independent life. Although steroid therapy usually ameliorates NBD symptoms, its therapeutic effects are limited to the chronic progressive type. In NBD patients with frequent recurrences, comprehensive rehabilitation can help to improve activities of daily living and neurological symptoms.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living , Ataxia , Behcet Syndrome , Brain , Cognition Disorders , Deglutition Disorders , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Recurrence , Rehabilitation , Therapeutic Uses , Vasculitis
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-18250

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the accuracy of a smartphone application measuring heart rates (HRs), during an exercise and discussed clinical potential of the smartphone application for cardiac rehabilitation exercise programs. METHODS: Patients with heart disease (14 with myocardial infarction, 2 with angina pectoris) were recruited. Exercise protocol was comprised of a resting stage, Bruce stage II, Bruce stage III, and a recovery stage. To measure HR, subjects held smartphone in their hands and put the tip of their index finger on the built-in camera for 1 minute at each exercise stage such as resting stage, Bruce stage II, Bruce stage III, and recovery stage. The smartphones recorded photoplethysmography signal and HR was calculated every heart beat. HR data obtained from the smartphone during the exercise protocol was compared with the HR data obtained from a Holter electrocardiography monitor (control). RESULTS: In each exercise protocol stage (resting stage, Bruce stage II, Bruce stage III, and the recovery stage), the HR averages obtained from a Holter monitor were 76.40±12.73, 113.09±14.52, 115.64±15.15, and 81.53±13.08 bpm, respectively. The simultaneously measured HR averages obtained from a smartphone were 76.41±12.82, 112.38±15.06, 115.83±15.36, and 81.53±13 bpm, respectively. The intraclass correlation coefficient (95% confidence interval) was 1.00 (1.00–1.00), 0.99 (0.98–0.99), 0.94 (0.83–0.98), and 1.00 (0.99–1.00) in resting stage, Bruce stage II, Bruce stage III, and recovery stage, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the HRs measured by either device at each stage (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: The accuracy of measured HR from a smartphone was almost overlapped with the measurement from the Holter monitor in resting stage and recovery stage. However, we observed that the measurement error increased as the exercise intensity increased.


Subject(s)
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory , Fingers , Hand , Heart Diseases , Heart Rate , Heart , Humans , Male , Myocardial Infarction , Myocardial Ischemia , Photoplethysmography , Rehabilitation , Smartphone
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-191582

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence and risk factors for medical complications in Korean patients suffering from stroke and the impact of such complications on post-stroke functional outcomes. METHODS: We assessed patients enrolled in a prospective cohort study. All recruited patients had suffered a first acute stroke episode and been admitted to nine university hospitals in Korea between August 2012 and June 2015. We analyzed patient and stroke characteristics, comorbidities, prevalence of post-stroke medical complications, and functional outcomes at time of discharge and 3, 6, and 12 months after stroke onset. RESULTS: Of 10,625 patients with acute stroke, 2,210 (20.8%) presented with medical complications including bladder dysfunction, bowel dysfunction, sleep disturbance, pneumonia, and urinary tract infection. In particular, complications occurred more frequently in older patients and in patients with hemorrhagic strokes, more co-morbidities, severe initial motor impairment, or poor swallowing function. In-hospital medical complications were significantly correlated with poor functional outcomes at all time points. CONCLUSION: Post-stroke medical complications affect functional recovery. The majority of complications are preventable and treatable; therefore, the functional outcomes of patients with stroke can be improved by providing timely, appropriate care. Special care should be provided to elderly patients with comorbid risk factors.


Subject(s)
Aged , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Deglutition , Hospitals, University , Humans , Incidence , Korea , Pneumonia , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Rehabilitation , Risk Factors , Stroke , Urinary Bladder , Urinary Tract Infections
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-224017

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the characteristics and risk factors of dysphagia with the Videofluoroscopic Dysphagia Scale (VDS) using a videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) in patients with ruptured aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). METHODS: Data of 64 patients presenting with first-ever ruptured aSAH were analyzed. Characteristics of dysphagia were evaluated using VFSS and all subjects were divided into a high (>47) and low risk group (≤47) by the VDS score. Clinical and functional parameters were assessed by medical records including demographics, hypertension and diabetes mellitus (DM), the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), the Hunt and Hess scale, endotracheal intubation, acute management modalities, as well as Korean version of the Mini-Mental Status Examination (K-MMSE) and Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI). Radiologic factors identified the amount of hemorrhage, ventricular rupture, and aneurysmal location. RESULTS: About a half of the subjects showed oral phase abnormalities and the oral transit time was delayed in 46.8% of the patients. The pharyngeal transit time was also prolonged in 39.0% of the subjects and the proportion of penetration and aspiration observed was 46.8%. The parameters-GCS score (p=0.048), hemorrhagic volume (p=0.028), presence of intraventricular hemorrhage (p=0.038), and K-MMSE (p=0.007)-were predisposing factors for dysphagia in patients with aSAH. CONCLUSION: Abnormalities in the oral phase were more prominent in patients with aSAH than in those with other types of stroke. The risk factors associated with dysphagia persisting over 6 months after stroke onset were the initial GCS, hemorrhage volume, presence of intraventricular hemorrhage, and cognitive status as measured by the K-MMSE.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Aneurysm, Ruptured , Causality , Deglutition , Deglutition Disorders , Demography , Diabetes Mellitus , Fluoroscopy , Glasgow Coma Scale , Hemorrhage , Humans , Hypertension , Intubation, Intratracheal , Medical Records , Risk Factors , Rupture , Stroke , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
16.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-39562

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of hippotherapy on psychosocial and emotional parameters in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and their caregivers. METHODS: Eight children with CP were recruited (three males and five females; mean age, 7.3 years; Gross Motor Function Classification System levels 1-3). Hippotherapy sessions were conducted for 30 minutes once weekly for 10 consecutive weeks in an indoor riding arena. The Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM), Pediatric Balance Scale (PBS), and the Korean version of the Modified Barthel Index were evaluated. All children were evaluated by the Children's Depression Inventory, Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children, State Anxiety Inventory for Children, Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale, and the Korean-Satisfaction with Life Scale (K-SWLS). Their caregivers were evaluated with the Beck Depression Inventory, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and the K-SWLS. We assessed children and their caregivers with the same parameters immediately after hippotherapy. RESULTS: Significant improvements on the GMFM, dimension E in the GMFM, and the PBS were observed after hippotherapy compared with the baseline assessment (p<0.05). However, no improvements were detected in the psychosocial or emotional parameters in children with CP or their caregivers. None of the participants showed any adverse effects or accidents during the 10 weeks hippotherapy program. CONCLUSIONS: Hippotherapy was safe and effectively improved gross motor and balance domains in children with CP. However, no improvements were observed in psychosocial or emotional parameters.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Caregivers , Cerebral Palsy , Child , Classification , Depression , Equine-Assisted Therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Pilot Projects , Self Concept
17.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-25322

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to investigate prevalence and risk factors associated with spasticity at 3 months after a first-ever stroke in Korean patients. This cohort study included consecutive patients with first-ever stroke who were admitted to 9 participated hospitals in different areas of Korea. The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), which defines spasticity as MAS > 1 in any of the examined joints was used to assess patients 3 months after stroke occurrence. The prevalence of spasticity was 7.3% (339 of 4,658 patients), 3 months after stroke onset. Spasticity was more frequent in upper extremity (6.7%) than lower extremity (4.3%). Severity of spasticity was as follows: 63.1%: MAS I, 23.3%: MAS I+, 9.4%: MAS II, 2.6%: MAS III, and 1.4%: MAS IV. Stroke type (hemorrhagic) (p < 0.05) were identified as correlated risk factors. Patients with spasticity scored higher with National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and lower with modified Rankin Scale (mRS) than non-spastic patients (p < 0.001). This study showed 7.3% prevalence of spasticity in Korean first-ever stroke patients at 3 months, and identified those who carried higher risks of developing spasticity who would particularly benefit from preventive or therapeutic strategies. It would contribute to assessing spasticity in patients with first-ever stroke in Korea.


Subject(s)
Cohort Studies , Humans , Joints , Korea , Lower Extremity , Muscle Spasticity , Prevalence , Rehabilitation , Risk Factors , Stroke , Upper Extremity
18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-25320

ABSTRACT

The objective was to investigate the effects of the intensive inpatient rehabilitation treatment during subacute phase to reduce disabilities at chronic phase in patients with first-ever stroke. This study presents interim results of the Korean Stroke Cohort for Functioning and Rehabilitation (KOSCO). Stroke patients who transferred to the rehabilitation department during the 1st hospitalization were classified into the intensive rehabilitation group, and the other stroke patients were classified into the nonintensive rehabilitation group. Disability grade at subacute phase and 6 months after stroke was defined using the Korean modified Barthel Index (K-MBI). The change of disability grade at chronic phase was analyzed by the intensive inpatient rehabilitation treatment. A total of 5,380 first-ever stroke patients were included in this analysis. Among these 5,380 patients, 1,162 and 4,218 patients were classified into the intensive rehabilitation group and the non-intensive rehabilitation group, respectively. The proportion of patients to improve the disability grade at 6 months after stroke was significantly higher in the intensive rehabilitation group than the non-intensive rehabilitation group with severe functional impairment at subacute phase (p < 0.05). This study revealed that the intensive inpatient rehabilitation treatment during subacute stage could significantly improve the disability grade at chronic phase in first-ever stroke patients.


Subject(s)
Cohort Studies , Hospitalization , Humans , Inpatients , Rehabilitation , Stroke
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-156747

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the diagnostic value of plain abdominal radiography in stroke patients with bowel dysfunction. METHODS: A total of 59 stroke patients were recruited and assigned into constipation or non-constipation group. Patients were interviewed to obtain clinical information, constipation score, and Bristol stool form scale. The total and segmental colon transit time (CTT) was measured using radio-opaque markers (Kolomark). The degree of stool retention was evaluated by plain abdominal radiography and scored by two different methods (Starreveld score and Leech score). The relationship between the clinical aspects, CTT, and stool retention score using plain abdominal radiography was determined. RESULTS: Average constipation score was 4.59+/-2.16. Average Bristol stool form scale was 3.86+/-1.13. The total and segmental CTTs showed significant differences between the constipation and non-constipation groups. There was statistically significant (p<0.05) correlation between the total CTT and constipation score or between Starreveld score and Leech score. Each segmental CTT showed significant correlation (p<0.05) between segmental stool retention scores. CONCLUSION: The stool retention score showed significant correlation with constipation score as well as total and segmental CTT. Thus, plain abdominal radiography is a simple and convenient method for the evaluation of bowel dysfunction in stroke patients.


Subject(s)
Colon , Constipation , Humans , Radiography, Abdominal , Stroke
20.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-47934

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the long-term outcomes of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) on exercise capacity in diabetic (DM) and non-diabetic (non-DM) patients with myocardial infarction (MI). METHODS: Of the MI patients who received hospital-based CR from February 2012 to January 2014, we retrospectively reviewed the medical records of the patients who continued follow-up through the outpatient clinic and community-based self-exercise after CR. A total of 37 patients (12 with DM and 25 without DM) were included in this study. Exercise capacity was measured by symptom-limited exercise tests before and after hospital-based CR and 1 year after the onset of MI. RESULTS: Before the CR, the DM group had significantly lower exercise capacity in exercise times, peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak), and metabolic equivalent tasks (METs) than did the non-DM group. After the CR, both groups showed significantly improved exercise capacity, but the DM group had significantly lower exercise capacity in exercise times, submaximal rate pressure products (RPPsubmax), VO2peak, and METs. One year after the onset of the MI, the DM group had significantly lower exercise capacity in exercise times, RPPsubmax, and VO2peak than did the non-DM group, and neither group showed a significant difference in exercise capacity between before and after the CR. CONCLUSION: As a result of continued follow-up through an outpatient clinic and community-based self-exercise after hospital-based CR in patients with MI, the DM group still had lower exercise capacity than did the non-DM group 1 year after the onset of MI, but both groups maintained their improved exercise capacity following hospital-based CR.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities , Diabetes Mellitus , Exercise Test , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Medical Records , Metabolic Equivalent , Myocardial Infarction , Oxygen Consumption , Rehabilitation , Retrospective Studies
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