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1.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 48(2): 363-364, March-Apr. 2022.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1364954

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Background: Reports in the literature describe lymphocele formation in up to half of patients following pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) (1) in robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP), with 1-2% requiring intervention (2). The advantage of surgical approach is permanent excision of the lymphocele capsule and fewer days with pelvic drains compared to percutaneous drainage. This study aims to describe the step-by-step surgical management of symptomatic lymphoceles using a less invasive robotic platform, the Da Vinci® Single Port (SP). Material and Methods: We describe the technique of lymphocelectomy and marsupialization with the Da Vinci® SP for symptomatic lymphocele. For this study, several treatment modalities for symptomatic lymphoceles were available, including percutaneous drainage, sclerosing agents, and surgical marsupialization. All the data for this study were obtained through the procedure via Da Vinci® SP. Results: Operative time for the case was 84 minutes. Blood loss was 25ml. No intra- or post- operative complications were reported. The patient had his drain removed in under 24 hours after surgery. The mean follow-up period was 7.7 months. There were no complications or lymphocele recurrence. Conclusion: Da Vinci® SP lymphocelectomy is safe and feasible with satisfactory outcomes. The SP enables definitive treatment of the lymphocele sac (3), reducing the number of days with abdominal drains and allows further decrease in surgical invasiveness with fewer incisions and better cosmesis.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Robotics , Lymphocele/surgery , Lymphocele/etiology , Robotic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Prostatectomy/methods , Drainage/adverse effects , Drainage/methods , Lymph Node Excision/methods
2.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 48(2): 212-219, March-Apr. 2022. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1364948

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Despite the neuroanatomy knowledge of the prostate described initially in the 1980's and the robotic surgery advantages in terms of operative view magnification, potency outcomes following robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy still challenge surgeons and patients due to its multifactorial etiology. Recent studies performed in our center have described that, in addition to the surgical technique, some important factors are associated with erectile dysfunction (ED) following robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). These include preoperative Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) score, age, preoperative Gleason score, and Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). After performing 15,000 cases, in this article we described our current Robotic-assisted Radical Prostatectomy technique with details and considerations regarding the optimal approach to neurovascular bundle preservation.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Prostatic Neoplasms/surgery , Prostatic Neoplasms/complications , Robotic Surgical Procedures/methods , Erectile Dysfunction/etiology , Erectile Dysfunction/prevention & control , Prostate/surgery , Prostatectomy/adverse effects , Prostatectomy/methods , Treatment Outcome
3.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 48(2): 369-370, March-Apr. 2022.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1364947

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction: Over the years, since Binder and Kramer described the first Robotic-assisted Radical Prostatectomy (RARP) in 2000, different Nerve-sparing (NS) techniques have been proposed by several authors (1). However, even with the robotic surgery advantages, functional outcomes following RARP, especially erection recovery, still challenge surgeons and patients (2, 3). In this scenario, we have described different ways and grades of neurovascular bundle preservation (NVB) using the prostatic artery as a landmark until our most recent technique with lateral prostatic fascia preservation and modified apical dissection (4-6). In this video compilation, we have illustrated the anatomical and technical details of different grades of NVB preservation. Surgical technique: After the anterior and posterior bladder neck dissection, we lift the prostate by the seminal vesicles to access the posterior aspect of the prostate. Then, we incise the Denonvilliers layers and work between an avascular plane to release the posterior NVB from 5 to 1 and 7 to 11 o'clock positions on the right and left sides, respectively6. In sequence, we access the prostate anteriorly by incising the endopelvic fascia bilaterally (close to the prostate) until communicating the anterior and posterior planes. Finally, we control the prostatic pedicles with Hem-o-lok clips and then proceed for the apical dissection preserving the maximum amount of urethra length and periurethral tissues. Considerations: Potency recovery following radical prostatectomy remains a challenge due to its multifactorial etiology. However, basic concepts for nerve-sparing are crucial to achieving optimal outcomes, such as minimizing the amount of traction used on dissection, avoiding excessive cautery, and neural preservation based on anatomical landmarks (arteries and planes of dissection).


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Prostatic Neoplasms/surgery , Robotic Surgical Procedures , Prostate/surgery , Prostatectomy/methods , Penile Erection
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