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1.
Journal of Stroke ; : 113-123, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-874951

ABSTRACT

Background@#and Purpose To evaluate the outcome events and bleeding complications of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guideline-matched oral anticoagulant therapy for patients with acute ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation (AF). @*Methods@#Patients with acute ischemic stroke and AF from a nationwide multicenter registry (Korean ATrial fibrillaTion EvaluatioN regisTry in Ischemic strOke patieNts [K-ATTENTION]) between January 2013 and December 2015 were included in the study. Patients were divided into the ESC guideline-matched and the non-matched groups. The primary outcome was recurrence of any stroke during the 90-day follow-up period. Secondary outcomes were major adverse cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events, ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage, acute coronary syndrome, allcause mortality, and major hemorrhage. Propensity score matching and logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the effect of the treatments administered. @*Results@#Among 2,321 eligible patients, 1,126 patients were 1:1 matched to the ESC guidelinematched and the non-matched groups. As compared with the non-matched group, the ESC guideline-matched group had a lower risk of any recurrent stroke (1.4% vs. 3.4%; odds ratio [OR], 0.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18 to 0.95). The risk of recurrent ischemic stroke was lower in the ESC guideline-matched group than in the non-matched group (0.9% vs. 2.7%; OR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.11 to 0.88). There was no significant difference in the other secondary outcomes between the two groups. @*Conclusions@#ESC guideline-matched oral anticoagulant therapy was associated with reduced risks of any stroke and ischemic stroke as compared with the non-matched therapy.

2.
Journal of Stroke ; : 1-10, 2020.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-834647

ABSTRACT

Systemic cancer and ischemic stroke are common conditions and two of the most frequent causes of death among the elderly. The association between cancer and stroke has been reported worldwide. Stroke causes severe disability for cancer patients, while cancer increases the risk of stroke. Moreover, cancer-related stroke is expected to increase due to advances in cancer treatment and an aging population worldwide. Because cancer and stroke share risk factors (such as smoking and obesity) and treatment of cancer can increase the risk of stroke (e.g., accelerated atherosclerosis after radiation therapy), cancer may accelerate conventional stroke mechanisms (i.e., atherosclerosis, small vessel disease, and cardiac thrombus). In addition, active cancer and chemotherapy may enhance thrombin generation causing stroke related to coagulopathy. Patients with stroke due to cancer-related coagulopathy showed the characteristics findings of etiologic work ups, D-dimer levels, and infarct patterns. In this review, we summarized the frequency of cancer-related stroke among patients with ischemic stroke, mechanisms of stroke with in cancer patients, and evaluation and treatment of cancer-related stroke. We discussed the possibility of cancer-related stroke as a stroke subtype, and presented the most recent discoveries in the pathomechanisms and treatment of stroke due to cancer-related coagulopathy.

3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-785398

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Differences in the performance of suggested warfarin dosing algorithms among different ethnicities and genotypes have been reported; this necessitates the development of an algorithm with enhanced performance for specific population groups. Previous warfarin dosing algorithms underestimated warfarin doses in VKORC1 1173C carriers. We aimed to develop and validate a new warfarin dosing algorithm for Korean patients with VKORC1 1173C.METHODS: A total of 109 patients carrying VKORC1 1173CT (N=105) or 1173CC (N=4) were included in this study. Multiple regression analysis was performed to deduce a new dosing algorithm. Following literature searches for genotype-guided warfarin dosing algorithms, 21 algorithms were selected and evaluated using the correlation coefficient (ρ) of actual dose and estimated dose, mean error, and root mean square error.RESULTS: The developed algorithm is as follows: maintenance dose (mg/week)=exp [3.223−0.009×(age)+0.577×(body surface area [BSA])+0.178×(sex)−0.481×(CYP2C9 genotype)+0.227×(VKORC1 genotype)]. Integrated variables explained 44% of the variance in the maintenance dose. The predicted and actual doses showed moderate correlation (ρ=0.641) with the best performance with a mean error of −1.30 mg/week. The proportion of underestimated groups was 17%, which was lower than with the other algorithms.CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to develop and validate a warfarin dosing algorithm based on data from VKORC1 1173C carriers; it showed superior predictive performance compared with previously published algorithms.


Subject(s)
Genotype , Humans , Korea , Population Groups , Warfarin
4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-764361

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The clinical implications of echocardiography findings for long-term outcomes in atrial fibrillation (AF)-related stroke patients are unknown. METHODS: This was a substudy of the Korean ATrial fibrillaTion EvaluatioN regisTry in Ischemic strOke patieNts (K-ATTENTION), which is a multicenter-based cohort comprising prospective stroke registries from 11 tertiary centers. Stroke survivors who underwent two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography during hospitalization were enrolled. Echocardiography markers included the left-ventricle (LV) ejection fraction (LVEF), the left atrium diameter, and the ratio of the peak transmitral filling velocity to the mean mitral annular velocity during early diastole (E/e′ ratio). LVEF was categorized into normal (≥55%), mildly decreased (>40% and <55%), and severely decreased (≤40%). The E/e′ ratio associated with the LV filling pressure was categorized into normal (<8), borderline (≥8 and <15), and elevated (≥15). Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were performed for recurrent stroke, major adverse cardiac events, and all-cause death. RESULTS: This study finally included 1,947 patients. Over a median follow-up of 1.65 years (interquartile range, 0.42–2.87 years), the rates of recurrent stroke, major adverse cardiac events, and all-cause death were 35.1, 10.8, and 69.6 cases per 1,000 person-years, respectively. Multivariable analyses demonstrated that severely decreased LVEF was associated with a higher risks of major adverse cardiac events [hazard ratio (HR), 3.91; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.58–9.69] and all-cause death (HR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.23–3.10). The multivariable fractional polynomial plot indicated that recurrent stroke might be associated with a lower LVEF. CONCLUSIONS: Severe LV systolic dysfunction could be a determinant of long-term outcomes in AF-related stroke.


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation , Cohort Studies , Diastole , Echocardiography , Follow-Up Studies , Heart Atria , Hospitalization , Humans , Prospective Studies , Registries , Stroke , Survivors
5.
Journal of Stroke ; : 332-339, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-766258

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To investigate the number and characteristics of patients eligible for endovascular treatment (EVT) determined using three different selection methods: clinical-core mismatch, target mismatch, and collateral status. METHODS: Using the data of consecutive patients from two prospectively maintained registries of university medical centers, the number and characteristics of patients according to the three selection methods were investigated and their correlation was analyzed. Patients with anterior circulation stroke due to occlusion of the middle cerebral and/or internal carotid artery and a National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score of ≥6 points, who arrived within 8 hours or between 6 and 12 hours of symptom onset and underwent magnetic resonance imaging prior to EVT, were included. Collateral status was assessed using magnetic resonance perfusion-derived collateral flow maps. RESULTS: Three hundred thirty-five patients were investigated; the proportions of patients who were eligible and ineligible for EVT in all three selection methods were both small (n=85, 25.4%; n=54, 16.1%, respectively). The intercorrelation among the three selection methods was low (κ=0.235). The baseline NIHSS score and onset-to-selection time interval were associated with the presence of clinical-core mismatch, while the penumbra/core volume ratio and onset-to-selection time interval were related to target mismatch; none of these variables were associated with collateral status. The infarct core volume was associated with favorable profiles in all three selection methods. CONCLUSIONS: Although the application of individual selection methods resulted in favorable outcomes after EVT in clinical trials, there is a significant discrepancy in EVT eligibility depending on the selection method used.


Subject(s)
Academic Medical Centers , Carotid Artery, Internal , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Methods , Prospective Studies , Registries , Stroke
6.
Journal of Stroke ; : 208-217, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-714419

ABSTRACT

Intracranial large artery disease (ILAD) is the major cause of stroke worldwide. With the application of recently introduced diagnostic techniques, the prevalence of non-atherosclerotic ILAD is expected to increase. Herein, we reviewed recent reports and summarized progress in the diagnosis and clinical impact of differentiation between ILAD of atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic origin. Our review of the literature suggests that more careful consideration of non-atherosclerotic causes and the application of appropriate diagnostic techniques in patients with ILAD may not only provide better results in the treatment of patients, but it may also lead to more successful clinical trials for the treatment of intracranial atherosclerosis.


Subject(s)
Arteries , Atherosclerosis , Constriction, Pathologic , Diagnosis , Humans , Intracranial Arteriosclerosis , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Prevalence , Stroke
7.
Journal of Stroke ; : 77-87, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-121540

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Patients with active cancer are at an increased risk for stroke. Hypercoagulability plays an important role in cancer-related stroke. We aimed to test whether 1) hypercoagulability is a predictor of survival, and 2) correction of the hypercoagulable state leads to better survival in patients with stroke and active cancer. METHODS: We recruited consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke and active systemic cancer between January 2006 and July 2015. Hypercoagulability was assessed using plasma D-dimer levels before and after 7 days of anticoagulation treatment. The study outcomes included overall and 1-year survival. Plasma D-dimer levels before and after treatment were tested in univariate and multivariate Cox regression models. We controlled for systemic metastasis, stroke mechanism, age, stroke severity, primary cancer type, histology, and atrial fibrillation using the forward stepwise method. RESULTS: A total of 268 patients were included in the analysis. Patients with high (3rd–4th quartiles) pre-treatment plasma D-dimer levels showed decreased overall and 1-year survival (adjusted HR, 2.19 [95% CI, 1.46–3.31] and 2.70 [1.68–4.35], respectively). After anticoagulation treatment, post-treatment D-dimer level was significantly reduced and independently associated with poor 1-year survival (adjusted HR, 1.03 [95% CI, 1.01–1.05] per 1 μg/mL increase, P=0.015). The successful correction of hypercoagulability was a protective factor for 1-year survival (adjusted HR 0.26 [CI 0.10–0.68], P=0.006). CONCLUSIONS: Hypercoagulability is associated with poor survival after stroke in patients with active cancer. Effective correction of hypercoagulability may play a protective role for survival in these patients.


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation , Humans , Methods , Mortality , Neoplasm Metastasis , Plasma , Prognosis , Protective Factors , Stroke , Thrombophilia
8.
Journal of Stroke ; : 88-96, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-121539

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Perfusion-diffusion mismatch has been evaluated to determine whether the presence of a target mismatch helps to identify patients who respond favorably to recanalization therapies. We compared the impact on infarct growth of collateral status and the presence of a penumbra, using magnetic resonance perfusion (MRP) techniques. METHODS: Consecutive patients who were candidates for recanalization therapy and underwent serial diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and MRP were enrolled. A collateral flow map derived from MRP source data was generated by automatic post-processing. The impact of a target mismatch (Tmax>6 s/apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) volume≥1.8, ADC volume10 s for ADC volume<100 mL) on infarct growth was compared with MR-based collateral grading on day 7 DWI, using multivariate linear regression analysis. RESULTS: Among 73 patients, 55 (75%) showed a target mismatch, whereas collaterals were poor in 14 (19.2%), intermediate in 36 (49.3%), and good in 23 (31.5%) patients. After adjusting for initial severity of stroke, early recanalization (P<0.001) and the MR-based collateral grading (P=0.001), but not the presence of a target mismatch, were independently associated with infarct growth. Even in patients with a target mismatch and successful recanalization, the degree of infarct growth depended on the collateral status. Perfusion status at later Tmax time points (beyond the arterial phase) was more closely correlated with collateral status. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with good collaterals show a favorable outcome in terms of infarct growth, regardless of the presence of a target mismatch pattern. The presence of slow blood filling predicts collateral status and infarct growth.


Subject(s)
Collateral Circulation , Diffusion , Humans , Linear Models , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Perfusion , Stroke
9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-72142

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The quality of anticoagulation is critical for ensuring the benefit of warfarin, but this has been less well studied in Korean ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). METHODS: This study retrospectively analyzed the data of patients who had an AF-related ischemic stroke and were treated with long-term warfarin therapy in 16 Korean centers. The quality of warfarin therapy was primarily assessed by the time in therapeutic range [TTR; international normalized ratio (INR), 2.0–3.0] and additionally by the proportion of INR values within the therapeutic range. RESULTS: The long-term warfarin-treated cohort comprised 1,230 patients. They were aged 70.1±9.7 years (mean±SD), 42.5% were female, and their CHA₂DS₂-VASc score was 4.75±1.41. The TTR analysis included 33,941 INR measurements for 27,487 months: per patients, 27.6 (SD, 22.4) INR measurements for 22.4 (SD, 12.9) months. The mean TTR of individual patients was 49.1% (95% confidence interval, 47.9–50.3%), and the TTR quartiles were 64.5%. None of the 16 centers achieved a mean TTR of >60%. Of all INR measurements, 44.6% were within the therapeutic range, 41.7% were 3.0. CONCLUSIONS: In Korean ischemic stroke patients who had AF, the quality of warfarin therapy was low and might be inadequate to effectively prevent recurrent stroke or systemic embolism.


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation , Cohort Studies , Embolism , Female , Humans , International Normalized Ratio , Observational Study , Retrospective Studies , Stroke , Warfarin
10.
Journal of Stroke ; : 261-270, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-51274

ABSTRACT

For patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis (ICAS), antithrombotic agents are the mainstay of therapy. Anticoagulation (warfarin) is not widely used since it is not more effective than aspirin and carries a high risk of bleeding. New oral anticoagulants are showing promise, but their use has not been investigated in appropriate clinical trials. Since the recurrent stroke risk is high with aspirin monotherapy, dual antiplatelets are considered in the early stage of symptomatic ICAS. Based on the Clopidogrel in High-Risk Patients with Acute Nondisabling Cerebrovascular Events (CHANCE) and Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) results, aspirin plus clopidogrel has been recommended. However, this combination was not superior to aspirin monotherapy in patients with ICAS in the CHANCE substudy. Progression of ICAS is common, and it is associated with recurrent strokes. In the Trial of Cilostazol in Symptomatic Intracranial Arterial Stenosis (TOSS) study, aspirin plus cilostazol was more effective than aspirin monotherapy in preventing progression. The TOSS II trial showed that the overall change in stenosis was better with aspirin plus cilostazol than with aspirin plus clopidogrel. Aside from antithrombotic therapy, risk factor management is critical for secondary prevention, and high blood pressure is clearly linked to recurrent stroke. However, blood pressure may have to be cautiously managed in the early stage of stroke. Considering that ICAS is the major cause of stroke worldwide, further investigations are needed to establish optimal management strategies for patients with ICAS.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants , Aspirin , Blood Pressure , Constriction, Pathologic , Fibrinolytic Agents , Hemorrhage , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors , Hypertension , Intracranial Arteriosclerosis , Risk Factors , Secondary Prevention , Stents , Stroke
11.
Journal of Stroke ; : 169-178, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-113531

ABSTRACT

After recent randomized control trials (RCTs), non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NAOAs) are now widely being used in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) worldwide. However, current guidelines for the use of NOACs in patients with AF are derived mostly using a Caucasian population and non-stroke patients. Relatively few Asian patients with AF and stroke are included in the recent RCTs. As a result, the optimal use of NOACs in this particular group of patients is remains to be settled. The optimal dose of NOACs and response to current dose of NOACs of Asian patients with AF and stroke may differ from those of westerners and patients without stroke. We reviewed available research on NOACs by searching PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov published in English up to December 2015. In this review, the characteristics of Asian AF patients with prior stroke/transient ischemic attack, which might influence the efficacy and safety profiles of NOACs, are discussed. In addition, we summarize the risk factors for bleeding complications on NOACs, which are related or unrelated with the blood level of NOACs. Lastly, we provide recent data of reduced dose of NOACs from RCTs or large cohorts. The results reviewed herein call for clinical trials to test whether a reduced dose of NOACs is beneficial in Asian patients with AF and stroke. In the meantime, further researches are needed to establish the safety and efficacy of dose-adjusted NOACs considering both blood levels of NOACs and fragility of patients in Asian patients with AF and stroke.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants , Asian Continental Ancestry Group , Atrial Fibrillation , Cohort Studies , Hemorrhage , Humans , Risk Factors , Stroke
12.
Journal of Stroke ; : 179-186, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-113530

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The outcomes of acute internal carotid artery (ICA) terminus occlusions are poor. We classified ICA terminus occlusions into 2 groups according to the occlusion pattern of the circle of Willis and hypothesized that clinical outcomes would significantly differ between them. METHODS: Consecutive patients with acute ICA terminus occlusions evaluated by baseline computed tomographic angiography were enrolled. We investigated the occlusion patterns in the circle of Willis, retrospectively classified patients into simple ICA terminus occlusion (STO; with good Willisian collaterals from neighboring cerebral circulation) and complex ICA terminus occlusion (CTO; with one or more of A2 anterior cerebral artery, fetal posterior cerebral artery occlusion, or hypoplastic/absent contralateral A1; or with poor collaterals from anterior communicating artery) groups, and compared their baseline characteristics and outcomes. RESULTS: The STO group (n=58) showed smaller infarct volumes at 72 hours than the CTO group (n=34) (median, 81 mL [interquartile range, 38-192] vs. 414 mL [193-540], P<0.001) and more favorable outcomes (3-month modified Rankin Scale 0-3, 44.8% vs. 8.8%, P<0.001; 3-month mortality, 24.1% vs. 67.6%, P<0.001). In multivariable analyses, STO remained an independent predictor for favorable outcomes (odds ratio 6.1, P=0.010). CONCLUSIONS: Favorable outcomes in STO group suggested that the outcomes of acute ICA terminus occlusions depend on Willisian collateral status. Documenting the subtypes on computed tomographic angiography would help predict patient outcome.


Subject(s)
Angiography , Anterior Cerebral Artery , Carotid Artery Thrombosis , Carotid Artery, Internal , Cerebral Infarction , Circle of Willis , Collateral Circulation , Endovascular Procedures , Humans , Mortality , Posterior Cerebral Artery , Retrospective Studies
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-42081

ABSTRACT

Both the incidence and prevalence of stroke in Asia are steadily increasing, and the burden of stroke is particularly high in Asian countries. Although strokes in Asians and Caucasians share many common features, there are some differences that are probably due to differences in lifestyle and genetic background. While there have been advances in the stroke classification system, the assignment of Asian stroke patients to etiological categories has received little attention. The current classification system may not be well suited to Asian patients with ischemic stroke because the proportions and relative importance of stroke subtypes may differ with race and ethnicity. This review addresses concerns about the use of the current stroke classification system in Asian patients with ischemic stroke, and proposes a classification system that is more specific to the Asian population, in conjunction with discussing advances in diagnostic techniques.


Subject(s)
Asia , Asian Continental Ancestry Group , Classification , Continental Population Groups , Humans , Incidence , Life Style , Prevalence , Stroke
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-158263

ABSTRACT

Stem cell therapy is considered a potential regenerative strategy for patients with neurologic deficits. Studies involving animal models of ischemic stroke have shown that stem cells transplanted into the brain can lead to functional improvement. With current advances in the understanding regarding the effects of introducing stem cells and their mechanisms of action, several clinical trials of stem cell therapy have been conducted in patients with stroke since 2005, including studies using mesenchymal stem cells, bone marrow mononuclear cells, and neural stem/progenitor cells. In addition, several clinical trials of the use of adult stem cells to treat ischemic stroke are ongoing. This review presents the status of our understanding of adult stem cells and results from clinical trials, and introduces ongoing clinical studies of adult stem cell therapy in the field of stroke.


Subject(s)
Adult Stem Cells , Adult , Bone Marrow , Brain , Humans , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , Models, Animal , Neurologic Manifestations , Stem Cells , Stroke
15.
Journal of Stroke ; : 12-20, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-135899

ABSTRACT

Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a unique cerebrovascular disease characterized by the progressive stenosis of large intracranial arteries and a hazy network of basal collaterals called moyamoya vessels. Because the etiology of MMD is unknown, its diagnosis is based on characteristic angiographic findings. Re-vascularization techniques (e.g., bypass surgery) are used to restore perfusion, and are the primary treatment for MMD. There is no specific treatment to prevent MMD progression. This review summarizes the recent advances in MMD pathophysiology, including the genetic and circulating factors related to disease development. Genetic and environmental factors may play important roles in the development of the vascular stenosis and aberrant angiogenesis in complex ways. These factors include the related changes in circulating endothelial/smooth muscle progenitor cells, cytokines related to vascular remodeling and angiogenesis, and endothelium, such as caveolin which is a plasma membrane protein. With a better understanding of MMD pathophysiology, nonsurgical approaches targeting MMD pathogenesis may be available to stop or slow the progression of this disease. The possible strategies include targeting growth factors, retinoic acid, caveolin-1, and stem cells.


Subject(s)
Arteries , Caveolin 1 , Cell Membrane , Constriction, Pathologic , Cytokines , Diagnosis , Endothelium , Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins , Moyamoya Disease , Perfusion , Stem Cells , Tretinoin
16.
Journal of Stroke ; : 12-20, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-135894

ABSTRACT

Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a unique cerebrovascular disease characterized by the progressive stenosis of large intracranial arteries and a hazy network of basal collaterals called moyamoya vessels. Because the etiology of MMD is unknown, its diagnosis is based on characteristic angiographic findings. Re-vascularization techniques (e.g., bypass surgery) are used to restore perfusion, and are the primary treatment for MMD. There is no specific treatment to prevent MMD progression. This review summarizes the recent advances in MMD pathophysiology, including the genetic and circulating factors related to disease development. Genetic and environmental factors may play important roles in the development of the vascular stenosis and aberrant angiogenesis in complex ways. These factors include the related changes in circulating endothelial/smooth muscle progenitor cells, cytokines related to vascular remodeling and angiogenesis, and endothelium, such as caveolin which is a plasma membrane protein. With a better understanding of MMD pathophysiology, nonsurgical approaches targeting MMD pathogenesis may be available to stop or slow the progression of this disease. The possible strategies include targeting growth factors, retinoic acid, caveolin-1, and stem cells.


Subject(s)
Arteries , Caveolin 1 , Cell Membrane , Constriction, Pathologic , Cytokines , Diagnosis , Endothelium , Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins , Moyamoya Disease , Perfusion , Stem Cells , Tretinoin
17.
Journal of Stroke ; : 256-266, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-193778

ABSTRACT

Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and physical disability among adults. It has been 15 years since clinical trials of stem cell therapy in patients with stroke have been conducted using adult stem cells like mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells. Results of randomized controlled trials showed that adult stem cell therapy was safe but its efficacy was modest, underscoring the need for new stem cell therapy strategies. The primary limitations of current stem cell therapies include (a) the limited source of engraftable stem cells, (b) the presence of optimal time window for stem cell therapies, (c) inherited limitation of stem cells in terms of growth, trophic support, and differentiation potential, and (d) possible transplanted cell-mediated adverse effects, such as tumor formation. Here, we discuss recent advances that overcome these hurdles in adult stem cell therapy for stroke.


Subject(s)
Adult Stem Cells , Adult , Biocompatible Materials , Bone Marrow , Cause of Death , Humans , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , Stem Cells , Stroke
18.
Journal of Stroke ; : 304-311, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-193773

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Left atrial dysfunction has been reported in patients with patent foramen ovale (PFO). Here we investigated the role of left atrial dysfunction in the development of embolic stroke in patients with PFO. METHODS: We identified consecutive patients with embolic stroke of undetermined sources except for PFO (PFO+ESUS). Healthy subjects with PFO served as controls (PFO+control). A stratified analysis by 10-year age group and an age- and sex- matching analysis were performed to compare echocardiographic markers between groups. In the PFO+ESUS group, infarct patterns of PFO-related stroke were determined (cortical vs. cortico-subcortical) and analyzed in correlation with left atrial function parameters. RESULTS: A total of 118 patients and 231 controls were included. The left atrial volume indices (LAVIs) of the PFO+ESUS patients were higher than those of the PFO+controls in age groups of 40–49, 50–59, and 60–69 years (P28 mL/m2) LAVI was more associated with the cortical infarct pattern (P=0.043 for an acute infarction and P=0.024 for a chronic infarction, both adjusted for age and shunt amount). The degree of right-to-left shunting was not associated with infarct patterns, but with the posterior location of acute infarcts (P=0.028). CONCLUSIONS: Left atrial enlargement was associated with embolic stroke in subjects with PFO. Left atrial physiology might contribute to the development of PFO-related stroke and need to be taken into consideration for optimal prevention of PFO-related stroke.


Subject(s)
Atrial Function, Left , Echocardiography , Embolism , Embolism, Paradoxical , Foramen Ovale, Patent , Healthy Volunteers , Heart Atria , Humans , Infarction , Physiology , Stroke
19.
Experimental Neurobiology ; : 130-138, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-213644

ABSTRACT

Ischemia can cause decreased cerebral neurovascular coupling, leading to a failure in the autoregulation of cerebral blood flow. This study aims to investigate the effect of varying degrees of ischemia on cerebral hemodynamic reactivity using in vivo real-time optical imaging. We utilized direct cortical stimulation to elicit hyper-excitable neuronal activation, which leads to induced hemodynamic changes in both the normal and middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) ischemic stroke groups. Hemodynamic measurements from optical imaging accurately predict the severity of occlusion in mild and severe MCAO animals. There is neither an increase in cerebral blood volume nor in vessel reactivity in the ipsilateral hemisphere (I.H) of animals with severe MCAO. The pial artery in the contralateral hemisphere (C.H) of the severe MCAO group reacted more slowly than both hemispheres in the normal and mild MCAO groups. In addition, the arterial reactivity of the I.H in the mild MCAO animals was faster than the normal animals. Furthermore, artery reactivity is tightly correlated with histological and behavioral results in the MCAO ischemic group. Thus, in vivo optical imaging may offer a simple and useful tool to assess the degree of ischemia and to understand how cerebral hemodynamics and vascular reactivity are affected by ischemia.


Subject(s)
Animals , Arteries , Blood Volume , Cerebrovascular Circulation , Hemodynamics , Homeostasis , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery , Ischemia , Middle Cerebral Artery , Neurons , Neurovascular Coupling , Optical Imaging , Rodentia , Stroke
20.
Journal of Stroke ; : 192-198, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-24742

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Advantages of new oral anticoagulations may be greater in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients of poor anticoagulation control with warfarin. The SAMe-TT2R2 scoring system, based on clinical variables, was recently developed to aid in identifying these patients. In this study, we investigated the association of this clinical composite score with genetic factors related warfarin dosing and the quality of anticoagulation control. METHODS: Clinical and genetic data were collected from 380 consecutive Korean patients with AF (CHA2DS2-VASc score, 3.5+/-1.8) who were followed for an average of 4 years. We evaluated factors associated with time in therapeutic range (TTR, INR 2-3), including the CYP2C9 and VKORC1 genotypes and the SAMe-TT2R2 score (Sex female, Age two co-morbidities], Treatment [interacting drugs, e.g., amiodarone], Tobacco use within 2 years [doubled], and Race non-white [doubled]). RESULTS: The average SAMe-TT2R2 score was 3.4+/-0.9, range 2-7; and 153 patients (40.2%) had SAMe-TT2R2 scores > or =4. Time in specific INR ranges varied depending on the VKORC1 genotype but not with the CYP2C9 genotype or the SAMe-TT2R2 score. TTR was higher in patients with the VKORC1 1173C>T than in VKORC1 TT (61.7+/-16% vs. 56.7+/-17.4%, P=0.031). Multivariate testing showed that VKORC1 genotype but not the SAMe-TT2R2 score was significantly associated with labile INRs. There was no correlation between the SAMe-TT2R2 scores and pharmacogenetic data. CONCLUSIONS: A genetic factor, but none of the common clinical and demographic factors, as combined in the SAMe-TT2R2 score, was associated with the quality of anticoagulation control in Korean patients with AF.


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation , Continental Population Groups , Demography , Female , Genotype , Humans , International Normalized Ratio , Tobacco Use , Warfarin
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