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1.
J Genet ; 2019 May; 98: 1-10
Article | IMSEAR | ID: sea-215456

ABSTRACT

Yak (Bos grunniens) is a unique bovine species and considered as lifeline of highlanders. The male subfertility in yak is a matter of concern that causes huge economic loses. The spermatogenesis and male reproduction machinery are critically governed by Y-linked genes which tend to acquire necessary information in the course of evolution. The Y-linked fertility genes are present in multiple copies with testis-limited expression. To understand this novel complexity, 12 male-specific region of Y chromosome (MSY) genes have been studied in the yak. Targeted genes are amplified in male and female genomic DNA and confirmed the male derived specificity. Moreover, testis and sperm-specific expressions of MSY genes are distinct among different tissues. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction results validate the expression pattern of these genes in various tissues with predominant expression intestis and sperm. The sequencing of resultant yak MSY genes gives significant result and shows similarity with cattle (Bos indicus), but few nucleotide mismatches define the proposition of infertile male in the F1 hybrid of cattle and yak. The identified MSY genes can be used to establish male-specific characteristics and to differentiate male and female yak genotypically. Further, these genes may act as valuable resources to understand the capacity of spermatogenesis, embryogenesis, cellular growth, azoospermia and malesubfertility in the yak.

2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-820232

ABSTRACT

Melioidosis is a severe and fatal infectious disease in the tropics and subtropics. It presents as a febrile illness with protean manifestation ranging from chronic localized infection to acute fulminant septicemia with dissemination of infection to multiple organs characterized by abscesses. Pneumonia is the most common clinical presentation. Because of the wide range of clinical presentations, physicians may often misdiagnose and mistreat the disease for tuberculosis, pneumonia or other pyogenic infections. The purpose of this paper is to present common pitfalls in diagnosis and provide optimal approaches to enable early diagnosis and prompt treatment of melioidosis. Melioidosis may occur beyond the boundaries of endemic areas. There is no pathognomonic feature specific to a diagnosis of melioidosis. In endemic areas, physicians need to expand the diagnostic work-up to include melioidosis when confronted with clinical scenarios of pyrexia of unknown origin, progressive pneumonia or sepsis. Radiological imaging is an integral part of the diagnostic workup. Knowledge of the modes of transmission and risk factors will add support in clinically suspected cases to initiate therapy. In situations of clinically highly probable or possible cases where laboratory bacteriological confirmation is not possible, applying evidence-based criteria and empirical treatment with antimicrobials is recommended. It is of prime importance that patients undergo the full course of antimicrobial therapy to avoid relapse and recurrence. Early diagnosis and appropriate management is crucial in reducing serious complications leading to high mortality, and in preventing recurrences of the disease. Thus, there is a crucial need for promoting awareness among physicians at all levels and for improved diagnostic microbiology services. Further, the need for making the disease notifiable and/or initiating melioidosis registries in endemic countries appears to be compelling.

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