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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-900428

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Most patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) report food-related aggravation of symptoms. Wheat/gluten is one of the most commonly incriminated. We studied the prevalence of self-reported wheat sensitivity in patients with IBS and in a healthy population from a region in India consuming mixed-cereal diets, correlated it with serological and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) markers of celiac disease, and evaluated the response to a wheat-free diet. @*Methods@#We surveyed 204 patients with IBS and 400 healthy persons for self-reported wheat sensitivity. Testing for IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase and HLA DQ2 or DQ8 was done in individuals who reported wheat sensitivity. Consenting persons with wheat sensitivity were put on wheat-free diet and monitored for symptom change. @*Results@#Twenty-three of 204 patients with IBS (11.3%) and none of the healthy subjects self-reported wheat sensitivity. Of 23 patients, 14 (60.9%) were positive for HLA DQ2 or DQ8 and none for anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody. After 6 weeks on wheat-free diet, all 19 participating patients reported clinical improvement; fewer patients had bloating, diarrhea, constipation, and easy fatigue. @*Conclusions@#Eleven percent of patients with IBS self-reported wheat sensitivity. None of them had positive celiac serology; 60.9% were positive for HLA DQ2 and DQ8, suggesting a possible genetic basis. All of them improved symptomatically on a wheat-free diet.

2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-892724

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Most patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) report food-related aggravation of symptoms. Wheat/gluten is one of the most commonly incriminated. We studied the prevalence of self-reported wheat sensitivity in patients with IBS and in a healthy population from a region in India consuming mixed-cereal diets, correlated it with serological and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) markers of celiac disease, and evaluated the response to a wheat-free diet. @*Methods@#We surveyed 204 patients with IBS and 400 healthy persons for self-reported wheat sensitivity. Testing for IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase and HLA DQ2 or DQ8 was done in individuals who reported wheat sensitivity. Consenting persons with wheat sensitivity were put on wheat-free diet and monitored for symptom change. @*Results@#Twenty-three of 204 patients with IBS (11.3%) and none of the healthy subjects self-reported wheat sensitivity. Of 23 patients, 14 (60.9%) were positive for HLA DQ2 or DQ8 and none for anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody. After 6 weeks on wheat-free diet, all 19 participating patients reported clinical improvement; fewer patients had bloating, diarrhea, constipation, and easy fatigue. @*Conclusions@#Eleven percent of patients with IBS self-reported wheat sensitivity. None of them had positive celiac serology; 60.9% were positive for HLA DQ2 and DQ8, suggesting a possible genetic basis. All of them improved symptomatically on a wheat-free diet.

3.
Intestinal Research ; : 355-378, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-834427

ABSTRACT

Despite several recent advances in therapy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) therapy has retained its place especially in ulcerative colitis. This consensus on 5-ASA is obtained through a modified Delphi process, and includes guiding statements and recommendations based on literature evidence (randomized trials, and observational studies), clinical practice, and expert opinion on use of 5-ASA in IBD by Indian gastroenterologists. The aim is to aid practitioners in selecting appropriate treatment strategies and facilitate optimal use of 5-ASA in patients with IBD.

4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-765958

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: There has been major progress in our understanding of the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and novel treatment classes have emerged. The Rome IV guidelines were published in 2016 and together with the growing body of Asian data on IBS, we felt it is timely to update the Asian IBS Consensus. METHODS: Key opinion leaders from Asian countries were organized into 4 teams to review 4 themes: symptoms and epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and investigations, and lifestyle modifications and treatments. The consensus development process was carried out by using a modified Delphi method. RESULTS: Thirty-seven statements were developed. Asian data substantiate the current global viewpoint that IBS is a disorder of gut-brain interaction. Socio-cultural and environmental factors in Asia appear to influence the greater overlap between IBS and upper gastrointestinal symptoms. New classes of treatments comprising low fermentable oligo-, di-, monosacharides, and polyols diet, probiotics, non-absorbable antibiotics, and secretagogues have good evidence base for their efficacy. CONCLUSIONS: Our consensus is that all patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders should be evaluated comprehensively with a view to holistic management. Physicians should be encouraged to take a positive attitude to the treatment outcomes for IBS patients.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents , Asia , Asian Continental Ancestry Group , Consensus , Constipation , Diagnosis , Diarrhea , Diet , Epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Diseases , Humans , Intestines , Irritable Bowel Syndrome , Life Style , Methods , Probiotics
6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-46115

ABSTRACT

Chronic constipation (CC) may impact on quality of life. There is substantial patient dissatisfaction; possible reasons are failure to recognize underlying constipation, inappropriate dietary advice and inadequate treatment. The aim of these practical guidelines intended for primary care physicians, and which are based on Asian perspectives, is to provide an approach to CC that is relevant to the existing health-care infrastructure. Physicians should not rely on infrequent bowel movements to diagnose CC as many patients have one or more bowel movement a day. More commonly, patients present with hard stool, straining, incomplete feeling, bloating and other dyspeptic symptoms. Physicians should consider CC in these situations and when patients are found to use laxative containing supplements. In the absence of alarm features physicians may start with a 2-4 week therapeutic trial of available pharmacological agents including osmotic, stimulant and enterokinetic agents. Where safe to do so, physicians should consider regular (as opposed to on demand dosing), combination treatment and continuous treatment for at least 4 weeks. If patients do not achieve satisfactory response, they should be referred to tertiary centers for physiological evaluation of colonic transit and pelvic floor function. Surgical referral is a last resort, which should be considered only after a thorough physiological and psychological evaluation.


Subject(s)
Asia , Asian Continental Ancestry Group , Colon , Constipation , Health Resorts , Humans , Pelvic Floor , Physicians, Primary Care , Primary Health Care , Quality of Life , Referral and Consultation , Sprains and Strains
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