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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-874684

ABSTRACT

Background@#and Purpose Mutations in the ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 1 gene (GDAP1) are known to cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). These mutations are very rare in most countries, but not in certain Mediterranean countries. The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical and neuroimaging characteristics of Korean CMT patients with GDAP1 mutations. @*Methods@#Gene sequencing was applied to 1,143 families in whom CMT had been diagnosed from 2005 to 2020. PMP22 duplication was found in 344 families, and whole-exome sequencing was performed in 699 patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were obtained using either a 1.5-T or 3.0-T MRI system. @*Results@#We found ten patients from eight families with GDAP1 mutations: five with autosomal dominant (AD) CMT type 2K (three families with p.R120W and two families with p.Q218E) and three with autosomal recessive (AR) intermediate CMT type A (two families with homozygous p.H256R and one family with p.P111H and p.V219G mutations). The frequency was about 1.0% exclusive of the PMP22 duplication, which is similar to that in other Asian countries. There were clinical differences among AD GDAP1 patients according to mutation sites. Surprisingly, fat infiltrations evident in lower-limb MRI differed between AD and AR patients. The posterior-compartment muscles in the calf were affected early and predominantly in AD patients, whereas AR patients showed fat infiltration predominantly in the anterolateral-compartment muscles. @*Conclusions@#This is the first cohort report on Korean patients with GDAP1 mutations. The patients with AD and AR inheritance routes exhibited different clinical and neuroimaging features in the lower extremities. We believe that these results will help to expand the knowledge of the clinical, genetic, and neuroimaging features of CMT.

2.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-900907

ABSTRACT

Background@#Pain is one of the most common chief complaints in neurological field. Authors try to inform the current situation of pain medicine in neurological practice and present an effective method for pain-related education during neurology residency and for practicing neurologists. @*Methods@#A survey was conducted from November 16 to November 27, 2020 for members of the Korean Neurological Association, and the results were analyzed. @*Results@#About two-thirds of neurologists replied that more than 25% of their patients were suffered from diverse pain including headache, spine pain or neuropathic pain. Despite many patients are visiting to neurologist for pain treatment, most neurologists are aware that they have not received sufficient practical pain education in the past and present. Therefore, they want more educational opportunities in pain medicine including interventional pain management and physical and pharmacologic therapies for more effective treatment. @*Conclusions@#More follow-up studies on pain treatment and education should be conducted. It is also essential that the members of the society continue to interest and participate in the change of the pain education program.

3.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-893203

ABSTRACT

Background@#Pain is one of the most common chief complaints in neurological field. Authors try to inform the current situation of pain medicine in neurological practice and present an effective method for pain-related education during neurology residency and for practicing neurologists. @*Methods@#A survey was conducted from November 16 to November 27, 2020 for members of the Korean Neurological Association, and the results were analyzed. @*Results@#About two-thirds of neurologists replied that more than 25% of their patients were suffered from diverse pain including headache, spine pain or neuropathic pain. Despite many patients are visiting to neurologist for pain treatment, most neurologists are aware that they have not received sufficient practical pain education in the past and present. Therefore, they want more educational opportunities in pain medicine including interventional pain management and physical and pharmacologic therapies for more effective treatment. @*Conclusions@#More follow-up studies on pain treatment and education should be conducted. It is also essential that the members of the society continue to interest and participate in the change of the pain education program.

4.
Clinical Pain ; (2): 116-119, 2020.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-897840

ABSTRACT

Cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) is commonly performed to provide relief of pain caused by radiculopathy. Intra-arterial injection of particulate steroid or direct needle injury can lead to spinal artery embolism or thrombosis.Also there is a possibility of vascular spasm. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of spinal cord infarction that occurred after TFESI with non-particulate steroid in Korea. A 47-year-old female patient underwent C7 TFESI at local pain clinic. Injected materials were dexamethasone and mepivacaine. Right after the intervention, she felt muscle weakness and decreased sensation. On physical examination, she had decreased sensation from C4 to T2 dermatome in light touch and pin-prick test. Proprioception and vibration were intact. The motor grades of upper extremities were grade 1. Cervical and thoracic spine MRI was checked. Diffusion-weighted image and apparent diffusion coefficient image showed long extension of spinal cord infarction from C2 to T1 level.

5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-837272

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The purpose of this study was to measure and compare the strain value exerted on the cervical area using different screw tightening protocols in implant-supported, screw-retained 3-unit prostheses. @*Materials and methods@#Strain gauges were attached to four implants: two external and two internal. Thereafter, two study model were designed each type using acrylic resin. CAD-CAM was used to design hex and nonhex abutments for each group (EH, ENH, IH, and INH group) and Screw-cement-retained prostheses were also designed using a nonprecious base metal. Abutment was fixed with 10 Ncm torque, and the prosthesis was cemented. Screws were fixed with 30 Ncm torque using different three protocols. After 5 min, the strain gauge level was measured, and group analysis was performed (α=.05). @*Results@#External group showed significantly lower strain values than internal group and the EH group showed significantly lower strain values than the ENH group (P.05). The IH group exhibited significantly higher strain values than the INH group and the IH group showed a significant difference in strain values based on the types of screw tightening protocols used (P<.05). @*Conclusion@#There was no significant effect on the external type in the implant-supported, screw-retained prostheses. However, strain values were high in the internal type, and the types of screw tightening protocol significantly affected these implants.

6.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-834811

ABSTRACT

Experts have communicated and developed field of study through scientific terminology. However, medical terminologies are no longer used only by experts. As technology advances and society becomes more complex, the public encounter medical terminology more often. Therefore, medical experts need to revise the medical terms in simple and easy way to facilitate communication with the public. Korean Neurological Association has been make an efforts to manage the Korean terminologies in field of neurology. In this paper, we summarized principles of the use in Korean neurological terminologies, and frequently misused terms.

7.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-830521

ABSTRACT

Objective@#To evaluate the effects of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) on improving lymphedema, quality of life, and fibrous tissue in patients with stage 2 lymphedema. @*Methods@#Breast cancer-related lymphedema patients referred to the rehabilitation center were recruited. We enrolled stage 2 lymphedema patients who had firmness of the skin at their forearm, a circumference difference of more than 2 cm between each arm, or a volume difference between upper extremities greater than 200 mL, confirmed by lymphoscintigraphy. The patients were randomly divided into the ESWT group and the control group. ESWT was performed for 3 weeks (two sessions per week); both groups received complex decongestive physical therapy. All patients were evaluated at baseline and at 3 weeks after treatment. The measurements performed included visual analog scale score, volume, circumference, QuickDASH (Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand) score, bioelectrical impedance, and skin thickness. @*Results@#The patients in both groups (n=15 in each group) completed the 3-week therapy experiment. No significant differences were observed in demographic characteristics between groups. After the 3-week treatment period, improvement was noted in the circumference difference below the elbow, volume, ratio of extracellular water to total body water, and skin thickness in the ESWT group. A significant difference was found in all the above-mentioned areas except in circumference below the elbow in the ESWT group. @*Conclusion@#ESWT reduced edema and skin fibrosis without significant complications. Therefore, ESWT can be used together with complex decongestive physical therapy for treating lymphedema.

8.
Clinical Pain ; (2): 116-119, 2020.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-890136

ABSTRACT

Cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) is commonly performed to provide relief of pain caused by radiculopathy. Intra-arterial injection of particulate steroid or direct needle injury can lead to spinal artery embolism or thrombosis.Also there is a possibility of vascular spasm. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of spinal cord infarction that occurred after TFESI with non-particulate steroid in Korea. A 47-year-old female patient underwent C7 TFESI at local pain clinic. Injected materials were dexamethasone and mepivacaine. Right after the intervention, she felt muscle weakness and decreased sensation. On physical examination, she had decreased sensation from C4 to T2 dermatome in light touch and pin-prick test. Proprioception and vibration were intact. The motor grades of upper extremities were grade 1. Cervical and thoracic spine MRI was checked. Diffusion-weighted image and apparent diffusion coefficient image showed long extension of spinal cord infarction from C2 to T1 level.

9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-739822

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of combination functional electrical stimulation (FES) and standing frame training on standing balance in stroke patients. METHODS: Patients who had hemiparesis and postural instability after stroke were randomly assigned to one of the two groups; study group underwent FES on the quadriceps and tibialis anterior muscle simultaneously with standing balance training. The control group received standing frame training and FES separately. Both the groups received their respective therapies for 3 weeks. Stability index in Biodex Balance master system, Berg Balance Scale (BBS), manual muscle test, the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index, and Korean version of Mini-Mental State Examination were used to evaluate the effects of the treatment. RESULTS: In total, 30 patients were recruited to the study group and 30 to the control group. Three weeks after treatment, both the groups showed improvement in postural stability scores and physical and cognitive functions. When changes in postural stability were compared between the groups, the study group showed more significant improvement than the control group with regards to the scores of BBS and the stability indices. CONCLUSION: In this study, we found the therapeutic effectiveness of combined therapy of FES and standing frame in subacute stroke patients. The presented protocol is proposed as time-saving and can be applied easily in the clinical setting. Thus, the proposed combined therapy could be a useful method for improving standing balance in subacute stroke patients.


Subject(s)
Cognition , Electric Stimulation , Humans , Methods , Paresis , Rehabilitation , Stroke
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-762669

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of decreased Skeletal Muscle Index (SMI) and hand grip strength on functional recovery in subacute ambulatory stroke patients. METHODS: Subacute stroke patients who were referred to the rehabilitation center were recruited. Decreased SMI and hand grip strength were diagnosed according to the Asian Working Group on Sarcopenia. Diagnostic criteria were decreased SMI and decreased unaffected hand grip strength. SMI was measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Unaffected hand grip strength was measured with a hand dynamometer. Patients were divided into two groups, decreased group (DG) and not-decreased group (NDG), according to the presence of decreased SMI and hand grip strength. Both groups received conventional stroke rehabilitation for 3 weeks. All patients were evaluated at the baseline and at 3 weeks after treatment. Functional status was evaluated with 4-meter walk test (4MWT), 6-minute walk test (6MWT), Timed Up and Go test (TUG), and Modified Barthel Index (MBI). RESULTS: Both groups showed improvement in 4MWT, TUG, and MBI. NDG showed improvement in 6MWT. Comparing improvements between the two groups, NDG showed more improvement in 6MWT and TUG than DG. CONCLUSION: The presence of decreased SMI and hand grip strength had negative effects on functional recovery in subacute ambulatory stroke patients.


Subject(s)
Asians , Electric Impedance , Hand Strength , Hand , Humans , Muscle, Skeletal , Rehabilitation , Rehabilitation Centers , Sarcopenia , Stroke
11.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-716289

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of hand training using low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) within the aftereffect period on hand function in patients with subacute stroke. METHODS: The subacute stroke patients with hand weaknesses were divided randomly into two groups. Patients in the intervention group underwent hand training within the aftereffect period, that is, immediately after receiving low-frequency rTMS treatment. Patients in the control group underwent hand training 2 hours after the low-frequency rTMS treatment. A manual function test (MFT) for ‘grasp and pinch’ and ‘hand activities’; a manual muscle test (MMT) for ‘grasp’, ‘release’, and ‘abductor pollicis brevis (APB)’; and the Modified Ashworth Scale for finger flexion were performed and measured before and immediately after combined therapy as well as 2 weeks after combined therapy. RESULTS: Thirty-two patients with hand weakness were enrolled in this study. The intervention group patients showed more improvements in grasp MMT and MMT APB tested immediately after combined therapy. However, the changes in all measurements were not significantly different between the two groups 2 weeks after the combined therapy. In both groups, hand functions improved significantly immediately after combined therapy and 2 weeks after combined therapy. CONCLUSION: Hand training immediately after low-frequency rTMS showed more rapid improvement in the motor power of hands than hand training conducted 2 hours after low-frequency rTMS. Our results suggest that conducting hand training immediately after low-frequency rTMS could be an improved useful therapeutic option in subacute stroke patients.


Subject(s)
Fingers , Hand Strength , Hand , Humans , Stroke , Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-713938

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of caregiver driven robot-assisted in-ward training in subacute stroke patients. METHODS: A retrospective evaluation was performed for patients treated with caregiver driven robot-assisted in-ward training to retain gait function from June 2014 and December 2016. All patients received more than 2 weeks of caregiver driven robot-assisted in-ward training after undergoing conventional programs. The robot was used as a sitting device, a standing frame, or a high-walker depending on functional status of the patient. Patients were evaluated before and after robot training. Patient records were assessed by Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI), Functional Independence Measure (FIM), and Functional Ambulation Category (FAC). RESULTS: Initially, patients used the robot as a sitting device (n=6), a standing frame (n=7), or a partial body-weight support high-walker (n=2). As patient functions were improved, usage level of the robot was changed to the next level. At the end of the treatment, the robot was used as a sitting device (n=1), a standing frame (n=6), or high-walker (n=8). Scores of K-MBI (Δ17.47±10.72) and FIM (Δ19.80±12.34) were improved in all patients. CONCLUSION: Patients' usage level of the robot and functional scores were improved. Therefore, performing additional caregiver driven robot-assisted in-ward training is feasible and beneficial for subacute stroke patients.


Subject(s)
Caregivers , Gait , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Stroke , Walking
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-719199

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of upper limb rehabilitation combining robot with low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on unilateral spatial neglect in stroke patients. METHODS: Patients who had hemispatial neglect after right hemisphere stroke were randomly divided into rTMS only group, robot only group, and combined group. All groups received conventional neglect therapy and additional treatment for each group. rTMS group received rTMS therapy. Robot group received robot therapy, while combined group received both therapies. The effect of therapy was assessed with Motor-Free Visual Perception Test-3 (MVPT-3), line bisection test, star cancellation test, Catherine Bergego Scale (CBS), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI). These measurements were evaluated before and after treatment. RESULTS: For each group, 10 patients were recruited. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics or initial values among the three groups. Two weeks after the therapy, all groups showed significant improvement in MVPT-3, line bisection test, star cancellation test, CBS, MMSE, and K-MBI. However, changes in measurements showed no significant differences among groups. CONCLUSION: Treatment effect of the combined therapy of robotic therapy and low-frequency rTMS therapy for hemispatial neglect was not statistically different from that of each single treatment. RESULTS: of this study did not prove the superiority of any of the three treatments. Further study with large number of patients is needed to evaluate the superiority of these treatments.


Subject(s)
Humans , Perceptual Disorders , Rehabilitation , Robotics , Stroke , Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation , Upper Extremity , Visual Perception
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-52033

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of combining robot-assisted game training with conventional upper extremity rehabilitation training (RCT) on motor and daily functions in comparison with conventional upper extremity rehabilitation training (OCT) in stroke patients. METHODS: Subjects were eligible if they were able to perform the robot-assisted game training and were divided randomly into a RCT and an OCT group. The RCT group performed one daily session of 30 minutes of robot-assisted game training with a rehabilitation robot, plus one daily session of 30 minutes of conventional rehabilitation training, 5 days a week for 2 weeks. The OCT group performed two daily sessions of 30 minutes of conventional rehabilitation training. The effects of training were measured by a Manual Function Test (MFT), Manual Muscle Test (MMT), Korean version of the Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI) and a questionnaire about satisfaction with training. These measurements were taken before and after the 2-week training. RESULTS: Both groups contained 25 subjects. After training, both groups showed significant improvements in motor and daily functions measured by MFT, MMT, and K-MBI compared to the baseline. Both groups demonstrated similar training effects, except motor power of wrist flexion. Patients in the RCT group were more satisfied than those in the OCT group. CONCLUSION: There were no significant differences in changes in most of the motor and daily functions between the two types of training. However, patients in the RCT group were more satisfied than those in the OCT group. Therefore, RCT could be a useful upper extremity rehabilitation training method.


Subject(s)
Humans , Methods , Rehabilitation , Robotics , Stroke , Upper Extremity , Video Games , Wrist
15.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-761245

ABSTRACT

Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is a common feature of sympathetic autonomic dysfunction and can lead to lightheadedness, weakness, dizziness, and syncope. It is defined as decrease in systolic blood pressure of at least 20 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure of at least 10 mm Hg within 3 minutes of standing. OH is associated with an increased incidence of cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarction, and mortality. Non-pharmacological treatments may alleviate OH-related symptoms; however, are not sufficient when used alone. Pharmacological treatment is essential in managing OH. In this review, we aimed to discuss non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment options for OH.


Subject(s)
Blood Pressure , Cerebrovascular Disorders , Dizziness , Hypertension , Hypotension , Hypotension, Orthostatic , Incidence , Mortality , Myocardial Infarction , Supine Position , Syncope
16.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-217429

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the correlation between the functional dysphagia scale and aspiration pneumonia and which characteristics influence the occurrence of aspiration pneumonia in patients with idiopathic Parkinson disease. METHODS: Fifty-three patients with idiopathic Parkinson disease were prospectively evaluated in this study. Disease severity and functional status were measured by modified Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) staging, Schwab and England activities of daily living (S-E ADL) scale and Korean version of Mini-Mental State Examination (K-MMSE). Swallowing function was evaluated by the functional dysphagia scale (FDS) and the penetration-aspiration scale (PAS) based on a videofluoroscopic swallowing study. The patients were followed up for 3 months and divided into two groups according to the occurrence of aspiration pneumonia. The correlation between the variables and aspiration pneumonia was analyzed. RESULTS: Eight patients of the 53 patients were allocated to the aspiration pneumonia group and 45 patients to the non-aspiration pneumonia group. The patients in the aspiration pneumonia group had significantly higher H&Y staging, and scored lower on S-E ADL scale and K-MMSE. The patients in the aspiration pneumonia group had significantly higher scores on FDS and PAS. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the S-E ADL scale and the FDS were associated with the occurrence of aspiration pneumonia in the patients with Parkinson disease. CONCLUSION: Given that the FDS can quantitatively assess the functional problems associated with dysphagia, it can be clinically effective in predicting the occurrence of aspiration pneumonia, and the FDS and the S-E ADL scale could be predictive variables for aspiration pneumonia in patients with Parkinson disease.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living , Deglutition , Deglutition Disorders , England , Fluoroscopy , Humans , Logistic Models , Parkinson Disease , Pneumonia , Pneumonia, Aspiration , Prospective Studies
17.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-89521

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of a stretching and strengthening exercise program using an upper extremity robot, as compared with a conventional occupational therapy program for upper extremity spasticity in stroke patients. METHODS: Subjects were randomly divided into a robot-assisted therapy (RT) group and a conventional rehabilitation therapy (CT) group. RT group patients received RT and CT once daily for 30 minutes each, 5 days a week, for 2 weeks. RT was performed using an upper-extremity robot (Neuro-X; Apsun Inc., Seoul, Korea), and CT was administered by occupational therapists. CT group patients received CT alone twice daily for 30 minutes, 5 days a week, for 2 weeks. Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) was used to measure the spasticity of upper extremity. Manual muscle tests (MMT), Manual Function Tests (MFT), Brunnstrom stage, and the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI) were used to measure the strength and function of upper extremity. All measurements were obtained before and after 2-week treatment. RESULTS: The RT and CT groups included 22 subjects each. After treatment, both groups showed significantly lower MAS scores and significant improvement in the MMT, MFT, Brunnstrom stage, and K-MBI scores. Treatment effects showed no significant differences between the two groups. CONCLUSION: RT showed similar treatment benefits on spasticity, as compared to CT. The study results suggested that RT could be a useful method for continuous, repeatable, and relatively accurate range of motion exercise in stroke patients with spasticity.


Subject(s)
Humans , Methods , Muscle Spasticity , Occupational Therapy , Range of Motion, Articular , Rehabilitation , Seoul , Stroke , Upper Extremity
18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-48632

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effectiveness of an upper limb rehabilitation robot therapy on hemispatial neglect in stroke patients. METHODS: Patients were randomly divided into an upper limb rehabilitation robot treatment group (robot group) and a control group. The patients in the robot group received left upper limb training using an upper limb rehabilitation robot. The patients sat on the right side of the robot, so that the monitor of the robot was located on the patients' left side. In this position, patients could focus continuously on the left side. The control group received conventional neglect treatment, such as visual scanning training and range of motion exercises, administered by occupational therapists. Both groups received their respective therapies for 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week for 3 weeks. Several tests were used to evaluate treatment effects before and after the 3-week treatment. RESULTS: In total, 38 patients (20 in the robot group and 18 in the control group) completed the study. After completion of the treatment sessions, both groups showed significant improvements in the Motor-Free Visual Perception Test 3rd edition (MVPT-3), the line bisection test, the star cancellation test, the Albert's test, the Catherine Bergego scale, the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index. The changes in all measurements showed no significant differences between the two groups. CONCLUSION: This present study showed that the upper limb robot treatment had benefits for hemispatial neglect in stroke patients that were similar to conventional neglect treatment. The upper limb robot treatment could be a therapeutic option in the treatment of hemispatial neglect after stroke.


Subject(s)
Exercise , Humans , Perceptual Disorders , Range of Motion, Articular , Rehabilitation , Robotics , Stroke , Upper Extremity , Visual Perception
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-759164

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To compare the incidence of overhang between two distinct femoral components and whether there is clinical and radiological benefit of gender-specific implants in short-term follow-up. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and four knees in consecutive 66 female patients who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty due to primary osteoarthritis were included in this study. Overhang was measured and recorded in every cut surface of femur with both gender-specific and traditional trial femoral components respectively in every patient. Then, the knees were divided into two groups according to the type of the permanent femoral component they received. Clinical and radiological outcomes were compared between 2 groups at minimum 3 years after operation. RESULTS: Mean follow-up duration was 41.3 months (range, 36 to 50 months). Sixty two knees (59.6%) showed femoral overhang at least in one area with a traditional trial component, while 26 knees (25.0%) did with a gender-specific trial component (p<0.001). In terms of range of motion, Hospital for Special Surgery knee score, radiographic result, patella tilt angle and displacement, no significant difference was observed between two groups. CONCLUSIONS: The use of gender-specific implants substantially reduced the incidence of femoral overhang but did not demonstrate any clinical, functional or radiologic benefit in short-term follow-up.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty , Female , Femur , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Incidence , Knee , Osteoarthritis , Patella , Range of Motion, Articular
20.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-120163

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate how much formal caregivers know about caring for stroke patients, and whether they adequately provide it. METHODS: Formal caregivers, who worked for stroke patients at 8 hospitals (including 4 university hospitals, 2 rehabilitation hospitals, and 2 convalescent hospitals) participated in this study. The survey was based on a self-report questionnaire, with 6 categories containing a total of 48 questions about the specific care of stroke patients: the demographic characteristics of the caregivers, bed positioning, the provision of meals, position changes and transfers, the range of motion exercises, and caregiver training. RESULTS: A total of 217 caregivers were surveyed, and they were distributed as follows: 41% came from the university hospitals, 35% came from the rehabilitation hospitals, and 24% came from the convalescent hospitals. The percentages of correct answers were distributed as follows: 64.3% for bed positioning, 74.3% for providing meals, and 62.4% for position change and transfer. The total and subscale scores of the caregivers working at convalescent hospitals were significantly lower than those of the caregivers working at the other types of hospitals (p<0.05). Only 7.8% of the total participants received training on a regular basis. The caregivers obtained most of the information from caregiver associations (58.1%), and the majority of the caregivers (65.4%) were willing to receive training. CONCLUSION: About one third (33.8%) of caregivers did not have adequate knowledge of how to properly care for stroke patients; in fact, a significant number of caregivers demonstrated inappropriate and insufficient knowledge in several areas. It is assumed that the provision of regular training, by rehabilitation experts, will improve the professionalism and knowledge of the caregivers, and positively affect patient outcomes.


Subject(s)
Caregivers , Education , Exercise , Hospitals, Convalescent , Hospitals, University , Humans , Meals , Nursing Care , Range of Motion, Articular , Rehabilitation , Stroke
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