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1.
Neurointervention ; : 35-42, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-741675

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to report the authors’ experience with external ventricular drainage (EVD) before endovascular treatment (EVT) in patients with acute aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and to investigate its relation to hemorrhagic complications. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between March 2010 and December 2017, a total of 122 patients were recruited who had an aSAH, underwent EVT to secure the ruptured aneurysm, and had EVD performed within 72 hours of rupture. The pre-embo EVD group (n=67) comprised patients who underwent EVD before EVT, and the post-embo EVD group (n=55) comprised those who underwent EVD after EVT. RESULTS: Overall, EVD-related hemorrhage occurred in 18 patients (14.8%): six (8.9%) in the pre-embo EVD group and 12 (21.8%) in the post-embo EVD group (P=0.065). No rebleeding occurred between EVD and EVT in the pre-embo EVD group. Clinical outcomes at discharge did not differ significantly between groups (P=0.384). At discharge, the final modified Rankin Scale score in patients who experienced pre-embo rebleeding was better in the pre-embo EVD group than in the post-embo EVD group (P=0.041). Current use of an antiplatelet agent or anticoagulant on admission (odds ratio [OR], 2.928; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.234–7.439; P=0.042) and stent use (OR, 2.430; 95% CI, 1.524–7.613; P=0.047) remained independent risk factors for EVD-related hemorrhagic complications. CONCLUSION: EVD before EVT in patients with aSAH in acute period did not increase the rate of rebleeding as well as EVD-related hemorrhagic complications. Thus, performing EVD before EVT may be beneficial by normalizing increased intracranial pressure. Especially in patients with rebleeding before the ruptured aneurysm is secured, pre-embo EVD may improve clinical outcomes at discharge.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Aneurysm, Ruptured , Drainage , Hemorrhage , Humans , Hydrocephalus , Intracranial Aneurysm , Intracranial Pressure , Risk Factors , Rupture , Stents , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-203984

ABSTRACT

The premammillary artery (PMA) is a branch of the posterior communicating artery (PCoA). While the PMA is known to originate from the PCoA as demonstrated by most anatomical studies, it originates directly from the internal carotid artery in approximately 1% of patients. Cerebral aneurysms associated with the PMA have rarely been reported. We report an extremely rare case of a ruptured PMA aneurysm that was managed using endovascular treatment.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Arteries , Carotid Artery, Internal , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm
3.
Korean Journal of Spine ; : 77-83, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-187212

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Computed tomography (CT), rather than conventional 2-dimensional radiography, was used to scan and measure pelvic parameters. The results were compared with measurements using X-ray. METHODS: Pelvic parameters were measured using both CT and X-ray in 254 patients who underwent both abdomino-pelvic CT and X-ray at the pelvic site. We assessed the similarity of the pelvic parameters between the 2 exams, as well as the correlations of pelvic parameters with sex and age. RESULTS: The mean values of the subjects’ pelvic parameters measured on X-ray were: sacral slope (SS), 31.6°; pelvic tilt (PT), 18.6°; and pelvic incidence (PI), 50.2°. The mean values measured on CT were: SS, 35.1°; PT, 11.9°; and PI, 47.0°. PT was found to be 4.07° higher on X-ray and 2.98° higher on CT in women, with these differences being statistically significant (p < 0.001, p < 0.001). PI was 4.10° higher on X-ray and 2.78° higher on CT in women, with these differences also being statistically significant (p < 0.001, p=0.009). We also observed a correlation between age and PI. For men, this correlation coefficient was 0.199 measured using X-ray and 0.184 measured using CT. For women, this correlation coefficient was 0.423 measured using X-ray and 0.372 measured using CT. CONCLUSION: When measured using CT compared to X-ray, SS increased by 3.5°, PT decreased by 6.7°, and PI decreased by 3.2°. There were also statistically significant differences in PT and PI between male and female subjects, while PI was found to increase with age.


Subject(s)
Age Factors , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Posture , Radiography , Sex Factors
4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-132128

ABSTRACT

We present a case of a subdural osteoma. A 29-year-old female presented with a 3-year history of headaches. Computed tomography scan revealed a homogeneous high-density lesion isolated from the inner table of the frontal bone (a lucent dural line) in the right frontal convexity. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an extra-axial lesion with a broad base without dural tail sign and punctate enhancement pattern characteristic of abundant adipose tissue. Upon surgical excision, we found a hard bony mass clearly demarcated from the dura. The mass displayed characteristics of an osteoma upon histological examination. The symptom was relieved after operation.


Subject(s)
Adipose Tissue , Adult , Brain Neoplasms , Female , Frontal Bone , Headache , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Meningioma , Osteoma , Tail
5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-132125

ABSTRACT

We present a case of a subdural osteoma. A 29-year-old female presented with a 3-year history of headaches. Computed tomography scan revealed a homogeneous high-density lesion isolated from the inner table of the frontal bone (a lucent dural line) in the right frontal convexity. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an extra-axial lesion with a broad base without dural tail sign and punctate enhancement pattern characteristic of abundant adipose tissue. Upon surgical excision, we found a hard bony mass clearly demarcated from the dura. The mass displayed characteristics of an osteoma upon histological examination. The symptom was relieved after operation.


Subject(s)
Adipose Tissue , Adult , Brain Neoplasms , Female , Frontal Bone , Headache , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Meningioma , Osteoma , Tail
6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-35424

ABSTRACT

An aneurysm of the distal superior cerebellar artery (SCA) is a highly rare disease. Fusiform aneurysms of the distal SCA are particularly challenging to treat. Clipping, trapping with or without bypass using microsurgery or endovascular treatment (EVT) were used to treat this condition. We describe the case of fusiform distal SCA aneurysms treated successfully with endovascular coiling with a 3-month follow-up. A 39 year-old male was presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and a 15 mm fusiform aneurysm of the ambient segment of the left distal SCA. EVT for parent artery occlusion and packing of the aneurysm was done. Left sixth nerve palsy appeared after 1 day of EVT. The symptom completely recovered within 1 week of the post-procedural period. No neurological deficit was seen during the clinical 3-month follow-up. EVT of fusiform distal SCA aneurysms with coils is a safe and feasible option to manage this rare condition. However, the treatment options must be carefully selected depending on the neurologic condition, development of collateral circulation, and configuration of the dissection.


Subject(s)
Abducens Nerve Diseases , Aneurysm , Arteries , Collateral Circulation , Endovascular Procedures , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Male , Microsurgery , Parents , Rare Diseases , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
7.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-36842

ABSTRACT

Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA), previously called Churg-Strauss syndrome, is an anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitis, accompanied by asthma, hypereosinophilia, nonfixed pulmonary infiltrates, and sinusitis. Peripheral neuropathy is common in patients with EGPA; however, a few cases of EGPA with central nervous system (CNS) involvement have been reported. A 45-year-old female referred for right side weakness and posterior neck pain was diagnosed as EGPA with subarachnoid hemorrhage and mononeuritis multiplex. She was effectively treated with a high dose glucocorticoid, cyclophosphamide, and intravenous immunoglobulin. EGPA with CNS involvement is uncommon and causes significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore more rapid and accurate diagnostic evaluation may be required. EGPA should be considered in patients with neurological symptoms and hypereosinophilia.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic , Asthma , Central Nervous System , Churg-Strauss Syndrome , Cyclophosphamide , Eosinophils , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulins , Middle Aged , Mononeuropathies , Mortality , Neck Pain , Peripheral Nervous System Diseases , Sinusitis , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage , Vasculitis
8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-28125

ABSTRACT

The pipeline embolization device (PED) is a new endovascular device for treatment of complex, fusiform and wide-neck intracranial aneurysms. The main mechanism of this stent is to divert the flow in the parent artery with reduction of inflow in the aneurysm leading to thrombosis. We treated a 40-year-old woman who had left facial pain and orbit discomfort. Angiography showed a giant fusiform aneurysm located in the cavernous segment of the left internal carotid artery. A PED was successfully deployed across the aneurysm. The procedure and post-procedural course were uneventful. After 3 months, angiography showed complete obliteration of the aneurysm with good patency of the branching vessels originating from the deployed segment. The patient's symptoms improved completely without complications.


Subject(s)
Adult , Aneurysm , Angiography , Arteries , Carotid Artery, Internal , Facial Pain , Female , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Orbit , Parents , Stents , Thrombosis
9.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-32506

ABSTRACT

A 56-year-old man had five nail gun-shots on his skull due to attempted suicide and was transferred to the emergency room. Because the nail head played a role as a brake, the launched nail made a hole in the skull but did not entirely pass through it. If major artery or sinuses are not involved, cautious retrieval after a small scalp incision can be performed and prophylactic antibiotics be administered for treatment.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents , Arteries , Craniocerebral Trauma , Emergency Service, Hospital , Head , Humans , Middle Aged , Scalp , Skull , Suicide, Attempted
10.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-13558

ABSTRACT

High-flow vertebral arteriovenous fistulas (VAVF) are rare complications of cervical spine surgery and characterized by iatrogenic direct-communication of the extracranial vertebral artery (VA) to the surrounding venous plexuses. The authors describe two patients with VAVF presenting with ischemic presentation after C1 pedicle screw insertion for a treatment of C2 fracture and nontraumatic atlatoaxial subluxation. The first patient presented with drowsy consciousness with blurred vision. The diffusion MRI showed an acute infarction on bilateral cerebellum and occipital lobes. The second patient presented with pulsatile tinnitus, dysarthria and a subjective weakness and numbness of extremities. In both cases, digital subtraction angiography demonstrated high-flow direct VAVFs adjacent to C1 screws. The VAVF of the second case occurred near the left posterior inferior cerebellar artery originated from the persistent first intersegmental artery of the left VA. Both cases were successfully treated by complete occlusion of the fistulous portion and the involved segment of the left VA using endovascular coil embolization. The authors reviewed the VAVFs after the upper-cervical spine surgery including C1 screw insertion and the feasibility with the attention notes of its endovascular treatment.


Subject(s)
Angiography, Digital Subtraction , Arteries , Arteriovenous Fistula , Cerebellum , Consciousness , Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Dysarthria , Embolization, Therapeutic , Extremities , Humans , Hypesthesia , Infarction , Occipital Lobe , Spine , Tinnitus , Vertebral Artery
11.
Neurointervention ; : 15-22, 2013.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-730224

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of the transfacial venous embolization of cavernous or paracavernous dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) in which approach via inferior petrosal sinus (IPS) was not feasible. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We identified the cases of transfacial venous embolization of cavernous sinus (CS) or adjacent dural sinuses from the neurointerventional database of three hospitals. The causes and clinical and angiographic outcomes of transfacial venous embolization were retrospectively evaluated. RESULTS: Twelve patients with CS (n = 11) or lesser wing of sphenoid sinus (LWSS, n = 1) DAVF were attempted to treat by transvenous embolization via ipsilateral (n = 10) or contralateral (n = 2) facial vein. Trans-IPS access to the target lesion was impossible due to chronic occlusion (n = 11) or acute angulation adjacent the target lesion (n = 1). In all twelve cases, it was possible to navigate through facial vein, angular vein, superior ophthalmic vein, and then CS. It was also possible to further navigation to contralateral CS through intercavernous sinus in two cases, and laterally into LWSS in one case. Post-treatment control angiography revealed complete occlusion of the DAVF in eleven cases and partial occlusion in one patient, resulting in complete resolution of presenting symptom in eight and gradually clinical improvement in four patients. There was no treatment-related complication during or after the procedure. CONCLUSION: In the cavernous or paracavernous DAVF in which trans-IPS approach is not feasible, the facial vein seems to be safe and effective alternative route for transvenous embolization.


Subject(s)
Angiography , Arteriovenous Fistula , Cavernous Sinus , Caves , Central Nervous System Vascular Malformations , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Sphenoid Sinus , Veins
12.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-63156

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate and compare the incidence of diffusion-weighted image (DWI) lesions between the Guglielmi detachable coil (GDC) and the Target coil for treating unruptured intracranial aneurysm. METHODS: From 2010 to 2011, consecutive 222 patients with an intracranial aneurysm underwent coil embolization. Inclusion criterias were : 1) unruptured intracranial aneurysm, 2) one or more GDC or Target coils used with or without other coils, 3) DWI examination within 24 hours after coiling, and 4) coiling performed without a balloon or stent. RESULTS: Ninety patients (92 cases) met the inclusion criteria. DWI lesions were detected in 55 (61.1%) of 90 patients. In the GDC group (n=44), DWI lesions were detected in 31 (70.5%). The average number of DWI lesions was 5.0+/-8.7 (mean+/-SD; range, 1-40) in aneurysm-related territory. In the Target coil group (n=48), DWI lesions were detected in 24 (50.0%). The number of DWI lesion was 2.1+/-5.4 (range, 1-32) in aneurysm-related territory. There was no significant correlation between a number of coils and DWI lesions. No significant differences were also observed in the number of DWI lesions in each group. CONCLUSION: The GDC and Target coils, which have an electrolytic detachable system, showed no differences in the incidence of DWI lesion.


Subject(s)
Humans , Incidence , Intracranial Aneurysm , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Retrospective Studies , Thromboembolism
13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-48922

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Spontaneous acute subdural hematomas (aSDH) secondary to ruptured intracranial aneurysms are rarely reported. This report reviews the clinical features, diagnostic modalities, treatments, and outcomes of this unusual and often fatal condition. METHODS: We performed a database search for all cases of intracranial aneurysms treated at our hospital between 2005 and 2010. Patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms who presented with aSDH on initial computed tomography (CT) were selected for inclusion. The clinical conditions, radiologic findings, treatments, and outcomes were assessed. RESULTS: A total of 551 patients were treated for ruptured intracranial aneurysms during the review period. We selected 23 patients (4.2%) who presented with spontaneous aSDH on initial CT. Ruptured aneurysms were detected on initial 3D-CT angiography in all cases. All ruptured aneurysms were located in the anterior portion of the circle of Willis. The World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grade on admission was V in 17 cases (73.9%). Immediate decompressive craniotomy was performed 22 cases (95.7%). Obliteration of the ruptured aneurysm was achieved in all cases. The Glasgow outcome scales for the cases were good recovery in 5 cases (21.7%), moderate disability to vegetative in 7 cases (30.4%), and death in 11 cases (47.8%). CONCLUSION: Spontaneous aSDH caused by a ruptured intracranial aneurysm is rare pattern of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. For early detection of aneurysm, 3D-CT angiography is useful. Early decompression with obliteration of the aneurysm is recommended. Outcomes were correlated with the clinical grade and CT findings on admission.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Aneurysm, Ruptured , Angiography , Circle of Willis , Craniotomy , Decompression , Hematoma, Subdural, Acute , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage , Weights and Measures
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-151474

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Percutaneous approach to the middle thoracic vertebra through the transpedicular route for the patients with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures is difficult due to the small size of the pedicle and parasagittally oriented vertebral body anatomy. The percutaneous vertebral body access (PVBA) technique utilizing the posterolateral extrapedicular approach avoids the pedicle and provides direct access to the vertebral body. The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the vertebroplasty utilizing PVBA technique for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures in the middle thoracic vertebrae. METHODS: A retrospective review was done on 20 patients who underwent vertebroplasty utilizing PVBA technique performed for painful osteoporotic compression fracture in the middle thoracic vertebrae at 22 levels from May 2003 to June 2006. The average amount of the injected cement was 1.5-2.5ml. The postprocedural outcome was assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS). RESULTS: The treated vertebrae were T5 (1 level), T6 (5 levels), T7 (7 levels), and T8 (9 levels). The compression rate and kyphotic angle were improved after procedure from 18%+/-13.4 to 16%+/-13.8 (p>0.05) and from 6.9degrees+/-6.7 to 6.6degrees+/-6.2 (p>0.05), respectively. Preprocedural VAS was 8.2+/-0.70 and was decreased to 2.1+/-1.02 (p<0.01) after treatment. Postprocedural cement leakage was noted in 3 levels (13.7%). There were no cases of leakage to epidural space or neural foramen, segmental artery injury, and pneumothorax. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the complication rates are low and good results can be achieved with vertebroplasty utilizing PVBA technique for the osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures especially in the middle thoracic vertebrae.


Subject(s)
Aneurysm , Fever , Humans , Hypertension , Leukocyte Count , Leukocytosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Smoke , Smoking , Subarachnoid Hemorrhage , Surgical Instruments , Vasospasm, Intracranial
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