Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 46
Filter
1.
The Korean Journal of Sports Medicine ; : 138-146, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-1003113

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Most rotator cuff repairs are performed under general anesthesia, and the shoulder muscles undergo exertion during the patient’s awakening. These may lead to subsequent retear. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the characteristics of shoulder muscle contraction during awakening from general anesthesia after rotator cuff repair. @*Methods@#Twenty patients underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Surface electromyography was used to investigate the amplitude of shoulder (upper trapezius [UT] and biceps brachii [BB]) and body (rectus femoris, RF) muscles during awakening in the operating room and resting in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU). @*Results@#The mean maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of the UT, BB, and RF during awakening were 28.00%, 27.84%, and 35.65%, and the mean durations of activation were 3.98, 2.50, and 2.71 seconds. In the PACU, the mean MVIC of the UT, BB, and RF were 27.18%, 25.03%, and 27.20%, and the mean durations were 2.72, 0.26, and 0.67 seconds. No correlation between muscle contraction and postoperative pain was identified. @*Conclusion@#Less than 10% of the involuntary muscle contractions of the UT and BB measured in this study exceeded 20% of the MVIC and the contractions lasted less than 4 seconds. As the percentage of the MVIC of the rotator cuff is typically lower than that of the UT and BB, strong contractions of the rotator cuff muscle with detrimental effects occur at a low frequency and short duration. Therefore, retear due to muscle contraction during awakening is unlikely.

2.
Clinics in Shoulder and Elbow ; : 302-305, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-1000227

ABSTRACT

The authors present a case of transient postoperative inferior subluxation of the shoulder after arthroscopic surgical stabilization for recurrent anterior dislocation. The patient was a 61-year-old woman with myasthenia gravis (MG). The first anterior shoulder dislocation occurred because of a fall to the ground. Despite a successful closed reduction, two more dislocations occurred in 3 weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an anterior labroligamentous periosteal sleeve avulsion (ALPSA) lesion, an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, and large tears of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons. The patient underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and ALPSA repair with a remplissage procedure. Intraoperatively, no tendency for instability was found; however, a widened glenohumeral joint space and inferior subluxation of the humeral head without functional compromise was observed on the day after surgery and disappeared spontaneously on radiographs 2 weeks later. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report documenting the occurrence of transient postoperative inferior subluxation of the shoulder in a patient with MG.

3.
Clinics in Orthopedic Surgery ; : 873-879, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-1000173

ABSTRACT

Rotator cuff tears are a condition characterized by damage to the muscles and tendons that connect the scapula and humerus, which are responsible for shoulder rotation and arm lifting. Metabolic factors such as diabetes, thyroid disease, high cholesterol, vitamin D deficiency, obesity, and smoking have been associated with an increased risk of rotator cuff tears. Interestingly, patients with hyperlipidemia, a condition characterized by high levels of cholesterol and other fats in the blood, have been found to have a higher incidence of rotator cuff tears and breakdown of tendon matrix. As a result, statin therapy, which is commonly used to lower cholesterol levels in hyperlipidemia, has been explored as a potential treatment to improve clinical outcomes in rotator cuff tears. However, the results of preclinical and clinical studies on the effects of statins on tendon healing in rotator cuff tears are limited and not well-defined. Moreover, since hyperlipidemia and rotator cuff tears are more prevalent in older individuals, a literature review on the efficacy and safety of statin therapy in this population is needed.

4.
The Korean Journal of Sports Medicine ; : 102-109, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-927104

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#This study aims to verify the preoperative factor that can affect the footprint coverage during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in full-thickness medium-size cuff tear and the change of footprint coverage on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at postoperative 6 months. @*Methods@#A total of 30 medium-size full-thickness rotator cuff tears were analyzed. They were classified into complete footprint coverage group (CC, n=19) and incomplete footprint coverage group (IC, n=11) by arthroscopic findings and immediate postoperative MRI findings. MRI was performed before the operation, 1 day after the operation, and 6 months after the operation. Preoperative MRI evaluated the size of the anteroposterior tear width (cm), length of retraction (cm), fatty infiltration, and muscle atrophy. Postoperatively, footprint coverage, fatty degeneration, and muscle atrophy were evaluated. We compared healing and change of fatty degeneration between two groups. @*Results@#The healing rate was significantly increased in the CC group (complete/partial healing, 10/9) compared to the IC group (complete/partial healing, 6/5) (p< 0.001). Six of 11 partial coverages (54.5%) were even improved to complete coverage at postoperative 6-month follow-up. However, the difference in footprint coverage did not affect the change of fatty degeneration at postoperative 6 months. Any change of fatty degeneration (FD) and initial FD of rotator cuff tendons were not correlated with healing (p< 0.05). @*Conclusion@#The footprint coverage can be changed in postoperative 6 months in MRI and anteroposterior tear size, retraction, fat degeneration, and muscle atrophy do not affect footprint coverage in medium-sized full-thickness rotator cuff tears.

5.
Clinics in Orthopedic Surgery ; : 426-433, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-937384

ABSTRACT

Background@#The purpose of this study was to compare the initial fixation strength between four different suture methods for the long head of the biceps. @*Methods@#Forty-eight fresh frozen porcine flexor hallucis longus tendons (mean width at suture site, 8.5 ± 0.9 mm) and phalanx bones were randomly assigned to one of the four arthroscopic biceps tenodesis techniques: simple stitch (SS), mattress suture (MS), lasso-loop (LL), and two simple stitches (2SS). A biceps tenodesis was performed according to the four techniques using all-suture type suture anchors (1.9-mm SUTUREFIX anchor with No. 1 ULTRABRAID sutures). Biomechanical evaluations were performed to test load to failure (N), stiffness (N/mm), stress (N/m 2 ), and mode of failure. @*Results@#As for the SS, MS, LL, and 2SS, the mean load to failure was 50.9 ± 14.61 N, 82.3 ± 24.8 N, 116.2 ± 26.7 N, and 130.8 ± 22.5 N (p < 0.001), respectively; mean stiffness was 6.1 ± 1.3 N/mm, 6.7 ± 2.6 N/mm, 7.8 ± 1.4 N/mm, and 8.1 ± 4.2 N/mm, respectively (p = 0.258); and mean stress was 0.7 ± 0.3 N/m 2 , 1.4 ± 0.8 N/m 2 , 2.9 ± 0.7 N/m 2 , and 2.7 ± 0.8 N/m 2 , respectively (p < 0.001). All the failures happened by the suture cutting through the tendon along its longitudinal fibers. @*Conclusions@#Neither the SS nor the MS method was enough to securely fix the biceps tendon with a significantly lower mechanical strength; however, the 2SS method showed similar initial fixation strength as the LL technique.

6.
Clinics in Shoulder and Elbow ; : 296-303, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-966750

ABSTRACT

Background@#A previous study reported that hyperlipidemia increases the incidence of tears in the rotator cuff tendon and affects healing after repair. The aim of our study was to compare the gene and protein expression of torn rotator cuff tendons in patients both with and without hypercholesterolemia. @*Methods@#Thirty patients who provided rotator cuff tendon samples were classified into either a non-hypercholesterolemia group (n=19, serum total cholesterol [TC] <200 mg/dL) and hypercholesterolemia group (n=11, serum TC ≥240 mg/dL) based on their concentrations of serum TC. The expression of various genes of interest, including COL1A1, IGF1, IL-6, MMP2, MMP3, MMP9, MMP13, TNMD, and TP53, was analyzed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). In addition, Western blot analysis was performed on the proteins encoded by interleukin (IL)-6 and TP53 that showed significantly different expression levels in real-time qRT-PCR. @*Results@#Except for IGF1, the gene expression levels of IL-6, MMP2, MMP9, and TP53 were significantly higher in the hypercholesterolemic group than in the non-hypercholesterolemia group. Western blot analysis confirmed significantly higher protein levels of IL-6 and TP53 in the hypercholesterolemic group (p<0.05). @*Conclusions@#We observed an increase in inflammatory cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) levels in hypercholesterolemic patients with rotator cuff tears. Increased levels of IL-6 and TP53 were observed at both the mRNA and protein levels. We suggest that the overexpression of IL-6 and TP53 may be a specific feature in rotator cuff disease patients with hypercholesterolemia.

7.
Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society ; : 933-943, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-915594

ABSTRACT

Objective@#: Percutaneous pedicle screw (PPS) fixation is a needle based procedure that requires fluoroscopic image guidance. Consequently, radiation exposure is inevitable for patients, surgeons, and operation room staff. We hypothesize that reducing the production of radiation emission will result in reduced radiation exposure for everyone in the operation room. Research was performed to evaluate reduction of radiation exposure by modifying imaging manner and mode of radiation source. @*Methods@#: A total of 170 patients (680 screws) who underwent fusion surgery with PPS fixation from September 2019 to March 2020 were analyzed in this study. Personal dosimeters (Polimaster Ltd.) were worn at the collar outside a lead apron to measure radiation exposure. Patients were assigned to four groups based on imaging manner of fluoroscopy and radiation modification (pulse mode with reduced dose) : continuous use without radiation modification (group 1, n=34), intermittent use without radiation modification (group 2, n=54), continuous use with radiation modification (group 3, n=26), and intermittent use with radiation modification (group 4, n=56). Post hoc Tukey Honest significant difference test was used for individual comparisons of radiation exposure/screw and fluoroscopic time/screw. @*Results@#: The average radiation exposure/screw was 71.45±45.75 μSv/screw for group 1, 18.77±11.51 μSv/screw for group 2, 19.58±7.00 μSv/screw for group 3, and 4.26±2.89 μSv/screw for group 4. By changing imaging manner from continuous multiple shot to intermittent single shot, 73.7% radiation reduction was achieved in the no radiation modification groups (groups 1, 2), and 78.2% radiation reduction was achieved in the radiation modification groups (groups 3, 4). Radiation source modification from continuous mode with standard dose to pulse mode with reduced dose resulted in 72.6% radiation reduction in continuous imaging groups (groups 1, 3) and 77.3% radiation reduction in intermittent imaging groups (groups 2, 4). The average radiation exposure/screw was reduced 94.1% by changing imaging manner and modifying radiation source from continuous imaging with standard fluoroscopy setting (group 1) to intermittent imaging with modified fluoroscopy setting (group 4). A total of 680 screws were reviewed postoperatively, and 99.3% (675) were evaluated as pedicle breach grade 0 (<2 mm). @*Conclusion@#: The average radiation exposure/screw for a spinal surgeon can be reduced 94.1% by changing imaging manner and modifying radiation source from real-time imaging with standard dose to intermittent imaging with modified dose. These modifications can be instantly applied to any procedure using fluoroscopic guidance and may reduce the overall radiation exposure of spine surgeons.

8.
Clinics in Shoulder and Elbow ; : 135-140, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-890291

ABSTRACT

Background@#We hypothesized in this study that the characteristics of retear cases vary according to surgeon volume and that surgical outcomes differ between primary and revision arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (revisional ARCR). @*Methods@#Surgeons performing more than 12 rotator cuff repairs (RCRs) per year were defined as high-volume surgeons, and those performing fewer than 12 RCRs were considered low-volume surgeons. Of the 47 patients who underwent revisional ARCR at our clinic enrolled in this study, 21 cases were treated by high-volume surgeons and 26 cases by low-volume surgeons. In all cases, the interval betweenprimary surgery and revisional ARCR, degree of “acromial scuffing,” number of anchors, RCR technique, retear pattern, fatty infiltration,retear size, operating time, and clinical outcome were recorded. @*Results@#During primary surgery, significantly more lateral anchors (p=0.004) were used, and the rate of use of the double-row repair technique was significantly higher (p<0.001) in the high- versus low-volume surgeon group. Moreover, the “cut-through pattern” was observedsignificantly more frequently among the cases treated by high- versus low-volume surgeons (p=0.008). The clinical outcomes after revisional ARCR were not different between the two groups. @*Conclusions@#Double-row repair during primary surgery and the cut-through pattern during revisional ARCR were more frequent in thehigh- versus low-volume surgeon groups. However, no differences in retear site or size, fatty infiltration grade, or outcomes were observedbetween the groups.

9.
Clinics in Shoulder and Elbow ; : 110-113, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-890271

ABSTRACT

We present an unusual case of bone metastases from renal cell carcinoma around orthopedic implants in a 78-year-old female with osteolytic, expansile, highly vascularized, malignant infiltration around suture anchors in the proximal humerus. The patient had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using suture anchor implants 6 years previously. After diagnosis of bone metastasis, she was successfully treated with metastasectomy and internal fixation using a plate and screws, with cement augmentation. This report is the first to document metastases around a suture anchor in a bone and suggests the vulnerability of suture anchor implants to tumor metastasis.

10.
Clinics in Shoulder and Elbow ; : 135-140, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-897995

ABSTRACT

Background@#We hypothesized in this study that the characteristics of retear cases vary according to surgeon volume and that surgical outcomes differ between primary and revision arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (revisional ARCR). @*Methods@#Surgeons performing more than 12 rotator cuff repairs (RCRs) per year were defined as high-volume surgeons, and those performing fewer than 12 RCRs were considered low-volume surgeons. Of the 47 patients who underwent revisional ARCR at our clinic enrolled in this study, 21 cases were treated by high-volume surgeons and 26 cases by low-volume surgeons. In all cases, the interval betweenprimary surgery and revisional ARCR, degree of “acromial scuffing,” number of anchors, RCR technique, retear pattern, fatty infiltration,retear size, operating time, and clinical outcome were recorded. @*Results@#During primary surgery, significantly more lateral anchors (p=0.004) were used, and the rate of use of the double-row repair technique was significantly higher (p<0.001) in the high- versus low-volume surgeon group. Moreover, the “cut-through pattern” was observedsignificantly more frequently among the cases treated by high- versus low-volume surgeons (p=0.008). The clinical outcomes after revisional ARCR were not different between the two groups. @*Conclusions@#Double-row repair during primary surgery and the cut-through pattern during revisional ARCR were more frequent in thehigh- versus low-volume surgeon groups. However, no differences in retear site or size, fatty infiltration grade, or outcomes were observedbetween the groups.

11.
Clinics in Shoulder and Elbow ; : 110-113, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-897975

ABSTRACT

We present an unusual case of bone metastases from renal cell carcinoma around orthopedic implants in a 78-year-old female with osteolytic, expansile, highly vascularized, malignant infiltration around suture anchors in the proximal humerus. The patient had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using suture anchor implants 6 years previously. After diagnosis of bone metastasis, she was successfully treated with metastasectomy and internal fixation using a plate and screws, with cement augmentation. This report is the first to document metastases around a suture anchor in a bone and suggests the vulnerability of suture anchor implants to tumor metastasis.

12.
The Korean Journal of Sports Medicine ; : 199-207, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-837324

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#We aimed to evaluate shoulder muscle activities during shoulder external rotation exercises using an elastic band with the arm at the side or at 90° of abduction in static and dynamic body positions. @*Methods@#In 2017, a total of 19 right-handed male subjects were included in this study. Surface electromyography signals were recorded from the anterior deltoid, middle deltoid, upper trapezius, lower trapezius, serratus anterior, and infraspinatus muscles. The subjects underwent maximal voluntary isometric contraction testing of each muscle in the W position or 90/90 position. Subjects performed the exercise in the sitting, static squat, static rotational squat, dynamic squat to standing (DSS), and dynamic squat to standing and trunk rotation (DSSR) positions. @*Results@#The main finding of this study was that shoulder external rotation exercises in the DSSR position were effective in reducing shoulder muscle activities except in the serratus anterior compared with static rotational squat position. @*Conclusion@#DSSR enabled effective control of scapular motion with less shoulder muscle activation. Therefore, the kinetic chain exercises incorporated with lower extremity, hip, or trunk would be beneficial for shoulder muscle exercises, which is required for patients with weak periscapular muscles, in whom the lower trapezius activities were found to be frequently decreased.

13.
The Korean Journal of Sports Medicine ; : 208-216, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-837323

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The aim of current study is to verify the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in neck and shoulder pain syndrome. @*Methods@#We enrolled 23 patients with neck and shoulder pain syndrome (mean age, 55±16 years; onset, 12.65±8.90 months) who underwent ESWT from July to December 2019. ESWT (4 to 5 bar or 0.23–0.45 mJ/mm 2 , 1,500 to 2,000 times/region, 7 Hz) was performed at least 4 consecutive times per week. Evaluated outcomes were visual analogue scale (VAS) of pain and tenderness, neck disability index (NDI), and shoulder passive range of motion (ROM; forward flexion [FF], external rotation at neutral [ER], internal rotation at back [IR]). Pain and tenderness VAS scores were assessed at every follow-up, while NDI and shoulder ROM were evaluated two times before treatment and at the final follw-up (at 4.52±0.73 weeks). @*Results@#The pain VAS score decreased from 5.5±2.4 at first visit to 4.0±1.8 (p=0.001), 3.3±2.1 (p=0.02), and 3.1±2.2 (p=0.29) at the first, second, and third follow-up visits. The tenderness VAS at first visit was 5.98±1.89, which decreased to 5.17±1.83 (p=0.005), 4.61±1.67 (p=0.05), and 4.09±1.92 (p=0.06) at the first, second, and third follow-up visits. NDI was significantly reduced from 18.04±8.86 to 10.04±6.94 at last follow-up (p=0.001) and shoulder ROM was significantly improved after treatment (FF: 159.6°±28.0° to 177.8°±8.5°, p=0.001; ER: 72.2±15.7° to 79.6±2.1°, p=0.02; IR: 10.2±3.49 [T 10] to 6.9±1.7 [T 7], p=0.001). @*Conclusion@#Consecutive ESWT was effective in treating neck and shoulder pain syndrome with functional improvement and pain reductio

14.
Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society ; : 767-776, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-833477

ABSTRACT

Objective@#: The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of posterior cervical foraminotomy (PCF) for adjacent segmental disease (ASD) after anterior cervical fusion (ACF). As ACF is accepted as the standard treatment for cervical spondylosis, many studies have been conducted to evaluate the efficacy of various surgical techniques to overcome symptomatic ASD after the previous surgery. Herein, PCF was performed for the treatment of symptomatic ASD and the feasibility of the surgery was evaluated. @*Methods@#: Forty nine patients who underwent PCF due to symptomatic ASD from August 2008 to November 2017 were identified. For demographic and perioperative data, the sex, age, types of previous surgery, ASD levels, operation times, and bleeding amount were recorded. The clinical outcome was assessed using the visual analogue scale for the neck and arm, the modified Odom’s criteria as well as neck disability index. Radiologic evaluations were performed by measuring disc softness, disc height, the cervical 2–7 sagittal vertical axis, cervical cobb angle, and facet violation. @*Results@#: Thirty-seven patients were enrolled in this study. The patients were divided into two groups based on the location of the pathology; paracentral (group P) or foramina (group F). Both groups showed significant clinical improvement (p0.05). @*Conclusion@#: PCF showed satisfactory clinical and radiologic outcomes for both paracentral and foraminal pathologies of ASD after ACF. Complications related to anterior revision were also avoided. PCF can be considered a feasible and safe surgical option for ASD after ACF.

15.
Clinics in Shoulder and Elbow ; : 95-100, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-739720

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes and complications of hook plate fixation in acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocations and distal clavicle fractures. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed a series of 60 consecutive patients with hook plate fixation for AC joint dislocation (group I) and distal clavicle fracture (group II). Groups I and II had 39 and 21 patients, respectively. Clinical results were evaluated using the pain visual analogue scale (VAS), simple shoulder test, and Constant-Murley scores. In addition, subacromial erosion and stiffness were evaluated as complications. RESULTS: At the removal, the pain VAS was 2.69 ± 1.30 and 4.10 ± 2.14 in groups I and II, respectively, which were significantly different (p=0.003). The simple shoulder test score was 9.59 ± 1.60 and 7.81 ± 2.67 in groups I and II, respectively, which were also significantly different (p=0.002). Subacromial erosion was significantly more frequent in group II (14/21 patients, 66.7%) than in group I (15/39 patients, 38.5%) (p=0.037), and stiffness was also higher in group II (17/21 patients, 81.0%) than in group I (22/39 patients, 56.4%), but it was not significant. CONCLUSIONS: Hook plate fixation showed good clinical and functional results for the treatment of acute unstable AC joint dislocation and distal clavicle fracture. But, in distal clavicle fractures, there are more subacromial erosion and stiffness compare with acute unstable AC joint dislocation.


Subject(s)
Humans , Acromioclavicular Joint , Clavicle , Joint Dislocations , Joints , Retrospective Studies , Shoulder
16.
Clinics in Shoulder and Elbow ; : 22-29, 2018.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-739714

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study is performed to evaluate anchor-related outcomes and complications after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair using 30% β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) with 70% poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) biocomposite suture anchors. METHODS: A total of 78 patients (mean age, 61.3 ± 6.9 years) who underwent arthroscopic medium-to-large full-thickness rotator cuff tear repair were enrolled. The technique employed 30% β-TCP with 70% PLGA biocomposite suture anchors at the medial row (38 patients, Healix BRTM anchor [Healix group]; 40 patients, Fixone anchor B [Fixone group]). The radiologic outcomes (including perianchor cyst formation or bone substitution) and anatomical outcomes of the healing failure rate were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging at least 6 months after surgery, the pain visual analogue scale at 3, 6 months, and final follow-up visit, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores at least 1 year postoperatively. Anchor-related complications were also evaluated. RESULTS: The perianchor cyst formation incidence was similar for both groups (60.5%, Healix group; 60.0%, Fixone group; p=0.967), although severe perianchor cyst incidence was slightly lower in the Fixone group (15.0%) than in the Healix group (21.1%). There was no occurrence of anchor absorption and bone substitution. No differences were observed in the healing failure rate (13.2%, Healix group; 15.0%, Fixone group; p=0.815) and functional outcome between groups (all p>0.05). Anchor breakage occurred in 5 patients (2 Healix anchors and 3 Fixone anchors); however, there were no major anchor-related complications in either group. CONCLUSIONS: No differences were observed in the clinical outcomes of the Healix and Fixone groups, neither were there any accompanying major anchor-related complications.


Subject(s)
Humans , Absorption , Elbow , Follow-Up Studies , Incidence , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Rotator Cuff , Shoulder , Surgeons , Suture Anchors , Sutures , Tears
17.
Journal of the Korean Shoulder and Elbow Society ; : 172-179, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-770805

ABSTRACT

Indications of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) have been consistently extended by technical advancements in reverse arthroplasty prosthesis, continuous development of the implants, accumulated experiences and its successful treatment outcomes; accordingly, its use has rapidly increased. RTSA has been performed for a variety of indications, with variable outcomes depending on the initial diagnosis. However, controversial opinions still exist regarding the design of reverse arthroplasty prosthesis (medialized or lateralized design and the neck-shaft angle of the humeral prosthesis), suture of the subscapularis tendon, use of cement during placement of the humeral prosthesis, and surgical procedures; therefore, these should be investigated so that they can be better understood.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty , Diagnosis , Prostheses and Implants , Shoulder , Sutures , Tendons
18.
Journal of the Korean Shoulder and Elbow Society ; : 77-83, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-770801

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although there have been multiple reports on surgical outcomes of superior labral anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions in overhead athletes, only a few reports exist in the literature about the results of nonoperative treatment in elite (collegiate or professional) overhead athletes. To determine the clinical outcomes of nonoperative treatment of SLAP lesions in elite overhead athletes. METHODS: Between January 2006 and December 2011, 69 patients were selected. Initial arthroscopic SLAP repair was performed in 19 patients and of the 50 patients who underwent nonsurgical treatment, such as range of motion gain and periscapular muscle strengthening, 14 patients were converted to surgical treatment; 5 patients were lost to follow-up. Medical records of 31 elite overhead athletes who underwent nonsurgical treatment were retrospectively reviewed. Four clinical outcome measures were used: visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, VAS for satisfaction, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and subjective feeling of recovery. RESULTS: The average follow-up period was 35.9 months (range, 24–62 months). The VAS for pain decreased from 6.5 to 2.2 (p<0.01) and VAS for satisfaction was 7.6. The ASES score increased from 54.1 to 85.9 (p<0.01). The overall average value of subjective feeling of recovery was 72%. Twenty-three out of 31 elite athletes (74.2%) returned to play after rehabilitation; these 23 athletes performed at the same or higher levels after rehabilitation. CONCLUSIONS: Nonsurgical treatment in elite overhead athletes with SLAP lesion should be considered as a treatment option.


Subject(s)
Humans , Athletes , Elbow , Follow-Up Studies , Lost to Follow-Up , Medical Records , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Range of Motion, Articular , Rehabilitation , Retrospective Studies , Return to Sport , Shoulder , Surgeons , Tears
19.
Clinics in Shoulder and Elbow ; : 172-179, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-96466

ABSTRACT

Indications of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) have been consistently extended by technical advancements in reverse arthroplasty prosthesis, continuous development of the implants, accumulated experiences and its successful treatment outcomes; accordingly, its use has rapidly increased. RTSA has been performed for a variety of indications, with variable outcomes depending on the initial diagnosis. However, controversial opinions still exist regarding the design of reverse arthroplasty prosthesis (medialized or lateralized design and the neck-shaft angle of the humeral prosthesis), suture of the subscapularis tendon, use of cement during placement of the humeral prosthesis, and surgical procedures; therefore, these should be investigated so that they can be better understood.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty , Diagnosis , Prostheses and Implants , Shoulder , Sutures , Tendons
20.
Clinics in Shoulder and Elbow ; : 77-83, 2017.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-202505

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although there have been multiple reports on surgical outcomes of superior labral anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions in overhead athletes, only a few reports exist in the literature about the results of nonoperative treatment in elite (collegiate or professional) overhead athletes. To determine the clinical outcomes of nonoperative treatment of SLAP lesions in elite overhead athletes. METHODS: Between January 2006 and December 2011, 69 patients were selected. Initial arthroscopic SLAP repair was performed in 19 patients and of the 50 patients who underwent nonsurgical treatment, such as range of motion gain and periscapular muscle strengthening, 14 patients were converted to surgical treatment; 5 patients were lost to follow-up. Medical records of 31 elite overhead athletes who underwent nonsurgical treatment were retrospectively reviewed. Four clinical outcome measures were used: visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, VAS for satisfaction, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and subjective feeling of recovery. RESULTS: The average follow-up period was 35.9 months (range, 24–62 months). The VAS for pain decreased from 6.5 to 2.2 (p<0.01) and VAS for satisfaction was 7.6. The ASES score increased from 54.1 to 85.9 (p<0.01). The overall average value of subjective feeling of recovery was 72%. Twenty-three out of 31 elite athletes (74.2%) returned to play after rehabilitation; these 23 athletes performed at the same or higher levels after rehabilitation. CONCLUSIONS: Nonsurgical treatment in elite overhead athletes with SLAP lesion should be considered as a treatment option.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL