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1.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-874203

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Proper use of antibiotics during emergency abdominal surgery is essential in reducing the incidence of surgical site infection. However, no studies have investigated the type of antibiotics and duration of therapy in individuals with abdominal trauma in Korea. We aimed to investigate the status of initial antibiotic therapy in patients with solitary abdominal trauma. @*Methods@#From January 2015 to December 2015, we retrospectively analyzed the medical records of patients with solitary abdominal trauma from 17 institutions including regional trauma centers in South Korea. Both blunt and penetrating abdominal injuries were included. Time from arrival to initial antibiotic therapy, rate of antibiotic use upon injury mechanism, injured organ, type, and duration of antibiotic use, and postoperative infection were investigated. @*Results@#Data of the 311 patients were collected. The use of antibiotic was initiated in 96.4% of patients with penetrating injury and 79.7% with blunt injury. Initial antibiotics therapy was provided to 78.2% of patients with solid organ injury and 97.5% with hollow viscus injury. The mean day of using antibiotics was 6 days in solid organ injuries, 6.2 days in hollow viscus. Infection within 2 weeks of admission occurred in 36 cases. Infection was related to injury severity (Abbreviated Injury Scale of >3), hollow viscus injury, operation, open abdomen, colon perforation, and RBC transfusion. There was no infection in cases with laparoscopic operation. Duration of antibiotics did not affect the infection rate. @*Conclusion@#Antibiotics are used extensively (84.2%) and for long duration (6.2 days) in patients with abdominal injury in Korea.

2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-898891

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The outcomes of non-trauma patients requiring intra-abdominal gauze packing for the management of uncontrollable hemorrhage following surgery, and the evaluation of survival risk factors were examined. @*Methods@#Data from patients who underwent intra-abdominal gauze packing to control bleeding during abdominal surgery between September 2012 and March 2019 were retrospectively reviewed. @*Results@#A total of 28 patients were included in the study population analysis. There were 9 patients who died during hospitalization. One patient died as a result of uncontrolled bleeding. In spite of gauze packing, 2 patients who had increasing blood transfusion requirements (> 4 packs/4 hours) were found to have arterial bleeding. Univariate analysis for hospital death showed that immunocompromised status, emergency surgery, a thrombocytopenic state prior to initial surgery, and a longer duration until gauze removal had a negative association with survival outcomes. Among these factors, only time to gauze removal > 36 hours was identified as an independent risk factor for survival outcome in the multivariate analysis. @*Conclusions@#Gauze packing could be considered as an effective method for the management of uncontrolled hemorrhage, in non-trauma patients. In cases of persistent bleeding after gauze packing, arterial bleeding should be suspected. Gauze removal after > 36 hours may indicate a poor survival outcome.

3.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-891187

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#The outcomes of non-trauma patients requiring intra-abdominal gauze packing for the management of uncontrollable hemorrhage following surgery, and the evaluation of survival risk factors were examined. @*Methods@#Data from patients who underwent intra-abdominal gauze packing to control bleeding during abdominal surgery between September 2012 and March 2019 were retrospectively reviewed. @*Results@#A total of 28 patients were included in the study population analysis. There were 9 patients who died during hospitalization. One patient died as a result of uncontrolled bleeding. In spite of gauze packing, 2 patients who had increasing blood transfusion requirements (> 4 packs/4 hours) were found to have arterial bleeding. Univariate analysis for hospital death showed that immunocompromised status, emergency surgery, a thrombocytopenic state prior to initial surgery, and a longer duration until gauze removal had a negative association with survival outcomes. Among these factors, only time to gauze removal > 36 hours was identified as an independent risk factor for survival outcome in the multivariate analysis. @*Conclusions@#Gauze packing could be considered as an effective method for the management of uncontrolled hemorrhage, in non-trauma patients. In cases of persistent bleeding after gauze packing, arterial bleeding should be suspected. Gauze removal after > 36 hours may indicate a poor survival outcome.

4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-898884

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an uncommon but serious complication after trauma. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics, risk factors, and outcomes of AKI after trauma. @*Methods@#A retrospective cohort study of 386 trauma patients who visited the emergency department at the Asan Medical Center between January 2012 and December 2013 was performed. There were 322 patients included in this study. Patients were assigned into the AKI group and no AKI group. Regression analysis was performed to identify the factors associated with development of AKI following trauma. @*Results@#The overall incidence of AKI following trauma was 6%. There was no difference in patients`age, sex, and body weight between groups. Whereas there was a significant difference in Injury Severity Score, Glasgow Coma Scale, presence of shock, need for a transfusion, lactic acid levels, and severe rhabdomyolysis. In multivariate analysis, the independent risk factors associated with AKI after trauma included the Injury Severity Score [odds ratio (OR) = 1.065, p < 0.01], presence of shock (OR = 3.949, p = 0.012), and severe rhabdomyolysis (OR = 4.475, p < 0.01). Patients in the AKI group were classified (according to the RIFLE criteria) as at Risk in 9 cases (43%), Injury present in 3 (14%), Failure in 7 (33%), Loss in 0 (0%) and End-stage in 2 (10%). Renal replacement therapy was required for 10 patients (47%) in the AKI group and 4 of them (40%) underwent successful weaning. Hospital mortality rate was higher in the AKI group (5/21, 23%) than the no AKI group (3/301, 1% ; p < 0.01). @*Conclusion@#The development of AKI was associated with the severity of trauma, and trauma increased mortality rates.

5.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 705-716, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-897707

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is usually performed on patients with chronic underlying diseases in the general ward (GW). This study evaluated the clinical outcomes of PEG performed on patients in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) compared with those of PEG performed in the GW. @*Methods@#The medical records of 27 patients in the SICU and 263 in the GW, who underwent PEG between January 2013 and July 2017, were retrospectively reviewed. @*Results@#The median age of the 27 SICU patients was 66 years, and their median body mass index was 21.1 kg/m2. In the SICU group, the median baseline Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score was 4, and the median Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score was 16. The median interval between surgery and PEG in SICU patients was 30 days, with a PEG failure rate of 3.7%. Acute complications in SICU patients included bleeding (7.4%) and ileus (11.1%), while chronic complications included aspiration pneumonia (7.4%) and tube obstruction (3.7%). The rates of acute and chronic complications did not differ significantly between the SICU and GW groups. The 30-day mortality rate was 14.8% in SICU patients and 5.3% in GW patients (p=0.073). @*Conclusions@#PEG is a safe and feasible method of enteral feeding for critically ill patients who require ICU care after surgery.

6.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-891180

ABSTRACT

Purpose@#Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an uncommon but serious complication after trauma. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics, risk factors, and outcomes of AKI after trauma. @*Methods@#A retrospective cohort study of 386 trauma patients who visited the emergency department at the Asan Medical Center between January 2012 and December 2013 was performed. There were 322 patients included in this study. Patients were assigned into the AKI group and no AKI group. Regression analysis was performed to identify the factors associated with development of AKI following trauma. @*Results@#The overall incidence of AKI following trauma was 6%. There was no difference in patients`age, sex, and body weight between groups. Whereas there was a significant difference in Injury Severity Score, Glasgow Coma Scale, presence of shock, need for a transfusion, lactic acid levels, and severe rhabdomyolysis. In multivariate analysis, the independent risk factors associated with AKI after trauma included the Injury Severity Score [odds ratio (OR) = 1.065, p < 0.01], presence of shock (OR = 3.949, p = 0.012), and severe rhabdomyolysis (OR = 4.475, p < 0.01). Patients in the AKI group were classified (according to the RIFLE criteria) as at Risk in 9 cases (43%), Injury present in 3 (14%), Failure in 7 (33%), Loss in 0 (0%) and End-stage in 2 (10%). Renal replacement therapy was required for 10 patients (47%) in the AKI group and 4 of them (40%) underwent successful weaning. Hospital mortality rate was higher in the AKI group (5/21, 23%) than the no AKI group (3/301, 1% ; p < 0.01). @*Conclusion@#The development of AKI was associated with the severity of trauma, and trauma increased mortality rates.

7.
Clinical Endoscopy ; : 705-716, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-890003

ABSTRACT

Background/Aims@#Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is usually performed on patients with chronic underlying diseases in the general ward (GW). This study evaluated the clinical outcomes of PEG performed on patients in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) compared with those of PEG performed in the GW. @*Methods@#The medical records of 27 patients in the SICU and 263 in the GW, who underwent PEG between January 2013 and July 2017, were retrospectively reviewed. @*Results@#The median age of the 27 SICU patients was 66 years, and their median body mass index was 21.1 kg/m2. In the SICU group, the median baseline Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score was 4, and the median Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score was 16. The median interval between surgery and PEG in SICU patients was 30 days, with a PEG failure rate of 3.7%. Acute complications in SICU patients included bleeding (7.4%) and ileus (11.1%), while chronic complications included aspiration pneumonia (7.4%) and tube obstruction (3.7%). The rates of acute and chronic complications did not differ significantly between the SICU and GW groups. The 30-day mortality rate was 14.8% in SICU patients and 5.3% in GW patients (p=0.073). @*Conclusions@#PEG is a safe and feasible method of enteral feeding for critically ill patients who require ICU care after surgery.

8.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-811106

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Unstable pelvic fracture with bleeding can be fatal, with a mortality rate of up to 40%. Therefore, early detection and treatment are important in unstable pelvic trauma. We investigated the early predictive factors for possible embolization in patients with hemodynamically unstable pelvic trauma.METHODS: From January 2011 to December 2013, 46 patients with shock arrived at a single hospital within 24 hours after injury. Of them, 44 patients underwent CT scan after initial resuscitation, except for 2 who were dead on arrival. Nine patients with other organ injuries were excluded. Seventeen patients underwent embolization. A single radiologist measured the width (longest length in axial view) and length (longest length in coronal view) of pelvic hematoma on CT scans. Demographic, clinical, and radiological data were reviewed retrospectively.RESULTS: Among 35 patients with hemodynamically unstable pelvic fracture, 22 (62.9%) were men. Width (P = 0.002) and length (P = 0.006) of hematoma on CT scans were significantly different between the embolization and nonembolization groups. The predictors of embolization were width of pelvic hematoma (odds ratio [OR], 1.07; P = 0.028) and female sex (OR, 10.83; P = 0.031). The cutoff value was 3.35 cm. More embolization was performed (OR, 12.00; P = 0.003) and higher mortality was observed in patients with hematoma width >3.35 cm (OR, 4.96; P = 0.048).CONCLUSION: Patients with hemodynamically unstable pelvic trauma have a high mortality rate. CT is useful for the initial identification of the need for embolization among these patients. The width of pelvic hematoma can predict possible embolization in patients with unstable pelvic trauma.


Subject(s)
Embolization, Therapeutic , Female , Fractures, Bone , Hematoma , Hemorrhage , Humans , Male , Mortality , Resuscitation , Retrospective Studies , Shock , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
9.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-764379

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Nutritional therapy (NT), such as enteral nutrition (EN) or parenteral nutrition (PN), is essential for the malnourished patients. Although the complications related to NT has been well described, multicenter data on symptoms in the patients with receiving NT during hospitalization are still lacking. METHODS: Nutrition support team (NST) consultations, on which NT-related complications were described, were collected retrospectively for one year. The inclusion criteria were patients who were (1) older than 18 years, (2) hospitalized, and (3) receiving EN or PN at the time of NST consultation. The patients' demographics (age, sex, body mass index [BMI]), type of NT and type of complication were collected. To compare the severity of each complication, the intensive care unit (ICU) admission, hospital stay, and type of discharge were also collected. RESULTS: A total of 14,600 NT-related complications were collected from 13,418 cases from 27 hospitals in Korea. The mean age and BMI were 65.4 years and 21.8 kg/m2. The complications according to the type of NT, calorie deficiency (32.4%, n=1,229) and diarrhea (21.6%, n=820) were most common in EN. Similarly, calorie deficiency (56.8%, n=4,030) and GI problem except for diarrhea (8.6%, n=611) were most common in PN. Regarding the clinical outcomes, 18.7% (n=2,158) finally expired, 58.1% (n=7,027) were admitted to ICU, and the mean hospital days after NT-related complication were 31.3 days. Volume overload (odds ratio [OR]=3.48) and renal abnormality (OR=2.50) were closely associated with hospital death; hyperammonemia (OR=3.09) and renal abnormality (OR=2.77) were associated with ICU admission; “micronutrient and vitamin deficiency” (geometric mean [GM]=2.23) and volume overload (GM=1.61) were associated with a longer hospital stay. CONCLUSION: NT may induce or be associated with several complications, and some of them may seriously affect the patient's outcome. NST personnel in each hospital should be aware of each problem during nutritional support.


Subject(s)
Adult , Body Mass Index , Demography , Diarrhea , Enteral Nutrition , Hospitalization , Humans , Hyperammonemia , Intensive Care Units , Korea , Length of Stay , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Nutrition Therapy , Nutritional Support , Parenteral Nutrition , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , Vitamins
10.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-764193

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Mangled injury is defined as severe injury, including three or more tissues such as bones, nerves, vessels, muscles, and tendons in the upper or lower extremities. The choice of treatment results in different cosmetic and functional outcomes for mangled injury. In this study, we estimated patients' quality of life after treatment with the future intention of having patients make proper decisions at the time of injury. METHODS: Twenty patients were treated at Asan Medical Center from January, 2009 to November, 2011, and 11 patients were included who agreed with the questionnaire. We used 36-item short form health survey (SF-36) for estimating quality of life after treatments. RESULTS: Subjective satisfaction of cosmetic and functional aspects was higher in the reconstruction group than in the amputation group. However, in the estimation of specified satisfaction using SF-36, the amputation group was more satisfied than the reconstruction group. CONCLUSION: Among the many treatment considerations at the time of injury, expected cosmetic and functional outcomes were important parts determining the decision. In our study, the amputation group showed a better satisfaction level. This result could help patients make more appropriate decisions in the case of mangled injury.


Subject(s)
Amputation , Health Surveys , Humans , Intention , Limb Salvage , Lower Extremity , Muscles , Quality of Life , Tendons
11.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-766561

ABSTRACT

Abdominal sepsis is mainly caused by intra-abdominal or retroperitoneal infection; therefore, early detection of the source of infection and adequate, prompt treatment are the most important contributors to patient outcomes. Because patients with sepsis often receive emergency abdominal surgery after regular hours, and most patients need critical care postoperatively, the need for personnel to specialize in these areas has emerged. The concept of acute care surgery (ACS), which includes trauma care, emergency general surgery, and surgical critical care, has been discussed since the early 2000s, and ACS fellowships were launched in the United States in 2008. ACS teams have been found to reduce mortality and complication rates, to decrease the time to surgery, and to lower financial costs in comparison to the traditional surgical model. In Korea, a regional trauma center project was started in 2012, and the government provided funding for each trauma center as part of this project. In the ACS field, the system for non-trauma emergency surgery is currently in the early stages of discussion. The need for such a system has been accelerated by the reduction of working hours per week of residents, as well as the shortage of manpower for emergency general surgery and surgical critical care on the night shift. In this review, we discuss the manpower problems that impact the treatment of abdominal emergency patients, and consider ways in which the Korean ACS system can treat these patients professionally.


Subject(s)
Abdomen, Acute , Abdominal Injuries , Critical Care , Emergencies , Fellowships and Scholarships , Financial Management , Humans , Korea , Models, Anatomic , Mortality , Sepsis , Trauma Centers , United States
12.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-916194

ABSTRACT

Abdominal sepsis is mainly caused by intra-abdominal or retroperitoneal infection; therefore, early detection of the source of infection and adequate, prompt treatment are the most important contributors to patient outcomes. Because patients with sepsis often receive emergency abdominal surgery after regular hours, and most patients need critical care postoperatively, the need for personnel to specialize in these areas has emerged. The concept of acute care surgery (ACS), which includes trauma care, emergency general surgery, and surgical critical care, has been discussed since the early 2000s, and ACS fellowships were launched in the United States in 2008. ACS teams have been found to reduce mortality and complication rates, to decrease the time to surgery, and to lower financial costs in comparison to the traditional surgical model. In Korea, a regional trauma center project was started in 2012, and the government provided funding for each trauma center as part of this project. In the ACS field, the system for non-trauma emergency surgery is currently in the early stages of discussion. The need for such a system has been accelerated by the reduction of working hours per week of residents, as well as the shortage of manpower for emergency general surgery and surgical critical care on the night shift. In this review, we discuss the manpower problems that impact the treatment of abdominal emergency patients, and consider ways in which the Korean ACS system can treat these patients professionally.

13.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-719662

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: A task force appointed by the Korean Society of Acute Care Surgery reviewed previously published guidelines on antibiotic use in patients with abdominal injuries and adapted guidelines for Korea. METHODS: Four guidelines were assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II instrument. Five topics were considered: indication for antibiotics, time until first antibiotic use, antibiotic therapy duration, appropriate antibiotics, and antibiotic use in abdominal trauma patients with hemorrhagic shock. RESULTS: Patients requiring surgery need preoperative prophylactic antibiotics. Patients who do not require surgery do not need antibiotics. Antibiotics should be administered as soon as possible after injury. In the absence of hollow viscus injury, no additional antibiotic doses are needed. If hollow viscus injury is repaired within 12 hours, antibiotics should be continued for ≤ 24 hours. If hollow viscus injury is repaired after 12 hours, antibiotics should be limited to 7 days. Antibiotics can be administered for ≥7 days if hollow viscus injury is incompletely repaired or clinical signs persist. Broad-spectrum aerobic and anaerobic coverage antibiotics are preferred as the initial antibiotics. Second-generation cephalosporins are the recommended initial antibiotics. Third-generation cephalosporins are alternative choices. For hemorrhagic shock, the antibiotic dose may be increased twofold or threefold and repeated after transfusion of every 10 units of blood until there is no further blood loss. CONCLUSION: Although this guideline was drafted through adaptation of other guidelines, it may be meaningful in that it provides a consensus on the use of antibiotics in abdominal trauma patients in Korea.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Injuries , Advisory Committees , Anti-Bacterial Agents , Antibiotic Prophylaxis , Cephalosporins , Consensus , Humans , Korea , Shock, Hemorrhagic
14.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-764859

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Malnutrition is associated with many adverse clinical outcomes. The present study aimed to identify the prevalence of malnutrition in hospitalized patients in Korea, evaluate the association between malnutrition and clinical outcomes, and ascertain the risk factors of malnutrition. METHODS: A multicenter cross-sectional study was performed with 300 patients recruited from among the patients admitted in 25 hospitals on January 6, 2014. Nutritional status was assessed by using the Subjective Global Assessment (SGA). Demographic characteristics and underlying diseases were compared according to nutritional status. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the risk factors of malnutrition. Clinical outcomes such as rate of admission in intensive care units, length of hospital stay, and survival rate were evaluated. RESULTS: The prevalence of malnutrition in the hospitalized patients was 22.0%. Old age (≥ 70 years), admission for medical treatment or diagnostic work-up, and underlying pulmonary or oncological disease were associated with malnutrition. Old age and admission for medical treatment or diagnostic work-up were identified to be risk factors of malnutrition in the multivariate analysis. Patients with malnutrition had longer hospital stay (SGA A = 7.63 ± 6.03 days, B = 9.02 ± 9.96 days, and C = 12.18 ± 7.24 days, P = 0.018) and lower 90-day survival rate (SGA A = 97.9%, B = 90.7%, and C = 58.3%, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Malnutrition was common in hospitalized patients, and resulted in longer hospitalization and associated lower survival rate. The rate of malnutrition tended to be higher when the patient was older than 70 years old or hospitalized for medical treatment or diagnostic work-up compared to elective surgery.


Subject(s)
Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Korea , Length of Stay , Logistic Models , Malnutrition , Multivariate Analysis , Nutrition Assessment , Nutritional Status , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Survival Rate
15.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-916924

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE@#Patients with diffuse axonal injury experience various disabilities and have a high cost of treatment. Recent researches have revealed the underlying mechanism and pathogenesis of diffuse axonal injury. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between the radiological grading of diffuse axonal injury and the clinical outcomes of patients.@*METHODS@#From January 2011 to December 2016, among 294 patients with traumatic brain injury, 44 patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A total of 18 patients were enrolled in this study except for other cerebral injuries, such as cerebral hemorrhage or hypoxic brain damage. Demographic data, clinical data, and radiological findings were retrospectively reviewed. The grading of diffuse axonal injury was analyzed based on patient's MRI findings.@*RESULTS@#For the most severe diffuse axonal injury patients, prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) stay (p=0.035), hospital stay (p=0.012), and prolonged mechanical ventilation (p=0.030) were observed. However, there was no significant difference in healthcare-associated infection rates between MRI grading (p=0.123). Massive transfusion, initial hemoglobin and lactate levels, and MRI gradings were found to be highly significant in predicting the duration of unconsciousness.@*CONCLUSIONS@#This study showed that patients with high grade diffuse axonal injury have prolonged ICU stays and significantly longer hospital stays. Deteriorated mental patients with high energy injuries should be evaluated to identify diffuse axonal injuries by using an appropriate imaging tool, such as MRI. It will be important to predict the duration of consciousness recovery using MRI scans.

16.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-916917

ABSTRACT

Managing large infected midline abdominal defects are clinically challenging and technically demanding. The alloplastic materials, regional flaps, and component separation are usually infeasible because of the size, location, depth, and state of the defects. In these cases, the free flap is the only option with a large well-vascularized tissue that is free to inset regardless of the location. Herein, we report a case of 44-year-old man with a large infected midline abdominal wall defect who was completely treated with a latissimus dorsi myocutaeous free flap followed by negative pressure wound therapy.

17.
Article in Korean | WPRIM | ID: wpr-717780

ABSTRACT

The concept of acute care surgery (ACS) incorporates trauma, surgical critical care, and emergency general surgery. It was designed in the early 2000s by the United States as a solution to the looming crisis of trauma care and non-trauma emergency surgery. Reduced surgical opportunities for trauma surgeons resulted in a decreased interest in trauma surgery. Surgical sub-specialization further accelerated an indifference towards trauma and emergency general surgery. Started in 2008, the trauma center project in Korea is still in its infancy. Although the need for ACS was presented since the inception of the trauma center project, there was a lack of implementation at trauma centers due to government regulations. However, ACS has been initiated at several non-trauma center hospitals and is mainly operated by surgical intensivists. Studies demonstrate that adding emergency surgery to a trauma service does not compromise the care of the injured patients, despite an increase in trauma volume. Positive impacts of ACS are reported by numerous researches. We believe that the development and advancement of trauma centers will necessitate a discussion for the implementation of the ACS model at trauma centers in Korea.


Subject(s)
Critical Care , Emergencies , Government Regulation , Humans , Korea , Surgeons , Trauma Centers , United States
18.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-717778

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) are more susceptible to nosocomial infections, including central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), surgical site infection, urinary tract infection or ventilator-associated pneumonia. This study is a comparative analysis of how central venous catheter (CVC) management staff affects CLABSI. METHODS: We performed a two-phase review of all patients transferred to the surgical ICU (SICU) from January 2013 to June 2014. CVC management staff was introduced in October 2013. Electronic medical records provided the data for a comparative analysis of incidence rates and risks of CLABSI, as well as the subjects' general characteristics. RESULTS: This study included 248 patients before the introduction of a CVC management staff member and 196 patients after the introduction. General patient characteristics before and after the CVC management staff was in place did not differ significantly. The CLABSI rate decreased by 4.61 cases/1,000 device days after the introduction (6.26 vs. 1.65; odds ratio, 4.47; 95% confidence interval, 1.39~14.37; p=0.009). However, the mortality rate and length of ICU stay did not change after CVC management staff was in place (12.9% vs. 10.7%, p=0.480; 16.00±24.89 vs. 15.87±18.80, p=0.954; respectively). CONCLUSION: In this study, the introduction of CVC management staff effectively reduced CLABSI rates in current ICU system.


Subject(s)
Central Venous Catheters , Critical Care , Cross Infection , Electronic Health Records , Humans , Incidence , Intensive Care Units , Mortality , Odds Ratio , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated , Surgical Wound Infection , Urinary Tract Infections
19.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-200974

ABSTRACT

We describe a case of traumatic aortic dissection associated with cardiac compression in a patient with anaphylactic cardiac arrest who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). A 54-year-old man who was scheduled to undergo surgery for gastric cancer went into cardiac arrest caused by an anaphylactic reaction to prophylactic antibiotics in the operating room. Veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was performed. CPR, including chest compressions, was performed for 35 minutes, and the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU) after spontaneous circulation returned. The patient received ECMO for 9 hours until confirmation of normal cardiac function on transthoracic echocardiography. Twenty days after cardiac arrest, an aortic dissection and fractures in the left fourth and fifth ribs due to chest compression were detected by abdominal computed tomography. The DeBakey type III aortic dissection extended from the distal arch of the thoracic aorta to the proximal level of the renal artery, involving the celiac trunk. It was considered an uncomplicated type B aortic dissection with no sign of malperfusion of the major vessels. This case demonstrates the potential traumatic injuries that can occur after CPR and encourages proper management of mechanical complications in cardiac arrest survivors.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis , Anti-Bacterial Agents , Aorta, Thoracic , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation , Echocardiography , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Heart Arrest , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Middle Aged , Operating Rooms , Renal Artery , Ribs , Stomach Neoplasms , Survivors , Thorax , Tomography, Spiral Computed
20.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-648621

ABSTRACT

Paralytic ileus is a common complication in critically ill patients, and can affect all parts of the gastrointestinal tract. We report a case of paralytic ileus that improved after neostigmine administration. An 80-year-old man was transferred to the intensive care unit after a diagnosis of severe colitis due to Clostridium difficile infection while under conservative treatment for paralytic ileus . The patient's colitis resolved but the ileus did not. This prompted neostigmine administration, resulting in remarkable improvements in the abdominal physical examination and radiographic images. Bowel movements recovered, oral feeding was restarted, and the patient was transferred back to the general ward.


Subject(s)
Aged, 80 and over , Clostridioides difficile , Colitis , Critical Illness , Diagnosis , Gastrointestinal Tract , Humans , Ileus , Intensive Care Units , Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction , Neostigmine , Patients' Rooms , Physical Examination
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