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1.
Article | WPRIM | ID: wpr-833670

ABSTRACT

Background@#and Purpose: Nonketotic hyperglycemia often causes transient visual field defects, but only scattered anecdotes are available in the literature. @*Methods@#We report a patient with homonymous superior quadrantanopsia due to nonketotic hyperglycemia and provide a systematic literature review of the clinical features of 40 previously reported patients (41 in total, including our case) with homonymous visual field defects in association with nonketotic hyperglycemia. @*Results@#The typical visual field defect was congruous (84.6%), homonymous hemianopsia (87.8%) with macular splitting (61.5%) or sparing (38.5%). It was transient and repetitive in 54.5% of the patients, but it developed as a persistent form in the remainder. Positive visual symptoms such as hallucinations and phosphenes developed in 73.2% of patients. Brain MRI revealed corresponding abnormalities in most patients (84.8%), characterized by a low-intensity white-matter signal or a high-intensity gray-matter signal on T2-weighted or fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images with diffusion restriction or gadolinium enhancement. Most (97.0%) patients recovered completely, with 48.5% treated by glycemic control alone and the remainder also receiving antiepileptic agents. @*Conclusions@#Nonketotic hyperglycemia should be considered a possible cause of transient visual field defects, especially when it is associated with repetitive positive visual symptoms and typical MRI findings in hyperglycemic patients.

2.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-713880

ABSTRACT

No abstract available.


Subject(s)
Paralysis
4.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-138769

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We report a novel finding of caloric conversion from normal responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase of vestibular neuritis (VN). METHODS: We recruited 893 patients with a diagnosis of VN at Dizziness Clinic of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from 2003 to 2014 after excluding 28 patients with isolated inferior divisional VN (n=14) and those without follow-up tests despite normal caloric responses initially (n=14). We retrospectively analyzed the neurotological findings in four (0.5%) of the patients who showed a conversion from initially normal caloric responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase. RESULTS: In those four patients, the initial caloric tests were performed within 2 days of symptom onset, and conversion into unilateral caloric paresis was documented 1-4 days later. The clinical and laboratory findings during the initial evaluation were consistent with VN in all four patients except for normal findings in bedside head impulse tests in one of them. CONCLUSIONS: Normal findings in caloric tests should be interpreted with caution during the acute phase of suspected VN. Follow-up evaluation should be considered when the findings of the initial caloric test are normal, but VN remains the most plausible diagnosis.


Subject(s)
Caloric Tests , Diagnosis , Dizziness , Follow-Up Studies , Head Impulse Test , Humans , Paresis , Reflex, Vestibulo-Ocular , Retrospective Studies , Seoul , Vestibular Neuronitis
5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-138768

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We report a novel finding of caloric conversion from normal responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase of vestibular neuritis (VN). METHODS: We recruited 893 patients with a diagnosis of VN at Dizziness Clinic of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from 2003 to 2014 after excluding 28 patients with isolated inferior divisional VN (n=14) and those without follow-up tests despite normal caloric responses initially (n=14). We retrospectively analyzed the neurotological findings in four (0.5%) of the patients who showed a conversion from initially normal caloric responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase. RESULTS: In those four patients, the initial caloric tests were performed within 2 days of symptom onset, and conversion into unilateral caloric paresis was documented 1-4 days later. The clinical and laboratory findings during the initial evaluation were consistent with VN in all four patients except for normal findings in bedside head impulse tests in one of them. CONCLUSIONS: Normal findings in caloric tests should be interpreted with caution during the acute phase of suspected VN. Follow-up evaluation should be considered when the findings of the initial caloric test are normal, but VN remains the most plausible diagnosis.


Subject(s)
Caloric Tests , Diagnosis , Dizziness , Follow-Up Studies , Head Impulse Test , Humans , Paresis , Reflex, Vestibulo-Ocular , Retrospective Studies , Seoul , Vestibular Neuronitis
6.
Journal of Stroke ; : 179-186, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-113530

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The outcomes of acute internal carotid artery (ICA) terminus occlusions are poor. We classified ICA terminus occlusions into 2 groups according to the occlusion pattern of the circle of Willis and hypothesized that clinical outcomes would significantly differ between them. METHODS: Consecutive patients with acute ICA terminus occlusions evaluated by baseline computed tomographic angiography were enrolled. We investigated the occlusion patterns in the circle of Willis, retrospectively classified patients into simple ICA terminus occlusion (STO; with good Willisian collaterals from neighboring cerebral circulation) and complex ICA terminus occlusion (CTO; with one or more of A2 anterior cerebral artery, fetal posterior cerebral artery occlusion, or hypoplastic/absent contralateral A1; or with poor collaterals from anterior communicating artery) groups, and compared their baseline characteristics and outcomes. RESULTS: The STO group (n=58) showed smaller infarct volumes at 72 hours than the CTO group (n=34) (median, 81 mL [interquartile range, 38-192] vs. 414 mL [193-540], P<0.001) and more favorable outcomes (3-month modified Rankin Scale 0-3, 44.8% vs. 8.8%, P<0.001; 3-month mortality, 24.1% vs. 67.6%, P<0.001). In multivariable analyses, STO remained an independent predictor for favorable outcomes (odds ratio 6.1, P=0.010). CONCLUSIONS: Favorable outcomes in STO group suggested that the outcomes of acute ICA terminus occlusions depend on Willisian collateral status. Documenting the subtypes on computed tomographic angiography would help predict patient outcome.


Subject(s)
Angiography , Anterior Cerebral Artery , Carotid Artery Thrombosis , Carotid Artery, Internal , Cerebral Infarction , Circle of Willis , Collateral Circulation , Endovascular Procedures , Humans , Mortality , Posterior Cerebral Artery , Retrospective Studies
7.
Neurology Asia ; : 105-106, 2014.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-628427

ABSTRACT

Sustained downgaze mostly occurs in association with lesions affecting the dorsal midbrain. We report sustained downgaze in a patient with hepatic encephalopathy. The sustained downgaze existed for seven more days after she regained her consciousness. The persistent downgaze even after regaining full consciousness indicates localized pretectal dysfunction rather than diffuse encephalopathy as the mechanism of sustained downgaze in our patient. The ocular motor dysfunction in hepatic encephalopathy may be due to localized dysfunction of the brainstem

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